Chemotherapy for blood and marrow transplantCChemotherapy for blood and marrow transplantChemotherapy for blood and marrow transplantEnglishHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAP Christine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds9.0000000000000054.0000000000000706.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about chemotherapy your child receives before the blood and marrow transplant.</p><p>To help prepare your child for their blood and marrow transplant (BMT), doctors will start your child on high-dose chemotherapy as soon as possible.</p> <p>Sometimes standard dosages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are not enough to cure a child’s disease. Higher doses of chemotherapeutic medicines may be more likely to cure the disease. Destroying all the diseased and healthy stem cells also makes room for the transplanted cells. </p> <p>However, such high doses also destroy your child’s healthy blood stem cells. This makes your child very susceptible to infection. Because your child receives intensive chemotherapy, they are hospitalized during the entire conditioning phase. This way, the health care team can provide optimal care and support for your child. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The doctor gives your child chemotherapy drugs according to a schedule for each cycle, specific to your child's condition and type of transplant.</li> <li>Your child may experience side effects from chemotherapy, depending on the type of drugs they are taking.</li> <li>The team of nurses and doctors will closely monitor your child while they are undergoing chemotherapy.</li> <li>After finishing chemotherapy, your child will need to take antibiotics for three to six months to prevent infection.</li></ul>
Chimiothérapie pour greffes de sang et de moelle osseuseCChimiothérapie pour greffes de sang et de moelle osseuseChemotherapy for blood and marrow transplantFrenchHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds9.0000000000000054.0000000000000706.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprendrez davantage sur les traitements de chimiothérapie que votre enfant recevra avant la greffe.</p><p>Pour préparer votre enfant pour sa greffe de sang et de moelle osseuse (GSM), les médecins entreprendront un protocole de chimiothérapie à dose élevée aussi tôt que possible.</p> <p>Parfois, les doses standards de chimiothérapie et de radiothérapie ne suffisent pas à guérir la maladie d’un enfant. Des doses plus élevées de médicaments de chimiothérapie pourraient être plus susceptibles de guérir la maladie. La destruction de toutes les cellules souches malades et saines laisse aussi de la place aux cellules de la greffe. </p> <p>Cependant, les doses élevées détruisent aussi les cellules souches saines de votre enfant, ce qui le rend très susceptible aux infections. Étant donné que votre enfant reçoit des traitements de chimiothérapie intensifs, il sera hospitalisé pendant la phase de conditionnement complète. De cette manière, l’équipe soignante pourra lui offrir des soins et du soutien optimaux. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Pour chaque cycle, le médecin donne à votre enfant des médicaments de chimiothérapie selon un horaire adapté à son état et au type de greffe.</li> <li>Votre enfant peut éprouver des effets secondaires de la chimiothérapie selon le type de médicaments qu’il prend.</li> <li>L’équipe d’infirmiers et de médecins surveillera de près votre enfant pendant qu’il reçoit ses traitements de chimiothérapie.</li> <li>Une fois la chimiothérapie terminée, votre enfant aura besoin de prendre des antibiotiques pendant trois à six mois pour prévenir l’infection.</li></ul>

 

 

Chemotherapy for blood and marrow transplant1527.00000000000Chemotherapy for blood and marrow transplantChemotherapy for blood and marrow transplantCEnglishHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAP Christine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds9.0000000000000054.0000000000000706.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about chemotherapy your child receives before the blood and marrow transplant.</p><p>To help prepare your child for their blood and marrow transplant (BMT), doctors will start your child on high-dose chemotherapy as soon as possible.</p> <p>Sometimes standard dosages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are not enough to cure a child’s disease. Higher doses of chemotherapeutic medicines may be more likely to cure the disease. Destroying all the diseased and healthy stem cells also makes room for the transplanted cells. </p> <p>However, such high doses also destroy your child’s healthy blood stem cells. This makes your child very susceptible to infection. Because your child receives intensive chemotherapy, they are hospitalized during the entire conditioning phase. This way, the health care team can provide optimal care and support for your child. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The doctor gives your child chemotherapy drugs according to a schedule for each cycle, specific to your child's condition and type of transplant.</li> <li>Your child may experience side effects from chemotherapy, depending on the type of drugs they are taking.</li> <li>The team of nurses and doctors will closely monitor your child while they are undergoing chemotherapy.</li> <li>After finishing chemotherapy, your child will need to take antibiotics for three to six months to prevent infection.</li></ul><h2>How is chemotherapy given?</h2> <p>There are several different ways to give chemotherapy. This depends on the type of illness your child has, and on the medicine your child is taking. </p> <p>The doctor gives your child chemotherapy drugs according to a schedule or timetable for each cycle or phase. You may hear your doctor refer to this as the “protocol.” The protocols are specific to your child’s condition and type of transplant (allogenic versus autologous). </p> <h2>Routes of administration</h2> <p>Your child is given chemotherapy intravenously (IV). The drugs are delivered through a needle directly into the central line. This is the most common way to give chemotherapy.</p> <h2>Medicines your child takes during chemotherapy</h2> <p>The specific protocol will vary depending on what type of illness your child has, and the type of BMT they receive.</p> <p>Your child’s conditioning chemotherapy regimen may include the following medicines:</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=88&language=English">busulfan</a>, IV</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=113&language=English">cyclophosphamide</a>, IV</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=134&language=English">etoposide</a>, IV</li></ul> <p>For more information, please see <a href="/Article?contentid=1535&language=English">Medicines and Side Effects</a>.</p> <h2>Short-term side effects of chemotherapy</h2> <p>Some medicines have unwanted effects on the body. These are called side effects. The side effects from chemotherapy drugs depend on the type of drugs, the dose of drug and your child’s reaction. Some children may not have any side effects.</p> <h2>Bleeding and infection</h2> <p>Chemotherapy medicines can also make it difficult for the bone marrow to produce normal blood cells. If this happens, your child becomes prone to infections, bleeding, and developing anemia. Children who receive a more intense treatment are at a greater risk of developing these side effects. To protect against these possible risks, your child’s treatment team will provide the necessary supportive care, such as:</p> <ul> <li>antibiotics </li> <li>antifungal drugs </li> <li>red blood cell and platelet transfusions </li></ul> <h2>Fever</h2> <p>Treatment commonly causes fever in children. Sometimes, this fever is associated with a decrease in white blood cells which causes a condition called neutropenia, in which the immune system is weakened. This makes a child prone to bacterial infection.</p> <h2>Other side effects during chemotherapy</h2> <p>While on chemotherapy, your child may experience:</p> <ul> <li>nausea or vomiting. Medications like <a href="/Article?contentid=205&language=English">ondansetron​</a>, ganisetron, dimenhydrinate (Gravol®), or <a href="/Article?contentid=176&language=English">lorazepam​</a> (Ativan®) can usually help. </li> <li>fatigue </li> <li>headaches </li> <li>loss of appetite </li> <li>sore mouth or throat (mucositis) </li> <li>diarrhea or constipation </li> <li>taste changes </li> <li>pain and damage to the ends of nerves in hands, feet, or jaw (neuropathy)</li> <li>seizures, rarely </li> <li>blood clots (thrombosis), rarely</li></ul> <h2>Monitoring while your child is on chemotherapy</h2> <p>While your child is being treated, nurses will draw blood frequently. The physician will also examine your child every day. </p> <h2>Using antibiotics after finishing chemotherapy</h2> <p>Chemotherapy weakens your child’s immune system, making them prone to infection. When this happens, your child may develop pneumonia, called pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). It is caused by the fungal organism <em>Pneumocystis jiroveci</em>. This fungus is normally present on our lungs, but it does not cause any disease in healthy people because their immune systems are functioning well. </p> <p>To prevent your child from becoming infected, the doctor gives them an antibiotic called co-trimoxazole (Septra®). It is usually given by mouth in a tablet or liquid form, once or twice a day, three days a week throughout treatment. Your child continues to take the medicine for three or six months after they finish treatment.</p> <p>Septra is currently the best way to protect against PCP. However, some children cannot tolerate Septra very well. If your child experiences side effects or allergies to the medicine, they can take one of the following:</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=119&language=English">dapsone</a>, which is taken by mouth </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=213&language=English">pentamidine​</a>, which is either inhaled or given by IV</li></ul>Chemotherapy for blood and marrow transplant

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