Sweeteners and caffeine: Acceptable daily intakeSSweeteners and caffeine: Acceptable daily intakeSweeteners and caffeineEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Discover the sources and acceptable daily intake limits, if any, of sweeteners and caffeine.<br></p><p>The Nutrition Facts table tells us about specific nutrients in a food, but we know that many foods have ingredients that do not contain required nutrients. Sweeteners and caffeine are just two ingredients that have entered our daily diet without adding much, if any, nutritional value. </p> <br><br><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Artificial sweeteners include sugar alcohols, aspartame, cyclamate, saccharin and sucralose. Most are safe within acceptable daily intake limits, but some should be avoided during pregnancy or if there is a pre-existing medical condition.</li><li>Caffeine is a drug that can be found in coffee, tea, cola beverages, energy drinks, chocolate and some medicines.</li><li>As it is a stimulant, acceptable daily intake limits range from 45 mg or less for children aged four to six to 2.5 mg per kilogram of body weight for teens.<br></li></ul>
Autres ingrédientsAAutres ingrédientsArtificial sweeteners and caffeine: Sources and acceptable intakeFrenchNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez les sources et les quantités journalières éventuellement acceptables d’édulcorants et de caféine.</p><p>Le tableau des valeurs nutritives nous renseigne sur certains nutriments contenus dans un aliment, mais nous savons que plusieurs aliments sont faits d’ingrédients qui ne contiennent pas les nutriments requis. Les édulcorants et la caféine sont deux ingrédients qui se sont introduits dans notre régime alimentaire quotidien sans ajouter grand chose à la valeur nutritionnelle. </p> <br><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les édulcorants regroupent l’alcool de sucre, l’aspartame, le cyclamate, la saccharine et le sucralose. La plupart sont sans danger si les limites de la dose journalière acceptable sont respectées, mais certains devraient être évités pendant la grossesse ou selon l’état de santé.</li> <li>La caféine est un stimulant que l’on retrouve dans le café, le thé, les boissons gazeuses, les boissons énergisantes, le chocolat et certains médicaments.</li> <li>Comme la caféine est un stimulant, les limites de la dose journalière acceptable vont de 45 mg ou moins pour les enfants âgés de quatre à six ans à 2,5 mg par kilogramme de masse corporelle pour les adolescents.</li></ul>

 

 

Sweeteners and caffeine: Acceptable daily intake1454.00000000000Sweeteners and caffeine: Acceptable daily intakeSweeteners and caffeineSEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Discover the sources and acceptable daily intake limits, if any, of sweeteners and caffeine.<br></p><p>The Nutrition Facts table tells us about specific nutrients in a food, but we know that many foods have ingredients that do not contain required nutrients. Sweeteners and caffeine are just two ingredients that have entered our daily diet without adding much, if any, nutritional value. </p> <br><br><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Artificial sweeteners include sugar alcohols, aspartame, cyclamate, saccharin and sucralose. Most are safe within acceptable daily intake limits, but some should be avoided during pregnancy or if there is a pre-existing medical condition.</li><li>Caffeine is a drug that can be found in coffee, tea, cola beverages, energy drinks, chocolate and some medicines.</li><li>As it is a stimulant, acceptable daily intake limits range from 45 mg or less for children aged four to six to 2.5 mg per kilogram of body weight for teens.<br></li></ul><h2>Artificial sweeteners</h2><p> <a href="http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/addit/sweeten-edulcor/index-eng.php" target="_blank">Health Canada</a> groups artificial sweeteners under food additives. They have become more popular in recent decades because they sweeten food without causing tooth decay or weight gain. However, like other additives, they must be approved for use in Canada.</p><p>Health Canada provides an estimate for the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of sweeteners (see table below). This is the amount that a person can consume each day over a lifetime without any harmful effects. In reality, most of us consume well below the ADI.</p><table class="akh-table" style="height:510px;"><thead><tr><th style="width:340px;">Sweetener</th><th style="width:484px;">Forms and uses</th><th style="width:477px;">"Good to know"</th><th style="width:393px;">Acceptable daily intake (ADI)</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width:340px;">Sugar alcohols and polydextrose: <ul><li>names that end in "ol"<br></li><li>isolmalt<br></li><li>hydrogenated starch</li><li>hydrolysates</li></ul></td><td style="width:484px;">Found in cough and cold syrups, other liquid medications and sugar-free gums<br></td><td style="width:477px;"><ul><li>Not sugar or alcohol<br></li><li>Only partly absorbed by the body</li><li>Fewer calories than sugar and no major effect on blood glucose</li></ul></td><td style="width:393px;"> <em>Less than 10 g a day</em> - high levels can cause gas, bloating or diarrhea</td></tr><tr><td style="width:340px;">Acesulfame potassium (Ace-K)</td><td style="width:484px;">Added to food and drinks by food manufacturers, not available to buy as a single ingredient</td><td style="width:477px;"><ul><li>Safe in pregnancy</li></ul></td><td style="width:393px;"> <em>15 mg per kg of body weight</em><br>Presence in food: <ul><li>20 mg in six sugar-free candies</li><li>42 mg in one can of diet pop</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td style="width:340px;">Aspartame<br><em>Brand names:</em> Equal and Nutrasweet</td><td style="width:484px;">Available in packets and added to drinks, yogurts, cereals, low-calorie desserts, chewing gum and many other foods</td><td style="width:477px;"><ul><li>Safe in pregnancy</li><li>Not appropriate for those with PKU (phenylketonuria)</li><li>Flavour may change when heated</li></ul></td><td style="width:393px;"> <em>40 mg per kg of body weight</em> <ul><li>15 mg in 1 tsp Equal</li><li>125 mg in a 355 mL can of diet pop</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td style="width:340px;">Cyclamate<br><em>Brand </em><em></em> <em>names: </em>Sucaryl, Sugar Twin, Sweet 'n' Low</td><td style="width:484px;">Cannot be added to packaged foods and drinks</td><td style="width:477px;"><ul><li>Avoid when pregnant</li><li>Flavour may change when heated</li></ul></td><td style="width:393px;"> <em>11 mg per kg of body weight</em> <ul><li>264 mg in one packet of Sugar Twin</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td style="width:340px;">Saccharin<br><em>Brand name:</em> Hermesetas</td><td style="width:484px;">Cannot be added to packaged foods and drinks</td><td style="width:477px;"><ul><li>Avoid when pregnant</li><li>Available only in pharmacies</li></ul></td><td style="width:393px;"> <em>5 mg per kg of body weight</em> <ul><li>One tablet contains 12 mg</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td style="width:340px;">Sucralose<br><em>Brand name:</em> Splenda</td><td style="width:484px;">Added to packaged foods and drinks</td><td style="width:477px;"><ul><li>Safe in pregnancy</li><li>Can be used for cooking and baking</li></ul></td><td style="width:393px;"> <em>9 mg per kg of body weight</em> <ul><li>One packet has 12 mg</li><li>One cup has 250 mg</li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Natural sweeteners</h2><p>A number of natural sweeteners are available, but they too face restrictions within Canada.</p><ul><li>Stevia, for example, is approved by Health Canada as a non-medicinal ingredient and as a medicinal ingredient in some natural health products.</li><li>Stevia cannot be added to food sold in Canada, but its leaves can be sold, without health claims, to consumers for personal cooking.</li></ul><h2>Caffeine</h2><p>Common sources of caffeine include coffee, tea, cola beverages, energy drinks, chocolate and certain medicine. </p><p>Caffeine is a stimulant drug. For some people, too much caffeine can affect sleep patterns or result in heart palpitations. People's tolerance for caffeine can change throughout their life. It is a good idea to be aware how much caffeine you and your family are getting and to limit caffeine intake, especially for children.<br></p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Age</th><th>Acceptable daily intake (ADI)</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Children age 4 - 6</td><td>No more than 45 mg (one to two 12-oz. (355 mL) cans of cola)</td></tr><tr><td>Children age 7 - 9</td><td>No more than 62.5 mg (one to two 12-oz. (355 mL) cans of cola)</td></tr><tr><td>Children age 7 - 9</td><td>No more than 62.5 mg (one to two 12-oz. (355 mL) cans of cola)</td></tr><tr><td>Children age 10 - 12</td><td>No more than 85 mg (one to two 12-oz. (355 mL) cans of cola)</td></tr><tr><td>Teens (age 13 - 18)</td><td>No more than 2.5 mg of caffeine per kilogram of child's body weight</td></tr><tr><td>Women of childbearing age</td><td>No more than 300 mg (a little over two 8-oz. cups of coffee)</td></tr><tr><td>Other healthy adults</td><td>No more than 400 mg (about three 8-oz. cups of coffee)</td></tr></tbody></table><p></p><p>If you want to consume less caffeine, reduce your intake gradually to help your body adapt. Caffeine is a drug, so you could have uncomfortable side effects if you stop it immediately. If you still like the taste of caffeinated drinks, there are many caffeine-free options that you can switch to.<br></p>Sweeteners and caffeine: Acceptable daily intake

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