Physical and sensory effects after brain tumour treatmentPPhysical and sensory effects after brain tumour treatmentPhysical and sensory effects after brain tumour treatmentEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC Krista Rose, BA, BSc, PT10.000000000000049.0000000000000107.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information on the physical and sensory effects that your child may experience following brain tumour treatment.</p><p>Some children with brain tumours may experience physical and sensory long-term effects after treatment.</p> <p>Physical challenges are common in children with brain tumours. About 50% of the people surveyed in the U.S. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study said they had a physical problem. </p> <p>Some treatments can cause problems with hearing. Depending on the treatment, these effects may start to develop during treatment, or else they may appear years later. </p> <p>Vision problems are also common among children with brain tumours. Some problems are caused by the tumour itself. Depending on the tumour, these problems may include squinting, double vision, blurred vision, or the loss of ability to see distances. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Physical challenges, hearing and vision problems are common in children who have had a brain tumour.</li> <li>Your child will need to see a specialist who will help them learn to cope with their specific complication.</li> <li>Depending on your child's complication, it may affect certain aspects of their future such as school and work.</li></ul>
Effets physiques et sensoriels après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesEEffets physiques et sensoriels après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesPhysical and sensory effects after brain tumour treatmentFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCKrista Rose, BA, BSc, PT10.000000000000049.0000000000000107.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements importants sur les effets physiques et sensoriels que votre enfant pourrait subir à la suite du traitement contre une tumeur cérébrale.</p><p>Certains enfants atteints de tumeurs cérébrales pourraient subir des effets physiques et sensoriels à long terme après le traitement.</p> <p>Les difficultés physiques sont fréquentes chez les enfants atteints de tumeurs cérébrales. Environ 50 % des personnes interrogées dans la Childhood Cancer Survivor Study aux États-Unis ont mentionné avoir un problème physique.</p> <p>Certains traitements peuvent causer des problèmes d’audition. Selon le traitement, ces effets peuvent commencer à se manifester pendant le traitement, ou encore des années plus tard.</p> <p>Les troubles de la vue sont aussi fréquents chez les enfants atteints de tumeurs cérébrales. Certains problèmes sont causés par la tumeur elle-même. Tout dépendant de la tumeur, ces problèmes peuvent comprendre, sans toutefois s’y limiter, le strabisme, la double vision, la vue embrouillée ou la perte de la capacité de percevoir les distances.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les problèmes physiques, les troubles d’audition et les troubles de vision sont fréquents chez les enfants atteints de tumeur cérébrale.</li> <li>Votre enfant devra rencontrer un spécialiste qui l'aidera à faire face à la complication qui l'affecte. </li> <li>La complication de votre enfant peut affecter certains aspects de son avenir, comme l’école et le travail.</li></ul>

 

 

Physical and sensory effects after brain tumour treatment1423.00000000000Physical and sensory effects after brain tumour treatmentPhysical and sensory effects after brain tumour treatmentPEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC Krista Rose, BA, BSc, PT10.000000000000049.0000000000000107.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information on the physical and sensory effects that your child may experience following brain tumour treatment.</p><p>Some children with brain tumours may experience physical and sensory long-term effects after treatment.</p> <p>Physical challenges are common in children with brain tumours. About 50% of the people surveyed in the U.S. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study said they had a physical problem. </p> <p>Some treatments can cause problems with hearing. Depending on the treatment, these effects may start to develop during treatment, or else they may appear years later. </p> <p>Vision problems are also common among children with brain tumours. Some problems are caused by the tumour itself. Depending on the tumour, these problems may include squinting, double vision, blurred vision, or the loss of ability to see distances. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Physical challenges, hearing and vision problems are common in children who have had a brain tumour.</li> <li>Your child will need to see a specialist who will help them learn to cope with their specific complication.</li> <li>Depending on your child's complication, it may affect certain aspects of their future such as school and work.</li></ul><figure> <img alt="" /> </figure> <h2>Physical ability</h2> <p>Physical problems are common in children with brain tumours. About 50% of the people surveyed in the U.S. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study said they had a physical problem. This study included 1,600 children or adults who had survived for at least five years after a diagnosis of a malignant brain tumour. Physical problems can include poor balance, tremors, the shakes, being weak in or unable to move the arms or legs, or weakness on one side of the body. The same study showed that about 25% had motor control problems.</p> <h3>What causes the problem?</h3> <p>In some cases, the tumour itself may cause these symptoms. These symptoms may have led to your child’s diagnosis. In a few cases, the physical challenges may occur as a result of surgery, or surgery and radiation.</p> <h3>What can be done?</h3> <p>Some physical problems seem to get better with time. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help improve your child's physical strength and abilities. For tumours in the back of the brain (posterior fossa), some physical symptoms can get worse many years after surgery and radiation. Rehabilitation may need to continue for months or years.</p> <h3>How will it affect your child’s future?</h3> <p>Some of these problems do affect a child’s physical stamina, ability to get around, and join in certain sports. As an adult, the ability to do manual work or drive may be affected. This depends on the particular situation.</p> <h2>Hearing</h2> <p>Some therapies used to treat brain tumours can cause your child’s hearing to deteriorate. Depending on the treatment, these effects may start to develop during treatment, or may appear years later. </p> <h3>What causes this problem?</h3> <ul><li>Certain chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and carboplatin, can cause damage to the inner ear hair cells and may result in hearing loss. Infants treated with chemotherapy drugs risk losing their ability to hear high-pitched sounds. Examples of high-pitched sounds include birds singing, leaves rustling, people whispering, and the speech sounds "s" and "f." If children have problems hearing these sounds, they may also have problems learning to say them properly. Additionally, children may not be able to effectively filter out background noise, which will make paying attention and listening to teachers more difficult and ultimately affect children’s ability to learn. </li> <li>Radiation therapy can cause the build-up of ear wax.</li> <li>The build-up of dry, crusty ear wax can dull the ability for children to hear.</li> <li>For children receiving radiation therapy for certain types of tumours, such as medulloblastomas, as well as ependymomas in the back of the brain (posterior fossa), there is a possibility for significant hearing loss to occur 25 to 30 years after treatment. </li> <li>Some antibiotics can worsen hearing damage. </li></ul> <p>Hearing problems will be more severe when:</p> <ul><li>children are younger at time of treatment</li> <li>the area being treated is larger</li> <li>the radiation dose is higher </li></ul> <h3>How will hearing be screened?</h3> <p>Before and during chemotherapy treatment with cisplatin or carboplatin, an audiologist will monitor your child’s hearing. If the hearing test shows that your child’s hearing is decreasing, the doses of the chemotherapy drugs may be reduced to try and prevent further hearing loss. Your child’s ears will also be monitored for any ear wax build up at this time </p> <h3>What can be done?</h3> <ul><li>For children who suffer from sensorineural hearing loss due to chemotherapy, an audiologist may prescribe hearing aids for your child. Hearing aids will help your child regain access to speech sounds. As a result, they will be able to better focus in the classroom, distinguish between the various speech and environmental sounds. It should help to increase their ability to learn at the same rate as their peers. In addition, if any speech or language difficulties occur due to effects of prolonged hearing loss, therapy with a speech-language pathologist would be recommended. </li> <li>Furthermore, to help with classroom noise, special devices called FM systems as well as classroom acoustic modifications may be available to your child. Your school speech-language pathologist, along with your child’s teacher and audiologist, will help to determine what your child needs and how to implement these supports in the school. </li> <li>Mineral oil used periodically in the ears will help manage ear wax build-up. Make sure to check with your doctor first to find out if the use of mineral oil is appropriate for your child. </li> <li>Adults who develop hearing loss caused by radiation received during childhood may also need to use hearing aids. Radiation oncologists (doctors who use radiation in treatment), are always trying new techniques to lower the radiation dose to the inner ear, which may reduce the occurrence and/or degree of hearing loss. </li></ul> <h2>Vision</h2> <p>Vision problems are not uncommon among children with brain tumours. Some problems are caused by the tumour itself, depending on the tumour location. These problems may include squinting, double vision, blurred vision, or the loss of ability to see distances. In rare cases, blindness may develop. Cataracts may also develop after certain treatments. Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. </p> <h3>What causes the problem?</h3> <p>There are different causes for the problems that may occur.</p> <ul><li>Certain tumours can lead to vision problems such as loss of vision. A tumour in the optic pathway can lead to a narrower visual field, or blindness in one or both eyes. </li> <li>Hydrocephalus also affects the optic nerve. It can lead to a decrease in vision, and in rare cases to blindness. </li> <li>Craniospinal radiation or the long-term use of steroids can cause cataracts. They can cause blurred or cloudy vision, or make children sensitive to bright lights. </li></ul> <h3>What can be done?</h3> <p>Children whose sight is affected will need regular checkups with an ophthalmologist, a doctor who specializes in eye care. In many cases, these vision problems can’t be corrected with glasses. </p> <p>If your child has vision problems, some changes may need to be made in the classroom. For example, they may have problems reading the blackboard and may need to sit at the front of the class. Use large print books and handouts. </p> <p>Children who develop blindness will need extra support. This support can come from a community organization that provides help to blind people, such as the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, The National Federation of the Blind in the U.S., or the Royal National Institute for the Blind in the U.K. Learning Braille, a touch-based alphabet for blind people, may be an option. </p> <p>If a child has cataracts, there may not be any changes in vision if the cataract is small. If the cataract is larger or grows over time and this creates problems with daily activities. It may need to be removed with surgery. </p> <h3>How will this affect your child’s future?</h3> <p>As an adult, vision problems may affect the ability to do certain jobs or drive a car. This depends on how much the child's vision is affected. </p>Physical and sensory effects after brain tumour treatment

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