Osteoporosis after brain tumour treatmentOOsteoporosis after brain tumour treatmentOsteoporosis after brain tumour treatmentEnglishNeurology;Orthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000053.0000000000000604.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed information on how osteoporosis can develop in your child as a result of brain tumour treatment, and preventative methods to be taken.</p><p>Osteoporosis is a weakening of the bones. With osteoporosis, the bones are weak because they are less dense and can break easily. Children who have been treated for a brain tumour have an increased chance of developing osteoporosis as they get older. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Children who have been treated for brain tumours may be at increased risk of bone loss, which can make the bones become weaker.</li> <li>Growth problems can increase the risk of osteoporosis, and treatment can increase some of the factors that affect bone density.</li> <li>Calcium and vitamin D supplements may be needed and your child should try to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.</li></ul>
Ostéoporose après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesOOstéoporose après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesOsteoporosis after brain tumour treatmentFrenchNeurology;Orthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000053.0000000000000604.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements détaillés sur la façon dont l’ostéoporose peut se développer chez votre enfant à la suite du traitement contre une tumeur cérébrale et méthodes de prévention à appliquer.</p><p>L’ostéoporose est un affaiblissement des os. Avec l’ostéoporose, les os sont faibles parce qu’ils sont moins denses et ils peuvent se briser facilement. Les enfants traités pour une tumeur cérébrale ont des risques accrus de développer de l’ostéoporose en vieillissant.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les enfants traités pour une tumeur cérébrale peuvent présenter un risque accru de perte osseuse, ce qui peut affaiblir les os.</li> <li>Les problèmes de croissance peuvent augmenter les risques d’ostéoporose et le traitement peut augmenter les facteurs qui affectent la densité osseuse.</li> <li>Des suppléments de calcium et de vitamine D pourraient être nécessaires et votre enfant devrait essayer de maintenir un style de vie sain et actif.</li></ul>

 

 

Osteoporosis after brain tumour treatment1426.00000000000Osteoporosis after brain tumour treatmentOsteoporosis after brain tumour treatmentOEnglishNeurology;Orthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000053.0000000000000604.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed information on how osteoporosis can develop in your child as a result of brain tumour treatment, and preventative methods to be taken.</p><p>Osteoporosis is a weakening of the bones. With osteoporosis, the bones are weak because they are less dense and can break easily. Children who have been treated for a brain tumour have an increased chance of developing osteoporosis as they get older. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Children who have been treated for brain tumours may be at increased risk of bone loss, which can make the bones become weaker.</li> <li>Growth problems can increase the risk of osteoporosis, and treatment can increase some of the factors that affect bone density.</li> <li>Calcium and vitamin D supplements may be needed and your child should try to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.</li></ul><h2>How do normal bones develop?</h2> <p>Bones are made of strong protein fibres and bone salt made of calcium, phosphate and other minerals. New bone tissue is continually being formed by cells called osteoblasts, and old tissue is continually removed (resorbed) throughout our lifetime by other cells called osteoclasts. This process of constantly making new bone and resorbing old bone keeps our bones healthy and strong. </p> <p>When we are young, bone formation usually occurs faster than bone loss. Our bones usually reach their peak bone density (bone strength) during our late 20s. In our mid-30s, we gradually start losing bone at a faster rate than we make it. This is a natural process. </p> <h2>Osteoporosis in children treated for brain tumours</h2> <p>Children who have been treated for brain tumours may be at increased risk of bone loss, which can make the bones become weaker. Most bone loss occurs during the early months of treatment. There are two types of bone loss. Osteopenia is a milder form of bone loss with no symptoms that can be treated easily. </p> <p>If bone loss is untreated in the long term, your child may develop osteoporosis. The bones in her hips, wrists or other areas will be more likely to break easily as the result of a fall. The bones in her spine may collapse together, causing pain and curvature of the spine. </p> <p>Brain tumour treatment may affect the bones in two different ways. First, children who receive brain tumour treatment may never reach normal peak bone density during the young adult years. Therefore, they may develop osteoporosis at a younger age than other adults. Second, treatment may cause an increase in some of the factors that affect bone density, which are shown below: </p> <ul> <li> The long-term use of steroids, such as dexamethasone, can cause bone loss. </li> <li> Radiation therapy may produce bone loss at the site that was treated. </li> <li> Radiation may also cause growth hormone deficiency or hypothyroidism, both of which are associated with the development of osteoporosis. </li> <li> If children are not physically active or are bedridden for long periods, bone loss can occur.</li> <li> Early puberty or early menopause in young women can prevent peak bone mass from being reached.</li> <li> Some chemotherapy drugs can affect the bones. </li></ul> <h2>What can be done?</h2> <p>If bone loss is a potential issue, your child’s doctor may order a test called a DEXA scan to assess her bone density. The treatment team will assess your child’s exercise levels and diet. The treatment team will discuss the need for calcium/vitamin D supplements. Calcium is needed for new bone to form; vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. </p> <p>Your child should stay as physically active as possible, using weight-bearing exercises such as brisk walking, hiking, soccer, baseball, dancing and skating. They should avoid salty or processed foods. Salty foods prevent the body from absorbing calcium, which is needed to make new bone cells. </p> <p>In adults, research has shown that four key behaviours can help prevent osteoporosis. These are:</p> <ul> <li> eating a balanced diet with enough calcium and vitamin D</li> <li> not smoking, because it affects the body’s ability to absorb calcium</li> <li> limiting caffeine, alcohol, and carbonated beverages. They affect the body’s ability to absorb calcium. </li> <li> exercising regularly with weight-bearing exercises (climbing stairs, lifting weights). This increases bone density.</li></ul>Osteoporosis after brain tumour treatment

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