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Bone marrow and the immune systemBBone marrow and the immune systemBone marrow and the immune systemEnglishHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNAAdult (19+)NA2010-02-12T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds7.0000000000000067.0000000000000552.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Parents can learn about bone marrow and the immune system, as they prepare for their child's blood and marrow transplant (BMT).</p><p>Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside our bones. All bones in newborn babies have active marrow, which means they are producing new marrow cells. By the time your child reaches young adulthood, the marrow inside the bones of the hands, feet, arms, and legs stop producing new marrow cells. In adults, active marrow is found inside the spine, hip and shoulder bones, ribs, breastbone, and skull. However, bone marrow found in the spine and hip has the richest source of bone marrow cells.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Bone marrow</span><img src="http://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Bone_marrow_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Bone marrow is contained within bones. All blood cells are produced in the bone marrow. </figcaption></figure> <h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones that produces blood cells.</li> <li>Bone marrow produces red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells.</li> <li>Lymphocytes are produced in the marrow, and play an important part in the body's immune system.</li></ul>
Moelle osseuse et le système immunitaireMMoelle osseuse et le système immunitaireBone marrow and the immune systemFrenchHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNAAdult (19+)NA2010-02-12T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAP Christine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds7.0000000000000067.0000000000000552.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Les parents en apprendront davantage sur la moelle osseuse et le système immunitaire, dans le cadre de leur préparation à la greffe de sang et de moelle osseuse (GSM) de leur enfant.</p><p>La moelle osseuse est le tissu spongieux qui se trouve dans les os. Tous les os des nouveau-nés possèdent une moelle osseuse active, ce qui veut dire qu’ils produisent de nouvelles cellules de moelle osseuse. Une fois que votre enfant aura atteint l’âge adulte, la moelle osseuse dans les os des mains, des pieds, des bras et des jambes cesse de produire des nouvelles cellules de moelle osseuse. Chez les adultes, la moelle osseuse active se trouve dans les os de la colonne vertébrale, de la hanche et des épaules, des côtes, du sternum et du crâne. Cependant, la moelle osseuse qui se trouve dans les os de la colonne et des hanches est celle qui contient la source la plus riche de cellules de moelle osseuse.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>La moelle osseuse est le tissu spongieux qui se trouve dans l’os et qui produit les cellules sanguines.</li> <li>La moelle osseuse produit les globules rouges, les plaquettes et les globules blancs.</li> <li>Les lymphocytes sont produits dans la moelle osseuse et jouent un rôle important dans le système immunitaire de l’organisme.</li></ul>

 

 

Bone marrow and the immune system1511.00000000000Bone marrow and the immune systemBone marrow and the immune systemBEnglishHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNAAdult (19+)NA2010-02-12T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds7.0000000000000067.0000000000000552.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Parents can learn about bone marrow and the immune system, as they prepare for their child's blood and marrow transplant (BMT).</p><p>Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside our bones. All bones in newborn babies have active marrow, which means they are producing new marrow cells. By the time your child reaches young adulthood, the marrow inside the bones of the hands, feet, arms, and legs stop producing new marrow cells. In adults, active marrow is found inside the spine, hip and shoulder bones, ribs, breastbone, and skull. However, bone marrow found in the spine and hip has the richest source of bone marrow cells.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Bone marrow</span><img src="http://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Bone_marrow_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Bone marrow is contained within bones. All blood cells are produced in the bone marrow. </figcaption></figure> <h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones that produces blood cells.</li> <li>Bone marrow produces red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells.</li> <li>Lymphocytes are produced in the marrow, and play an important part in the body's immune system.</li></ul><h2>What does the marrow do?</h2><p>Our bone marrow produces blood cells, called red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells.</p><p>Inside the marrow, blood cells start off as young, immature cells called stem cells. Once they develop, blood cells do not live for a long time inside our bodies. This is why our marrow continuously produces all three types of blood cells to keep us healthy.</p><h2>Red blood cells</h2><p>These cells are red because they are filled with a protein called haemoglobin. Oxygen and carbon dioxide attach to the iron that is in haemoglobin, allowing the red blood cell to transport oxygen to the body. The red blood cells also get rid of carbon dioxide which leaves your body through the lungs when you breathe out.</p><h2>Platelets</h2><p>Platelets are blood cells that help the blood coagulate (stick together) to help stop bleeding at sites on the body that have been cut or injured. Platelets form the scab that is formed over a small cut.</p><h2>White blood cells</h2><p>White blood cells help the body fight against infection. There are many different types of white blood cells, which include:</p><ul><li>Lymphocytes, neutrophils, and monocytes. These white blood cells fight against invading bacteria, viruses, or fungi to help destroy infection. Each of these cells differs in appearance.</li><li>Eosinophils and basophils. These white blood cells respond to allergens that can invade our bodies.</li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">The components of blood</span><img src="http://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Blood_components_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Blood is made up of red blood cells, platelets, and different kinds of white blood cells. These cells are all suspended in liquid plasma.</figcaption></figure> <h2>Immune system</h2><p>Our immune system protects the body from disease. It kills unwanted micro-organisms such as bacteria and viruses that may invade our bodies.</p><h3>How does our immune system fight against infection?</h3><p>Small glands called lymph nodes are scattered throughout the body. Once made inside our marrow, lymphocytes enter the lymph nodes.</p><p>The lymphocytes travel between each node through channels called lymphatics. The lymphatic channels meet at large ducts that empty into a blood vessel. Lymphocytes enter the blood through these ducts.</p><p>There are three major types of lymphocytes which play an important part of the immune system</p><h3>B-lymphocytes (B-cells)</h3><p>These cells originate in the bone marrow. They make proteins called antibodies which attach onto the surface of infection-causing microbes. Generally, these are Y or T shaped. Each type of antibody reacts to different microbes by sticking to molecules, called antigens, which sit on the surface of the microbe. It is this antibody-antigen binding that triggers B-cells to grow and produce more antibodies, which fight infection.</p><h3>T-lymphocytes (T-cells)</h3><p>These cells mature in the thymus, which is a small organ in the upper chest, just behind the sternum (breastbone). T-cells help B-cells make antibodies against invading bacteria, viruses, or other microbes. Unlike B-cells, T-cells engulf and destroy pathogens directly, after binding to the antigen on the surface of the microbe.</p><h3>Natural killer (NK) cells</h3><p>These are a type of lymphocyte that directly attacks cells which have been infected by a virus.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Blood_components_MED_ILL_EN.jpgBone marrow and the immune systemFalse

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