Diabetes insipidus after brain tumour treatmentDDiabetes insipidus after brain tumour treatmentDiabetes insipidus after brain tumour treatmentEnglishNeurology;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;Kidneys;BladderNervous system;Endocrine system;Renal system/Urinary systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000053.0000000000000376.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed description of diabetes insipidus: what can cause this rare condition and what the impact may be on your child's future.</p><p>Diabetes insipidus is a condition that causes intense feelings of thirst and the need to urinate (pee) often. It occurs because the body is not able to prevent water loss. Diabetes insipidus is rare. It may happen when the tumour is near the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, if there is damage to these areas. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Diabetes insipidus may be caused by the tumour or by the surgery to treat it.</li> <li>Diabetes insipidus can be treated with a man-made form of antidiuretic hormone called desmopressin of DDAVP.</li> <li>If the condition is not treated it will lead to dehydration and an electrolyte imbalance.</li> <li>In some cases, diabetes insipidus may go away a few weeks after surgery.</li></ul>
Diabète insipide après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesDDiabète insipide après le traitement des tumeurs cérébralesDiabetes insipidus after brain tumour treatmentFrenchNeurology;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;Kidneys;BladderNervous system;Endocrine system;Renal system/Urinary systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000053.0000000000000376.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Description détaillée du diabète insipide : ce qui peut causer ce rare état et quelles peuvent être ses répercussions sur l’avenir de votre enfant.</p><p>Le diabète insipide est une maladie qui cause d’intense sensations de soif et le besoin d’uriner souvent. Il se produit parce que le corps ne peut pas empêcher la perte d’eau. Le diabète insipide est rare. Il peut se produire quand la tumeur se trouve près de l’hypothalamus ou de l’hypophyse, s’il y a des dommages à ces régions. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Le diabète insipide peut être causé par la tumeur ou par l’intervention chirurgicale destinée à la traiter.</li> <li>On peut traiter le diabète insipide avec une forme d’hormone antidiurétique artificielle nommée desmopressine ou DDAVP.</li> <li>Si le trouble n’est pas traité, il mènera à une déshydratation ou à un déséquilibre des électrolytes.</li> <li>Dans certains cas, le diabète insipide peut disparaître quelques semaines après la l’intervention chirurgicale.</li></ul>

 

 

Diabetes insipidus after brain tumour treatment1430.00000000000Diabetes insipidus after brain tumour treatmentDiabetes insipidus after brain tumour treatmentDEnglishNeurology;EndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;Kidneys;BladderNervous system;Endocrine system;Renal system/Urinary systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC9.0000000000000053.0000000000000376.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed description of diabetes insipidus: what can cause this rare condition and what the impact may be on your child's future.</p><p>Diabetes insipidus is a condition that causes intense feelings of thirst and the need to urinate (pee) often. It occurs because the body is not able to prevent water loss. Diabetes insipidus is rare. It may happen when the tumour is near the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, if there is damage to these areas. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Diabetes insipidus may be caused by the tumour or by the surgery to treat it.</li> <li>Diabetes insipidus can be treated with a man-made form of antidiuretic hormone called desmopressin of DDAVP.</li> <li>If the condition is not treated it will lead to dehydration and an electrolyte imbalance.</li> <li>In some cases, diabetes insipidus may go away a few weeks after surgery.</li></ul><figure> <span class="">Water Regulation</span> <img /> <figcaption class="“asset-image-caption”">The hypothalamus and pituitary gland produce hormones that are involved in controlling thirst and the need to urinate. These hormones trigger the kidneys to conserve water.</figcaption> </figure> <p>The hypothalamus is our “thirst centre,” sensing when we need to drink. It produces a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH), which is also called vasopressin. ADH helps the body conserve water. It is stored and released from the pituitary gland. It then acts on kidneys. The kidneys concentrate our urine and conserve water. Without ADH, the kidneys cannot conserve water and the urine becomes dilute or watery. This causes children to pee a large amount and makes them extremely thirsty to replace the water that was lost in the urine. If they do not act on the feeling of thirst and drink enough fluids, they will become dehydrated. </p> <h2>What causes this?</h2> <p>There are two possible causes of diabetes insipidus:</p> <ul> <li> The tumour: If a tumour is pressing on the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, it may affect the production of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). </li> <li> The surgery: The pituitary stalk may be cut or damaged during removal of the tumour. This affects the production of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) for a few weeks, or in some cases permanently. </li></ul> <h2>How will this be screened?</h2> <p>If there is a potential problem, tests will be done to check urine concentration and volume, and water balance in the body, particularly during and after surgery. </p> <h2>What can be done?</h2> <p>Diabetes insipidus can be treated with a man-made form of ADH (<a href="/Article?contentid=122&language=English">desmopressin​</a> or DDAVP). It is taken as a nasal spray or as a tablet to supplement or replace the ADH produced by the pituitary gland. </p> <h2>How will this affect your child’s future?</h2> <p>Children who have diabetes insipidus may need to take desmopressin supplements for life. If the condition is not treated, it will lead to dehydration or an imbalance of electrolytes. However, in some cases it may go away a few weeks after surgery. </p>Diabetes insipidus after brain tumour treatment

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