Bleeding after a blood and marrow transplantBBleeding after a blood and marrow transplantBleeding after a blood and marrow transplantEnglishHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2010-01-06T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAP Christine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds7.0000000000000072.0000000000000204.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Information for parents about bleeding, a possible complication which may occur after a child's blood and marrow transplant (BMT).</p><p>Before your child’s transplant, they are treated with chemotherapy and radiation to destroy the diseased bone marrow cells. The treatment also destroys a type of blood cell that prevents heavy bleeding, called platelets. Platelets make blood clot to close up wounds at a site of injury or cut on the body. When our bodies do not have enough platelets, we are more prone to bleeding. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Chemotherapy and radiation treatment destroy platelets, which form blood clots.</li> <li>The most common problem is nosebleeds.</li> <li>Platelet and haemoglobin cells will be monitored daily and a transfusion may be given if counts are too low.</li></ul>
HémorragiesHHémorragiesBleeding after a blood and marrow transplantFrenchHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2010-01-06T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAP Christine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds7.0000000000000072.0000000000000204.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Vous trouverez ici de l’information pour les parents sur les hémorragies, une complication possible qui peut survenir après une greffe de sang et de moelle osseuse (GSM).</p><p>Avant de recevoir sa greffe, votre enfant sera traité au moyen de chimiothérapie et de radiothérapie qui détruira les cellules de moelle osseuse malades. Le traitement détruit cependant aussi un type de cellules sanguines qui préviennent les saignements abondants, appelé plaquettes. Les plaquettes fabriquent des caillots sanguins qui ferment le site d’une blessure ou d’une coupure sur le corps. Si notre corps n’a pas assez de plaquettes, nous sommes plus propices aux saignements.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les traitements de chimiothérapie et de radiothérapie détruisent les plaquettes qui forment les caillots de sang.</li> <li>Le problème le plus courant est le saignement de nez.</li> <li>On vérifiera tous les jours la quantité de plaquettes et d’hémoglobine présentes et une transfusion pourra être donnée si leur nombre est trop faible.</li></ul>

 

 

Bleeding after a blood and marrow transplant1549.00000000000Bleeding after a blood and marrow transplantBleeding after a blood and marrow transplantBEnglishHaematology;Immunology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2010-01-06T05:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAP Christine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds7.0000000000000072.0000000000000204.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Information for parents about bleeding, a possible complication which may occur after a child's blood and marrow transplant (BMT).</p><p>Before your child’s transplant, they are treated with chemotherapy and radiation to destroy the diseased bone marrow cells. The treatment also destroys a type of blood cell that prevents heavy bleeding, called platelets. Platelets make blood clot to close up wounds at a site of injury or cut on the body. When our bodies do not have enough platelets, we are more prone to bleeding. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Chemotherapy and radiation treatment destroy platelets, which form blood clots.</li> <li>The most common problem is nosebleeds.</li> <li>Platelet and haemoglobin cells will be monitored daily and a transfusion may be given if counts are too low.</li></ul><h2>Where does bleeding occur?</h2> <p>Bleeding can occur from any part of the body. The most common problem is nosebleeds. If your child has a nosebleed, your nurse will help your child to stop the bleeding. </p> <h2>How is it treated? </h2> <p>Your child’s nurse will monitor the amount of platelet or haemoglobin cells in your child every day. If either count is too low, the nurse will give your child a transfusion of platelets or red blood cells. This is very common after the transplant procedure, and your child may need platelet transfusions every few days. </p> <p>Pressure to the bleeding area can also help. If there is a serious nosebleed, an Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) surgeon will pack a type of gauze around your child’s nose to stop the bleeding. </p>Bleeding after a blood and marrow transplant

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.