Food safetyFFood safetyFood safetyEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn how to prepare, store and cook food safely to minimize the risk of food-borne illness.</p><p>Being informed about the nutrients in your foods will help you to provide a healthy diet for your family, but it is also important to prepare and store food safely to minimize bacteria and any food-borne illness.<br></p> <br><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Wash hands for 20 seconds at a time before and after handling raw meat, seafood or poultry and after sneezing, using the washroom or handling pets.</li><li>Keep food chilled at 4 °C (40 °F) or lower to reduce the risk of food poisoning.</li><li>Refrigerate or freeze all food within two hours of buying or cooking them.</li><li>Follow Health Canada guidelines for chilling and storing meats properly.<br><br></li></ul>
Sécurité alimentaireSSécurité alimentaireFood safetyFrenchNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez comment préparer, entreposer et cuisiner les aliments de manière sécuritaire afin de minimiser les risques de d’empoisonnements alimentaires.<br></p><p>Vous renseigner sur les nutriments présents dans vos aliments vous aidera à offrir un régime alimentaire sain à votre famille, mais il est aussi important de préparer et d’entreposer les aliments de manière sécuritaire afin de minimiser la prolifération des bactéries et d’empoisonnement alimentaire.<br></p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Lavez-vous les mains pendant 20 secondes à la fois avant et après avoir manipulé de la viande, des fruits de mer ou de la volaille crus. Faites de même après avoir éternué, être allé aux toilettes ou avoir touché un animal.</li><li>Conservez les aliments à 4 °C (40 F) ou moins afin de réduire le risque d’empoisonnement alimentaire.</li><li>Réfrigérez ou congelez tous les aliments moins de deux heures après les avoir achetés ou cuisinés.</li><li>Suivez les recommandations du Guide alimentaire canadien concernant la réfrigération et l’entreposage adéquat des viandes.<br></li></ul>

 

 

Food safety1455.00000000000Food safetyFood safetyFEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNA2013-09-27T04:00:00ZTheresa Couto, RD;Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE;Francy Pillo-Blocka RD, FDC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn how to prepare, store and cook food safely to minimize the risk of food-borne illness.</p><p>Being informed about the nutrients in your foods will help you to provide a healthy diet for your family, but it is also important to prepare and store food safely to minimize bacteria and any food-borne illness.<br></p> <br><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Wash hands for 20 seconds at a time before and after handling raw meat, seafood or poultry and after sneezing, using the washroom or handling pets.</li><li>Keep food chilled at 4 °C (40 °F) or lower to reduce the risk of food poisoning.</li><li>Refrigerate or freeze all food within two hours of buying or cooking them.</li><li>Follow Health Canada guidelines for chilling and storing meats properly.<br><br></li></ul><h2>Washing hands</h2><p>Washing your hands is the crucial first step in keeping food safe. Doing this properly, for 20 seconds, removes almost half of all causes of foodborne illness. </p><p>Always wash hands: </p><ul><li>before and after touching raw meat, poultry, fish or seafood </li><li>after using the washroom</li><li>after handling pets</li><li>after sneezing.</li></ul><h2>Chilling food</h2><p>Keep food chilled at 4 °C (40 °F) or lower. Cold temperatures prevent most harmful bacteria from growing and reduce the risk of <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1914&language=English">food poisoning.</a></p><p>There are two key tips for keeping your food chilled. </p><ul><li>Follow the two-hour rule.</li><li>Store meats at the right temperature for the right amount of time.</li></ul><h3>Two-hour rule</h3><p>Under the "two-hour rule", you should refrigerate or freeze all perishables (fresh food that can go bad) within two hours of buying or preparing them. If the weather is hot (warmer than 26 °C), chill or freeze the food within one hour. When you go grocery shopping, buy cold and frozen food last. </p><h3>Storing meat</h3><p>It is essential to chill meats promptly. The table below shows how long you can safely store different types of meat. </p><p>Note: Count the days listed in this table from the date the meat was 'packaged on' (as shown on the label) or the date it was bought if it is from a butcher.</p><table class="akh-table" style="width:726px;"><thead><tr><th style="width:335px;">Food<br></th><th style="width:193px;">Fridge<br></th><th style="width:192px;">Freezer<br></th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width:335px;">Ground meats, poultry, or seafood<br></td><td style="width:193px;">1 day<br></td><td style="width:192px;">2-3 months<br></td></tr><tr><td style="width:335px;">Variety meats (such as liver, kidney, heart)</td><td style="width:193px;">1-2 days</td><td style="width:192px;">3-4 months</td></tr><tr><td style="width:335px;">Stew meat, ribs, stir-fry strips, kabobs</td><td style="width:193px;">2 days</td><td style="width:192px;">3-6 months<br></td></tr><tr><td style="width:335px;">Chicken or turkey (whole or pieces) </td><td style="width:193px;">2-3 days</td><td style="width:192px;">Whole: 12 months<br>Pieces: 6 months</td></tr><tr><td style="width:335px;">Steaks, roasts, chops</td><td style="width:193px;">3 days</td><td style="width:192px;">8-12 months</td></tr><tr><td style="width:335px;">Cooked meats or poultry, cold cuts (open package)</td><td style="width:193px;">3-4 days</td><td style="width:192px;">2-3 months</td></tr><tr><td style="width:335px;">Vacuum packed roasts or steaks (unopened)</td><td style="width:193px;">See package date</td><td style="width:192px;">10-12 months<br></td></tr></tbody></table><p></p><p>You can get many more tips from our article <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1914&language=English">Food poisoning: protecting your family</a>.<br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/food_safety.jpgFood safety

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