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Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccineHHuman papillomavirus (HPV) vaccineHuman papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: What you need to knowEnglishPharmacyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PelvisReproductive systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-04-29T04:00:00ZElly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE00765.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Separate fact from fiction with up-to-date and accurate information on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.</p><p>The <a href="/Article?contentid=25&language=English">human papillomavirus (HPV)</a> is an infection that spreads through sexual intercourse and sexual contact. The HPV vaccine protects against the most common strains of the virus. <br></p><h2>How can the HPV vaccine help protect against HPV? </h2><p>Gardasil protects against four types of HPV: </p> <ul><li>HPV-16 and HPV-18, which cause about 70 percent of all cancers of the cervix</li><li>HPV-6 and HPV-11, which cause about 90 percent of all genital warts </li></ul><p>Gardasil can be prescribed to females between the ages of nine and 45. The vaccine is licensed for use in males age nine to 26. It offers protection against certain cancers of the penis, anus, head and neck. It also protects the partners of males who have had the vaccine. Unfortunately, the cost of the vaccine for boys is not yet funded by most public health programs. </p><p>Cervarix protects against HPV-16 and HPV-18. It is given to females between the ages of 10 and 25. </p><p>Both vaccines require three doses to be given over the course of six months (Cervarix is given at zero, one and six months; Gardasil is given at zero, two and six months). In Canada, one of the vaccines is given to females in school in Grade 4-8, depending on the province (see table below). </p><h2>Important facts about the HPV vaccine</h2><p>There are many common misconceptions about the HPV virus and vaccine. The correct information is provided below so that you have all the facts when discussing sexual health and the HPV vaccine with your child.</p><h3>The HPV vaccine is <em>not</em> a substitute for regular checkups </h3><p>The vaccine protects against some types of HPV that can potentially lead to cancers. Regular checkups with the doctor are still important. About 30% of cervical cancers will not be prevented by the vaccine because it does not cover all HPV strains. Women should continue to be screened for cervical cancer with pap smears, even after getting all three shots of either HPV vaccine. </p><h3>The vaccine <em>cannot </em>treat HPV infections or HPV-related disease </h3><p>HPV vaccine helps prevent HPV-related infections or disease but will not treat an infection. It is most effective in women who are not yet sexually active because they are less likely to have contracted an HPV infection. </p><h3>There is currently <em>no medical cure</em> for the HPV virus </h3><p>Once someone is infected it can take weeks to months before genital warts become apparent. Warts inside the vaginal or anal areas may not be obvious. Some home therapies and other treatments in the doctor's office can be used to treat warts, but none can completely eliminate the virus. Even if the warts disappear, the virus can remain and warts recur. When warts are treated it can take 8 months or longer for them to disappear. </p><h3>HPV vaccines <em>do not </em>protect against other sexually transmitted infections </h3><p>The HPV vaccine protects against genital warts, which is one type of sexually transmitted infection (STI). It cannot protect against all types of STIs, such as HIV, chlamydia, or gonorrhea. It is important to practice safe sex. Parents should advise teens on how to reduce their risk of contracting STIs.<br></p><h3>The HPV vaccine <em>will not</em> make your child more promiscuous </h3><p>There is no evidence that giving the vaccination will increase sexual activity. </p><p>The HPV vaccination is an opportunity for parents to discuss sex and health with their children. <a href="/Article?contentid=718&language=English">Parents should be talking about sex with their children </a>regularly. </p><p>Studies show that sex education does not increase sexual activity. In fact, sex education may decrease early sexual activity, especially if the message encourages delaying sex and having protected sex. </p><h2>Can sexually active females benefit from the vaccine? </h2> <p>The vaccines are most beneficial when given to girls before becoming sexually active. For this reason, doctors usually prescribe HPV vaccines to girls between the ages nine and 13. However, few sexually active women are infected with all types of HPV. For this reason, the vaccine can still help prevent infection and can be given to girls older than 14 years of age. A person with HPV usually has it for life. However, the vaccine can still help prevent recurrences. </p><h2>Is the vaccine protection long-lasting? </h2> <p>Studies show that people exhibit strong immunity against HPV. Scientists do not know exactly how long the vaccine protects again HPV because long-term studies have not been done, but protection is for at least five years. </p><h2>Are the HPV vaccines safe? </h2><p>Studies show both HPV vaccines are safe. For both vaccines, the most common side effect is soreness at the site of injection. This is temporary. </p><p>The only reason not to get the vaccine would be if you have had an allergic reaction to a previous dose of the vaccine or if you are pregnant. </p><p>The vaccines contain particles from part of the virus. They cannot infect you with HPV. The vaccines also do not contain any antibiotics or preservatives, such as mercury or thimerosal. Cervarix contains a new additive called (ASO4). According to Health Canada, ASO4 is safe. </p><p>For more information, visit <a href="http://healthycanadians.gc.ca/health-sante/sexual-sexuelle/hpv-vph-eng.php">Health Canada</a>. </p>
La vaccination contre le virus du papillome humain (VPH)LLa vaccination contre le virus du papillome humain (VPH)Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccineFrenchPharmacyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PelvisReproductive systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-04-29T04:00:00Z​Elly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE​000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Vous pourrez distinguer les mythes de la réalité en vous informant sur le vaccin contre le virus du papillome humain (VPH).<br></p><p>Le <a href="/Article?contentid=25&language=French">virus du papillome humain (VPH)</a> est un virus transmissible par contact sexuel au cours des rapports vaginaux, anaux et buccaux et des attouchements. Le vaccin contre le VPH protège contre les souches les plus courantes.<br></p><h2>Quel type de protection offre la vaccination?<br></h2><p>Le Gardasil​ protège contre quatre souches du VPH :</p><ul><li>les souches VPH-16 et VPH-18, qui causent environ 70 pour cent de tous les cas de cancers du col de l'utérus</li><li>les souches VPH-6 et VPH-11, qui causent environ 90 pour cent de tous les cas de verrues génitales.</li></ul><p>Le Gardasil est autorisé pour les filles et les femmes dans la tranche d'âges de 9 à 45 ans et pour les garçons et les hommes dans la tranche d'âges de 9 à 26 ans. Il offre une protection contre certains cancers du pénis et de l'anus ainsi que de la tête et du cou. Il permet aussi de protéger les partenaires des hommes vaccinés. Malheureusement, la plupart des programmes de santé publique ne prennent pas encore en charge le coût du vaccin chez les garçons.</p><p>Le Cervarix protège contre le VPH-16 et le VPH-18. Il est destiné aux filles et aux femmes dans la tranche d'âges de 10 à 25 ans.</p><p>Les deux marques de vaccins sont administrées en trois doses au cours d'une période de 6 mois (les doses de Cervarix sont administrées à 0, 1 et 6 mois, tandis que les doses de Gardasil sont administrées à 0, 2 et 6 mois). Au Canada, selon la province ou le territoire (voir le tableau ci-dessous), l'un des deux vaccins est administré aux écolières de la 4e année à la 8e année.<br></p><h2>Faits importants concernant la vaccination contre le VPH</h2><p>Il existe de nombreuses idées fausses sur le virus du VPH et le vaccin qui y correspond. L'information correcte est fournie ci-dessous afin que vous ayez tous les faits nécessaires lorsque vous parlez à votre enfant de santé sexuelle et du vaccin contre le VPH.<br></p><h3>La vaccination contre le ​VPH <em>n</em>'est <em>pas</em> un substitut aux contrôles réguliers</h3><p>La vaccination assure une protection contre certaines souches du VPH pouvant éventuellement causer des cancers. Des contrôles réguliers chez le médecin demeurent importants. La vaccination ne permet pas de prévenir environ 30 % des cancers du col de l'utérus étant donné qu'elle n'agit pas sur toutes les souches du virus. Chez les femmes, les dépistages du cancer du col de l'utérus à l'aide de tests PAP doivent se poursuivent même après l'administration des trois doses du vaccin.</p><h3>La vacci​nation ne sert pas au traitement des infections ou des maladies causées par le VPH</h3><p>La vaccination aide à prévenir les infections ou les maladies causées par le VPH mais ne sert pas au traitement des infections au VPH. Son efficacité est à son maximum chez les femmes qui ne sont pas encore actives sexuellement, car celles-ci sont moins susceptibles d'avoir contracté une infection au VPH.</p><h3>Aucun traitement médical <em>ne permet de guérir</em> les infections au V​PH</h3><p>Une fois qu'une personne est infectée, les verrues génitales peuvent prendre des semaines et même des mois avant d'apparaître. Les verrues qui se forment à l'intérieur du vagin ou de l'anus risquent de ne pas être apparentes. Certains traitements qu'on peut faire soi-même ou qui sont effectués chez le médecin peuvent permettre d'éliminer les verrues, mais ils ne permettent pas de supprimer entièrement l'infection virale. Cela veut donc dire que même si les verrues sont éliminées, elles peuvent réapparaître. De plus, lorsque les verrues sont traitées, elles peuvent persister jusqu'à 8 mois et même plus longtemps.</p><h3>La vaccinati​on contre le VPH <em>n'assure aucune protection</em> contre les autres formes d'infections transmissibles sexuellement</h3><p>La vaccination contre le VPH assure une protection contre les verrues génitales, lesquelles constituent un type d'infection transmissible sexuellement (ITS). Elle ne protège pas contre les ITS comme les infections à VIH, à chlamydia ou à gonorrhée. Les pratiques sexuelles sans risque sont importantes. Les parents devraient expliquer à leurs enfants comment réduire les risques d'ITS.</p><h3>La vaccination contre le VPH <em>ne favorisera pas</em> la promiscuité sexuelle chez les enfants</h3><p>Aucune donnée probante ne permet de croire que la vaccination encouragera les rapports sexuels. La vaccination crée une occasion pour les parents de discuter de relations sexuelles et de santé avec leurs enfants. D'ailleurs,<a href="/Article?contentid=718&language=French" target="_blank"> les parents devraient parler de sexualité avec leurs enfants régulièrement</a>.</p><p>Les études démontrent que l'éducation sexuelle n'entraîne aucune hausse de la fréquence des actes sexuels. De fait, elle peut les réduire lorsque les sujets deviennent actifs sexuellement, particulièrement quand on y véhicule l'idée qu'il est préférable de s'abstenir (remettre à plus tard) ou de pratiquer le sexe sans risque. <br></p><h2>Les femmes actives sexuellement peuvent-elles tirer profit de la vaccination?</h2><p>Les effets des vaccins sont les plus bénéfiques chez les filles qui ne sont pas encore actives sexuellement. C'est pourquoi, chez elles, les médecins recommandent habituellement la vaccination contre le VPH à l'âge de 9 à 13 ans. Toutefois, peu de filles et de femmes actives sexuellement sont sujettes aux infections à VPH de toutes souches. Par conséquent, les vaccins aident tout de même à prévenir les infections et peuvent être administrés chez les filles à compter de 14 ans. Même si chez les personnes infectées, le VPH persiste généralement la vie durant, la vaccination permet de prévenir les récidives.<br></p><h2>La protection vaccinale est-elle durable?</h2><p>Des études montrent que les personnes présentent une forte immunité contre le VPH. Les scientifiques ne savent pas exactement combien de temps le vaccin protège contre le VPH, car des études à long terme n’ont pas été réalisées, mais la protection dure au moins cinq ans.<br></p><h2>Les vaccins contre le VPH son​t-ils sûrs?</h2><p>Les études démontrent que la vaccination contre le VPH ne comporte aucun danger. Pour les deux vaccins, une douleur provisoire dans la région de l'administration constitue l'effet secondaire le plus courant. Une réaction allergique à une dose des vaccins et la grossesse seraient les seuls motifs valables de refuser la vaccination.</p><p>Les deux vaccins contiennent des particules du virus, mais ils ne présentent aucun risque de transmission. De plus, aucun antibiotique ou agent de conservation comme le mercure et le thimérosal n'entre dans leur composition. Le Cervarix contient le nouvel additif ASO4, qui, selon Santé Canada, est sans danger.<br></p><p>Pour plus de renseignements, consultez le site de <a href="http://canadiensensante.gc.ca/health-sante/sexual-sexuelle/hpv-vph-fra.php" target="_blank">Santé Canada​</a>.<br></p>

 

 

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine151.000000000000Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccineHuman papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: What you need to knowHEnglishPharmacyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PelvisReproductive systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-04-29T04:00:00ZElly Berger, BA, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE00765.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Separate fact from fiction with up-to-date and accurate information on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.</p><p>The <a href="/Article?contentid=25&language=English">human papillomavirus (HPV)</a> is an infection that spreads through sexual intercourse and sexual contact. The HPV vaccine protects against the most common strains of the virus. <br></p><h2>What is human papillomavirus (HPV)? </h2> <p>The <a href="/Article?contentid=25&language=English">human papillomavirus (HPV)</a> is a virus that spreads through sexual intercourse, oral sex, anal sex and also sexual touching (hand to genital contact). HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease in Canada. Most people do not know that they have HPV because they do not have any symptoms. Unfortunately, they can still pass on the virus to their partner. Persistent HPV infection can lead to certain types of cancers. </p> <p>HPV is very common. About one in four Canadians under the age of 25 have HPV. </p> <p>There are many different strains of HPV. The HPV vaccine protects against the four most common strains:<br></p> <ul><li>The strains HPV-6 and HPV-11 cause <a href="/Article?contentid=25&language=English">genital warts</a>.</li> <li>HPV-16 and HPV-18 are the leading cause of cancers of the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus that narrows into a canal and opens into the vagina. These strains can also cause cancers in the penis and anus as well as cancers of the head and neck. </li></ul> <p>In Canada, two vaccines can protect against HPV: Gardasil and Cervarix. </p><h2>How can the HPV vaccine help protect against HPV? </h2><p>Gardasil protects against four types of HPV: </p> <ul><li>HPV-16 and HPV-18, which cause about 70 percent of all cancers of the cervix</li><li>HPV-6 and HPV-11, which cause about 90 percent of all genital warts </li></ul><p>Gardasil can be prescribed to females between the ages of nine and 45. The vaccine is licensed for use in males age nine to 26. It offers protection against certain cancers of the penis, anus, head and neck. It also protects the partners of males who have had the vaccine. Unfortunately, the cost of the vaccine for boys is not yet funded by most public health programs. </p><p>Cervarix protects against HPV-16 and HPV-18. It is given to females between the ages of 10 and 25. </p><p>Both vaccines require three doses to be given over the course of six months (Cervarix is given at zero, one and six months; Gardasil is given at zero, two and six months). In Canada, one of the vaccines is given to females in school in Grade 4-8, depending on the province (see table below). </p><h2>Important facts about the HPV vaccine</h2><p>There are many common misconceptions about the HPV virus and vaccine. The correct information is provided below so that you have all the facts when discussing sexual health and the HPV vaccine with your child.</p><h3>The HPV vaccine is <em>not</em> a substitute for regular checkups </h3><p>The vaccine protects against some types of HPV that can potentially lead to cancers. Regular checkups with the doctor are still important. About 30% of cervical cancers will not be prevented by the vaccine because it does not cover all HPV strains. Women should continue to be screened for cervical cancer with pap smears, even after getting all three shots of either HPV vaccine. </p><h3>The vaccine <em>cannot </em>treat HPV infections or HPV-related disease </h3><p>HPV vaccine helps prevent HPV-related infections or disease but will not treat an infection. It is most effective in women who are not yet sexually active because they are less likely to have contracted an HPV infection. </p><h3>There is currently <em>no medical cure</em> for the HPV virus </h3><p>Once someone is infected it can take weeks to months before genital warts become apparent. Warts inside the vaginal or anal areas may not be obvious. Some home therapies and other treatments in the doctor's office can be used to treat warts, but none can completely eliminate the virus. Even if the warts disappear, the virus can remain and warts recur. When warts are treated it can take 8 months or longer for them to disappear. </p><h3>HPV vaccines <em>do not </em>protect against other sexually transmitted infections </h3><p>The HPV vaccine protects against genital warts, which is one type of sexually transmitted infection (STI). It cannot protect against all types of STIs, such as HIV, chlamydia, or gonorrhea. It is important to practice safe sex. Parents should advise teens on how to reduce their risk of contracting STIs.<br></p><h3>The HPV vaccine <em>will not</em> make your child more promiscuous </h3><p>There is no evidence that giving the vaccination will increase sexual activity. </p><p>The HPV vaccination is an opportunity for parents to discuss sex and health with their children. <a href="/Article?contentid=718&language=English">Parents should be talking about sex with their children </a>regularly. </p><p>Studies show that sex education does not increase sexual activity. In fact, sex education may decrease early sexual activity, especially if the message encourages delaying sex and having protected sex. </p><h2>Can sexually active females benefit from the vaccine? </h2> <p>The vaccines are most beneficial when given to girls before becoming sexually active. For this reason, doctors usually prescribe HPV vaccines to girls between the ages nine and 13. However, few sexually active women are infected with all types of HPV. For this reason, the vaccine can still help prevent infection and can be given to girls older than 14 years of age. A person with HPV usually has it for life. However, the vaccine can still help prevent recurrences. </p><h2>Is the vaccine protection long-lasting? </h2> <p>Studies show that people exhibit strong immunity against HPV. Scientists do not know exactly how long the vaccine protects again HPV because long-term studies have not been done, but protection is for at least five years. </p><h2>Are the HPV vaccines safe? </h2><p>Studies show both HPV vaccines are safe. For both vaccines, the most common side effect is soreness at the site of injection. This is temporary. </p><p>The only reason not to get the vaccine would be if you have had an allergic reaction to a previous dose of the vaccine or if you are pregnant. </p><p>The vaccines contain particles from part of the virus. They cannot infect you with HPV. The vaccines also do not contain any antibiotics or preservatives, such as mercury or thimerosal. Cervarix contains a new additive called (ASO4). According to Health Canada, ASO4 is safe. </p><p>For more information, visit <a href="http://healthycanadians.gc.ca/health-sante/sexual-sexuelle/hpv-vph-eng.php">Health Canada</a>. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.pngHuman papillomavirus (HPV) vaccineHuman papillomavirus (HPV) vaccineFalseHuman papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine

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