Thyroid effects after brain tumour treatmentTThyroid effects after brain tumour treatmentThyroid effects after brain tumour treatmentEnglishNeurology;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;ThyroidNervous system;Endocrine systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC494.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning thyroid problems that may arise as a result of your child's radiation therapy, and what can be done.</p><p>Radiation therapy to the brain or neck, surgery, or certain tumours such as craniopharyngiomas may damage the thyroid gland and cause thyroid problems. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the neck. As a result of damage from radiation, surgery, or the tumour itself, the thyroid gland may not produce enough hormones. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The thyroid hormones are chemicals controlling many important processes in the body that produce energy.</li> <li>Thyroid problems may develop months or years after treatment has ended, so thyroid hormone levels will be checked each year for life.</li> <li>Radiation therapy may cause thyroid problems.</li> <li>Children who are affected will need to have lifelong hormone replacement.</li</li></ul>
Effets sur la glande thyroïde après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesEEffets sur la glande thyroïde après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesThyroid effects after brain tumour treatmentFrenchNeurology;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;ThyroidNervous system;Endocrine systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC494.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements approfondis sur les problèmes thyroïdiens qui peuvent survenir à la suite de la radiothérapie de votre enfant, et ce que l’on peut faire.</p><p>La radiothérapie dans l’encéphale ou le cou, la chirurgie ou certaines tumeurs comme les craniopharyngiomes peuvent endommager la glande thyroïde et causer des problèmes thyroïdiens. La glande thyroïde est une glande en forme de papillon qui se trouve dans le cou. À la suite de dommages causés par la radiothérapie, la chirurgie ou la tumeur elle-même, la glande thyroïde pourrait ne pas produire assez d’hormones. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les hormones thyroïdiennes sont des substances chimiques qui régissent bon nombre de processus importants dans le corps et qui produisent de l’énergie.</li> <li>Des problèmes thyroïdiens peuvent se manifester des mois ou des années après le traitement de telle sorte que les niveaux des hormones thyroïdiennes doivent être analysés chaque année pour le restant des jours du patient.</li> <li>La radiothérapie peut causer des problèmes thyroïdiens.</li> <li>Les enfants qui en sont atteints auront besoin d’hormones de remplacement pour le restant de leurs jours.</li></ul>

 

 

Thyroid effects after brain tumour treatment1425.00000000000Thyroid effects after brain tumour treatmentThyroid effects after brain tumour treatmentTEnglishNeurology;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;ThyroidNervous system;Endocrine systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC494.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning thyroid problems that may arise as a result of your child's radiation therapy, and what can be done.</p><p>Radiation therapy to the brain or neck, surgery, or certain tumours such as craniopharyngiomas may damage the thyroid gland and cause thyroid problems. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the neck. As a result of damage from radiation, surgery, or the tumour itself, the thyroid gland may not produce enough hormones. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The thyroid hormones are chemicals controlling many important processes in the body that produce energy.</li> <li>Thyroid problems may develop months or years after treatment has ended, so thyroid hormone levels will be checked each year for life.</li> <li>Radiation therapy may cause thyroid problems.</li> <li>Children who are affected will need to have lifelong hormone replacement.</li</li></ul><figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Thyroid Function</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Thyroid_function_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The pituitary gland releases hormones that control the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland releases hormones that control many body functions.</figcaption> </figure> <p>The thyroid hormones are chemicals controlling many important processes in the body that produce energy. For example, thyroid hormones control how our bodies use oxygen, and break down carbohydrates and cholesterol from food. They also affect our growth and thinking. When the body does not have enough thyroid hormones, the condition is called hypothyroidism. </p><p>Thyroid problems may develop months or years after treatment. The U.S. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study showed that of 1,607 people with brain tumours, 16% said they had thyroid problems. </p><p>When thyroid hormone levels are low, many body functions slow down. The symptoms can be very subtle, or very obvious. Some of the symptoms of hypothyroidism are: </p><ul><li> fatigue </li><li> problems concentrating</li><li> depression or mood changes </li><li> weakness</li><li> weight gain</li><li> dry skin</li><li> constipation </li><li> anemia </li><li> hair loss</li><li> poor growth</li></ul><h2>What causes the problem?</h2><p>Radiation therapy may cause thyroid problems in one of two ways:</p><ol><li> Radiation to the brain may damage the pituitary gland, which produces the hormone that controls the thyroid gland. The pituitary gland normally produces thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH signals the thyroid gland to produce the thyroid hormones: thyroxine (T3) and triiodothyronine (T4). When the pituitary is damaged, it produces less TSH. As a result, the production of thyroid hormones will decrease or stop. </li><li> During craniospinal radiation, the radiation beam may exit the body near the thyroid gland. This may cause damage to the gland. As a result, the gland is not able to produce enough thyroid hormones: thyroxine (T3) and triiodothyronine (T4). At first, the pituitary gland will respond by producing more TSH. </li></ol><h2>How will this be screened?</h2><p>During follow-up clinic visits, the doctor will feel the thyroid gland by hand and ask if there are any of the symptoms of hypothyroidism. TSH and T4 levels will be checked in blood tests. Growth and height will be recorded on a growth chart. Thyroid problems are often diagnosed by the presence of symptoms, and are confirmed by blood tests. </p><h2>What can be done?</h2><p>Low thyroid hormone levels can be easily treated with a man-made thyroid hormone. It is taken daily in a pill form. The decision to do this will be made with the treatment team and the endocrinologist, a doctor who specializes in treating hormone problems. </p><h2>How will this affect your child’s future?</h2><p>Children who are affected will need to have lifelong hormone replacement. Females who are at risk of having thyroid problems should have their thyroid levels checked before trying to become pregnant and during pregnancy for the health of the mother and fetus. </p><p>Thyroid problems can develop 10 or more years after treatment, so thyroid hormone levels will need to be checked each year for life. Children who have received craniospinal radiation may develop a thyroid cyst or thyroid cancer. Therefore, part of their follow-up may include ultrasound of the thyroid gland. </p>Thyroid effects after brain tumour treatment

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