Growth effects of brain tumours and treatmentGGrowth effects of brain tumours and treatmentGrowth effects of brain tumours and treatmentEnglishNeurology;Developmental;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Endocrine systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000063.0000000000000613.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning the growth problems that may arise as a side effect of radiation therapy. Answers by Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>Growth problems may occur among children who receive radiation therapy or those who have tumours located in or close to the pituitary gland (craniopharyngiomas or hypothalamic gliomas). As a result, some children may not grow as tall as they would have. The growth of the skull may also be affected. Some children’s facial features might look different. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Growth problems may be caused by the tumour itself, surgery, radiation or side effects of chemotherapy.</li> <li>Growth hormone may be given to help maintain growth in your child.</li> <li>Research show that growth hormone does not cause tumour cells to recur.</li> <li>Growth hormone deficiency mayy increase risk for heart disease, lower muscle strength, weak bones, and lower lean body mass.</li></ul>
Effets sur la croissance du le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesEEffets sur la croissance du le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesGrowth effects of brain tumours and treatmentFrenchNeurology;Developmental;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Endocrine systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000063.0000000000000613.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements approfondis sur les problèmes de croissance qui peuvent survenir à la suite de la radiothérapie. Réponses des hôpitaux pédiatriques canadiens.</p><p>Des problèmes de croissance peuvent survenir chez les enfants qui reçoivent de la radiothérapie ou chez ceux qui ont des tumeurs situées à l'intérieur ou à proximité de l’hypophyse (craniopharyngiomes ou gliomes hypothalamiques). En conséquence, certains enfants pourraient ne pas devenir aussi grands qu’ils auraient dû. La croissance du crâne pourrait aussi être affectée. Les traits faciaux de certains enfants pourraient changer. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les problèmes de croissance peuvent être causés par la tumeur elle-même, l’intervention chirurgicale, la radiothérapie ou les effets indésirablesde la chimiothérapie.</li> <li>Des hormones de croissance peuvent être administrées afin de maintenir la croissance de votre enfant.</li> <li>La recherche démontre que les hormones de croissance ne sont pas la cause des récidives des cellules tumorales.</li> <li>Un manque d’hormone de croissance peut augmenter le risque de maladies cardiaques, d’une plus faible force musculaire, de faiblesse des os et d’une faible masse corporelle.</li></ul>

 

 

Growth effects of brain tumours and treatment1424.00000000000Growth effects of brain tumours and treatmentGrowth effects of brain tumours and treatmentGEnglishNeurology;Developmental;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Endocrine systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000063.0000000000000613.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning the growth problems that may arise as a side effect of radiation therapy. Answers by Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>Growth problems may occur among children who receive radiation therapy or those who have tumours located in or close to the pituitary gland (craniopharyngiomas or hypothalamic gliomas). As a result, some children may not grow as tall as they would have. The growth of the skull may also be affected. Some children’s facial features might look different. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Growth problems may be caused by the tumour itself, surgery, radiation or side effects of chemotherapy.</li> <li>Growth hormone may be given to help maintain growth in your child.</li> <li>Research show that growth hormone does not cause tumour cells to recur.</li> <li>Growth hormone deficiency mayy increase risk for heart disease, lower muscle strength, weak bones, and lower lean body mass.</li></ul><h2>What causes this?</h2> <p>There are several possible causes for growth problems.</p> <figure> <span class="">Parts of the Brain That Control Growth</span> <img /> <figcaption class="“asset-image-caption”">The hypothalamus and pituitary gland control the production of growth hormone. This hormone controls how our bodies grow and develop.</figcaption> </figure> <ul> <li> The tumour itself, surgery, or radiation to the central part of the brain may damage the pituitary gland. This gland is responsible for producing growth hormone. As a result, the pituitary gland may not produce enough growth hormone. The lack of this hormone is called growth hormone deficiency. In the U.S. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 21% of adult cancer survivors said they had low growth hormone levels. </li> <li> Radiation therapy to the brain and spine can slow the growth of bones in the skull and spine. This can result in a shorter spine and smaller skull or facial bones. </li> <li> In some cases, radiation causes early puberty. This may reduce overall height because growth spurts happen earlier and end sooner. </li> <li> A poor appetite as a result of chemotherapy or other factors can result in a poor diet. This is less common, but it can affect height. </li></ul> <p>With radiation therapy, the problems will be more severe when the child is younger, when the radiation dose to the spine is higher. </p> <h2>How will this be screened?</h2> <p>During follow-up clinic visits, height and weight will be recorded on a growth chart. These will be compared to the range of typical growth for children of the same sex and age. The adult height of the mother and father will be considered. Growth hormone levels in the blood can also be checked if growth problems have been detected. It is important to follow growth closely because the problem can appear years after treatment. </p> <h2>What can be done?</h2> <ul> <li> Growth hormone can be given to help maintain growth if there is growth hormone deficiency. It is taken by injection six days a week. It is effective in maintaining normal growth and growth spurts. It has the greatest effect if it is started before puberty. The decision to use growth hormone should be made with the treatment team and the endocrinologist, a doctor who specializes in treating hormone problems. </li> <li> There is no treatment to increase height if the spine is affected by radiation. The spine is shortened by the effect of radiation and growth hormone won’t help the spine grow. </li> <li> Early puberty can be treated with medications that stop puberty, and as a result increase growth.</li> <li> It’s important to make sure that during treatment, children are well-nourished to help them grow.</li></ul> <h2>Can growth hormone cause the tumour to grow back?</h2> <p>There have been fears that growth hormone might cause tumour cells to grow back, because it stimulates cell growth. There has been reassuring news from many studies, including the U.S. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. This study shows that growth hormone does not cause tumour cells to recur. There was no greater chance of a tumour growing back among people who received growth hormone treatment when compared with those who had no growth hormone treatment. </p> <h2>How will this affect your child’s future?</h2> <p>Children whose growth is affected may be significantly shorter than they would have been. If growth hormone deficiency is untreated, it may increase the risk for heart disease, lower muscle strength, weak bones (osteoporosis), and lower lean body mass. Some research has suggested that growth hormone may need to be taken for life. </p>Growth effects of brain tumours and treatment

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.