Fitting treats and drinks into your family's dietFFitting treats and drinks into your family's dietFitting treats and drinks into your family's dietEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to fit treats and drinks into your family's daily diet.</p><p>Canada's Food Guide focuses on the four food groups that make up a healthy, balanced diet. It does not include fatty or sweet "treat" foods. </p><p>A healthy perspective is to allow "all foods to fit" in a balanced diet. This means choosing food from all the food groups regularly and allowing your children a few treats each week. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A balanced diet includes nutritious food from the four food groups in Canada's Food Guide as well as occasional treats.<br></li><li>Limit higher calorie treats and snacks such as cakes, cookies, chocolate, fries, nachos and potato chips.</li><li>Instead offer your child low-fat yogurt, low-fat hummus and fresh or dried fruit. Children aged five and older can also have popcorn, nuts, crackers or raw vegetables.</li><li>To keep the right balance between fluids and nutrients encourage your child to drink plain water regularly and cut out or limit sugary drinks such as soda, sports and energy drinks or sweetened tea or coffee.<br></li></ul>
L'intégration des friandises et des boissons dans l’alimentation quotidienne de votre familleLL'intégration des friandises et des boissons dans l’alimentation quotidienne de votre familleFitting treats and drinks into your family's dietFrenchNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez comment faire une juste place aux gâteries et aux boissons dans l’alimentation quotidienne de votre famille.</p><p>Le Guide alimentaire canadien met l’accent sur les quatre groupes alimentaires essentiels à un régime alimentaire sain et équilibré. Il ne tient pas compte des « gâteries », aliments gras ou sucrés.</p> <p>Une solution saine est d’établir une alimentation équilibrée dans laquelle « tous les aliments ont leur place ». Cela signifie de choisir régulièrement des aliments de chacun des quatre groupes alimentaires et de permettre quelques gâteries par semaine à vos enfants.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Un régime équilibré comprend des aliments nutritifs provenant des quatre groupes alimentaires du Guide alimentaire canadien ainsi que des gâteries à l’occasion.</li> <li>Limitez les gâteries et les collations riches en calories comme les gâteaux, les biscuits, le chocolat, les frites, les nachos et les croustilles.</li> <li>Offrez à votre enfant un yogourt faible en matières grasses, de l’houmous faible en matières grasses et des fruits frais ou secs. Les enfants de plus de cinq ans peuvent aussi consommer du maïs soufflé, des noix, des craquelins ou des légumes crus.</li> <li>Afin de conserver un équilibre entre les liquides et les nutriments, encouragez votre enfant à boire de l’eau de manière régulière et à couper ou limiter sa consommation de boissons sucrées comme les boissons gazeuses, les boissons pour sportifs et les boissons énergisantes de même que le thé ou le café sucré.</li></ul>

 

 

Fitting treats and drinks into your family's diet1441.00000000000Fitting treats and drinks into your family's dietFitting treats and drinks into your family's dietFEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to fit treats and drinks into your family's daily diet.</p><p>Canada's Food Guide focuses on the four food groups that make up a healthy, balanced diet. It does not include fatty or sweet "treat" foods. </p><p>A healthy perspective is to allow "all foods to fit" in a balanced diet. This means choosing food from all the food groups regularly and allowing your children a few treats each week. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A balanced diet includes nutritious food from the four food groups in Canada's Food Guide as well as occasional treats.<br></li><li>Limit higher calorie treats and snacks such as cakes, cookies, chocolate, fries, nachos and potato chips.</li><li>Instead offer your child low-fat yogurt, low-fat hummus and fresh or dried fruit. Children aged five and older can also have popcorn, nuts, crackers or raw vegetables.</li><li>To keep the right balance between fluids and nutrients encourage your child to drink plain water regularly and cut out or limit sugary drinks such as soda, sports and energy drinks or sweetened tea or coffee.<br></li></ul><h2>"Treat" foods</h2><p>Limit cakes, pastries, cookies, granola bars, candy, chocolate, ice-cream, store-bought muffins, French fries, nachos and other foods that are high in calories, fat, sugar or salt (sodium). They can be enjoyed once in a while, but they should not make up a regular part of your family's diet. </p><p>Instead, consider the following healthy treats. </p><ul><li>Popcorn*</li><li>Nuts*</li><li>Raw carrots, celery or peppers* </li><li>Some low-fat, wholegrain crackers* </li><li>Plain low-fat yogurt</li><li>Low-fat hummus</li><li>Fresh or dried fruit (cut larger fruit into smaller chunks and encourage your child to brush their teeth afterwards to prevent tooth decay)</li></ul><p>*These are only suitable for children aged five and older. They can be a serious choking hazard for younger children.</p><h2>Drinks</h2> <p>We may not consider it, but drinks are food too. We need to drink enough fluids to keep our body working at its best. But we also need to be mindful of how the fluids we drink contribute to our diet and fit into the food groups.</p><p>To keep the right balance between fluid and nutrients, cut out or limit the following drinks to a treat in your family's diet:</p><ul><li>fruit-flavoured sugared drinks</li><li>soft drinks (pop or soda)</li><li>sports and energy drinks</li><li>sweetened hot or cold drinks.</li></ul><p>According to <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/hc-sc/migration/hc-sc/fn-an/alt_formats/hpfb-dgpsa/pdf/food-guide-aliment/view_eatwell_vue_bienmang-eng.pdf" target="_blank">Canada's Food Guide</a>, the number one tip is to drink water regularly! It is the best calorie-free way to quench thirst. Follow the general recommendations for how much water to drink each day, but remember to drink more in hot weather and when you are active. Young children and older adults are especially at risk of dehydration if they do not drink enough, so remind them to drink regularly.</p><h2>Serving tips</h2><ul><li>Drink water with your meals.</li><li>Keep water cold by storing it in a filter jug in the fridge.</li><li>Use a portable water container at work and give your child water to bring to school.</li><li>Add lemon, lime, cucumber or orange wedges to add variety and flavour.</li></ul>Fitting treats and drinks into your family's diet

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.