Milk and alternativesMMilk and alternativesMilk and alternativesEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the nutrients in and recommended serving sizes for milk and alternatives, one of the four food groups in Canada's Food Guide.<br></p><ul><li>Source of protein</li><li>Good source of vitamins A and D, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium<br></li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Milk products and alternatives are a source of protein and good source of vitamins A and D, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium.</li><li>Children aged two to five should drink 1% or 2% milk. Older children should drink skim milk.</li><li>Too much milk can be unhealthy and hinder your child's appetite. Aim for 500 mL (two cups) a day.</li><li>Offer higher-fat yogurts and cheese to children under age two and low-fat, low-sugar options to older children.</li></ul>
Lait et substitutsLLait et substitutsMilk and alternativesFrenchNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez les nutriments présents dans le lait et les substituts, l’un des quatre groupes alimentaires du Guide alimentaire canadien, de même que la taille des portions recommandées.<br></p><ul><li>Source de protéines</li><li>Bonne source de vitamines A et D, de calcium, de phosphore et de magnésium<br></li></ul><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Le lait et les substituts sont une source de protéines et une bonne source de vitamines A et D, de calcium, de phosphore et de magnésium.</li><li>Les enfants de deux à cinq ans doivent boire du lait 1 % ou 2 %. Les enfants plus âgés doivent boire du lait écrémé.</li><li>Une quantité excessive de lait peut être malsaine et compromettre l’appétit de votre enfant. Limitez sa consommation à 500 mL (deux tasses) par jour.</li><li>Les enfants de moins de deux ans devraient manger des yogourts riches en matières grasses tandis que les enfants de plus de deux ans devraient consommer des aliments à faible teneur en matières grasses et en sucre.<br></li></ul>

 

 

Milk and alternatives1439.00000000000Milk and alternativesMilk and alternativesMEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the nutrients in and recommended serving sizes for milk and alternatives, one of the four food groups in Canada's Food Guide.<br></p><ul><li>Source of protein</li><li>Good source of vitamins A and D, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium<br></li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Milk products and alternatives are a source of protein and good source of vitamins A and D, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium.</li><li>Children aged two to five should drink 1% or 2% milk. Older children should drink skim milk.</li><li>Too much milk can be unhealthy and hinder your child's appetite. Aim for 500 mL (two cups) a day.</li><li>Offer higher-fat yogurts and cheese to children under age two and low-fat, low-sugar options to older children.</li></ul><h2>Examples of single servings</h2>   <figure class="asset-c-100"><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/MilkAndAlternatives_EN.png" alt="" /> </figure>   <h2>Serving tips</h2><ul><li>Have 500 mL (2 cups) of milk every day. </li><li>Children aged two to five should drink 1% or 2% milk. Children age five and older should drink skim milk. </li><li>While milk is important, too much milk can be unhealthy, especially for babies over 12 months and toddlers.</li><ul><li>Babies under 12 months should have as much breast milk or formula as they need, as it provides them with almost all the nutrients they need during this time (except for vitamin D if a baby is only breastfeeding). </li><li>When your child reaches 12 months, aim for them to have 500 mL (16 oz.) of milk a day. More milk than that in a day fills up the tummy and reduces your child's appetite for the variety of other foods that provide them with other important nutrients. Too much milk over time can also lead to iron deficiency anemia. </li><li>Once your child shows signs they can hold a cup or "sippy cup" (usually at around 12 months but sometimes sooner), try to encourage them to drink milk from it. Switching from a bottle to a cup at age 12 to 18 months has been shown to decrease the chance that a child will drink too much milk.</li></ul><li>Compare the Nutrition Facts table on yogurts or cheeses. Children under age two benefit from higher-fat yogurts, but older children should have low-fat cheese and low-fat and low-sugar yogurt. </li><li>Drink fortified unsweetened soy beverages (drinks with added vitamins and minerals) if you do not drink dairy milk. </li></ul><p> <a href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/INM_NRC_track1-2-1_food_groups_pdf.pdf" target="_blank">Print-Friendly Version</a></p>Milk and alternatives

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