Feeding and nutrition for blood and marrow transplantsFFeeding and nutrition for blood and marrow transplantsFeeding and nutrition for blood and marrow transplantsEnglishHaematology;Immunology;Oncology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2009-12-08T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds8.0000000000000067.0000000000000432.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about nutrition and how to store and handle food after your child's blood and marrow transplant.</p><p>Before your child’s blood and marrow transplant (BMT), doctors first destroyed all of your child's abnormal bone marrow cells. They did this by giving high-dose chemotherapy, with or without <a href="/Article?contentid=1528&language=English">total body irradiation</a> (TBI). Both of these therapies put a lot of strain on the body’s organs and tissues. </p><p>To help repair the damage on any organ and tissue and fight fever, your child needs to eat more protein and calories after the transplant. Eating nutritious food will help keep the new marrow cells healthy. It is important that your child increases their calorie intake at least 30 to 50 days after the transplant.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>After a BMT, your child will need up to 50% to 60% more calories and twice as much protein.</li><li>Your child will be placed on a restricted diet to minimize the risk of infection.</li><li>If your child is unable to eat on their own, they may be given a nutrition mixture called total parenteral nutrition (TPN).</li></ul>
Alimentation et nutrition pour les greffes de sang et de moelle osseuseAAlimentation et nutrition pour les greffes de sang et de moelle osseuseFeeding and nutrition for blood and marrow transplantsFrenchHaematology;Immunology;Oncology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2009-12-08T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds8.0000000000000067.0000000000000432.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprendrez davantage au sujet de la nutrition et comment entreposer et manipuler des aliments après la greffe de sang et de moelle osseuse de votre enfant.</p><p>Avant la greffe de sang et de moelle osseuse de votre enfant (GSM), les médecins ont d’abord détruit toutes les cellules de moelle osseuse anormales de votre enfant. Ils ont fait cela en lui administrant de la chimiothérapie à dose élevée, avec ou sans <a href="/Article?contentid=1528&language=French">irradiation totale</a>. Ces deux traitements exercent une énorme contrainte sur les organes et les tissus du corps. </p><p>Pour réparer les dommages faits aux organes et tissus et pour combattre la fièvre, votre enfant devra manger plus de protéines et de calories après sa greffe. Manger des aliments nutritifs gardera les nouvelles cellules de moelle osseuse en santé. Il importe que l’enfant augmente son apport en calories pendant au moins 30 à 50 jours après la greffe.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Après une greffe de sang et de moelle osseuse, votre enfant aura besoin de 50 % à 60 % plus de calories et deux fois plus de protéines.</li><li>Votre enfant recevra un régime alimentaire restreint pour minimiser le risque d’infection.</li><li>S’il est incapable de manger par lui-même, il pourra devoir prendre un mélange nutritionnel appelé alimentation parentérale totale.</li></ul>

 

 

Feeding and nutrition for blood and marrow transplants1545.00000000000Feeding and nutrition for blood and marrow transplantsFeeding and nutrition for blood and marrow transplantsFEnglishHaematology;Immunology;Oncology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2009-12-08T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds8.0000000000000067.0000000000000432.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about nutrition and how to store and handle food after your child's blood and marrow transplant.</p><p>Before your child’s blood and marrow transplant (BMT), doctors first destroyed all of your child's abnormal bone marrow cells. They did this by giving high-dose chemotherapy, with or without <a href="/Article?contentid=1528&language=English">total body irradiation</a> (TBI). Both of these therapies put a lot of strain on the body’s organs and tissues. </p><p>To help repair the damage on any organ and tissue and fight fever, your child needs to eat more protein and calories after the transplant. Eating nutritious food will help keep the new marrow cells healthy. It is important that your child increases their calorie intake at least 30 to 50 days after the transplant.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>After a BMT, your child will need up to 50% to 60% more calories and twice as much protein.</li><li>Your child will be placed on a restricted diet to minimize the risk of infection.</li><li>If your child is unable to eat on their own, they may be given a nutrition mixture called total parenteral nutrition (TPN).</li></ul><p>Compared to children who are the same age and sex, your child may need to eat:</p><ul><li>up to 50% to 60% more calories </li><li>twice as much protein</li></ul><p>Every day, the nurse will count how many calories your child is taking in to make sure they are getting enough nutrients. Tell your nurse about what your child is eating and drinking. Encourage your child to eat and drink, even in small amounts to keep their digestive system working well.</p><p>After your child’s transplant, they will be placed on a restricted diet to minimize any risk of infection. This diet is called the low-bacteria diet. It is not difficult to follow, but it does require your child to avoid certain foods, especially if it is handled by others (for example, take-out restaurants).</p><h2>Food brought to the hospital and storing food</h2><ul><li>Never store food at room temperature for longer than two hours.</li><li>Seal and wrap any food you store in the patient fridge. Label it with the date and time when you stored it. Always use refrigerated foods within 24 hours, or the “best before” date.</li><li>Food prepared from home is allowed inside your child’s hospital room, as long as it is completely cooked, transported and stored properly.</li><li>Food that is commercially prepared and packaged is always allowed. </li><li>Please follow the <a href="/Article?contentid=1546&language=English">low bacteria diet guidelines</a> before bringing food from home.</li></ul><h2>Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN)</h2><p>There might be times when your child may not feel well enough to eat. <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">Vomiting</a> or <a href="/article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> can make it difficult for your child to tolerate food. To make sure your child continues to get enough nutrients, the nurse will deliver a special mixture of nutrients, which contains:</p><ul><li>protein </li><li>fat</li><li>sugar</li><li>vitamins and minerals </li></ul><p>This nutrition mixture is called the Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN). The nurse delivers this TPN through your child’s central line into the blood stream. Your child can drink and eat while they receive TPN. However, do not force your child to eat or drink if they are feeling unwell. </p>Feeding and nutrition for blood and marrow transplants

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