AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Bone health after an allogeneic blood and marrow transplantBBone health after an allogeneic blood and marrow transplantBone health after an allogeneic blood and marrow transplantEnglishHaematology;Immunology;Oncology;Orthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNATeen (13-18 years) Adult (19+)NA2010-03-19T04:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds9.0000000000000059.0000000000000367.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how your child can keep their bones strong after a blood and bone marrow transplant.</p><p>If your child develops the immune complication called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) they will take a steroid called prednisone. This medicine is also given before your child’s transplant to minimize the chances of developing GVHD. Taking prednisone over a long period of time can affect the growth of healthy bone cells.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Steroids can damage the joints by interrupting the blood supply, causing a condition called osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis.</li><li>Steroids can also make bones weaker by causing them to become less dense; when bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, it increases the chances of the bones breaking.</li><li>Keeping up with regular follow-up appointments is important to detect any early signs of bone damage.</li></ul>
Santé des os après une greffe allogéniqueSSanté des os après une greffe allogéniqueBone health after an allogeneic blood and marrow transplantFrenchHaematology;Immunology;Oncology;Orthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNATeen (13-18 years) Adult (19+)NA2010-03-19T04:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds9.0000000000000059.0000000000000367.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprendrez comment votre enfant peut garder des os sains après avoir survécu à une greffe.</p><p>Si votre enfant développe la complication du système immunitaire appelée maladie du greffon contre l’hôte (MGCH), il prendra un stéroïde appelé prednisone. Ce médicament est aussi administré avant la greffe de votre enfant pour réduire au minimum les chances de développer la MGCH. Cependant, la prise de prednisone sur une longue période peut modifier la croissance de cellules osseuses saines.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Les stéroïdes peuvent endommager les articulations en interrompant l’approvisionnement en sang, provoquant une maladie appelée ostéonécrose ou nécrose avasculaire.</li><li>Les stéroïdes peuvent aussi affaiblir les os en réduisant leur densité; lorsque la teneur minérale de l’os est réduite, il y a un risque accru que les os se rompent.</li><li>Il est important de vous présenter aux rendez-vous de suivi réguliers en vue de la détection des premiers signes d’une lésion osseuse.</li></ul>

 

 

Bone health after an allogeneic blood and marrow transplant1571.00000000000Bone health after an allogeneic blood and marrow transplantBone health after an allogeneic blood and marrow transplantBEnglishHaematology;Immunology;Oncology;Orthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNATeen (13-18 years) Adult (19+)NA2010-03-19T04:00:00ZJohn Doyle, MD, FRCPC, FAAPChristine Armstrong, RN, MScN, NP Peds9.0000000000000059.0000000000000367.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how your child can keep their bones strong after a blood and bone marrow transplant.</p><p>If your child develops the immune complication called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) they will take a steroid called prednisone. This medicine is also given before your child’s transplant to minimize the chances of developing GVHD. Taking prednisone over a long period of time can affect the growth of healthy bone cells.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Steroids can damage the joints by interrupting the blood supply, causing a condition called osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis.</li><li>Steroids can also make bones weaker by causing them to become less dense; when bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, it increases the chances of the bones breaking.</li><li>Keeping up with regular follow-up appointments is important to detect any early signs of bone damage.</li></ul><h2>Damage to joints</h2><p>Steroids can damage the joints by interrupting the blood supply, causing a condition called osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis. When our bones do not receive enough blood, bone tissue starts to die off. If your child complains of pain in the joints – mostly in the knees and hips – or develops a limp, contact your child's doctor right away.</p> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">Osteonecrosis</span><img src="http://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Osteonecrosis_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">There</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> are many blood vessels that supply blood to the hip joint. In osteonecrosis, the blood supply to the bones is disrupted. This causes the bone tissues to die. Osteonecrosis is also called avascular necrosis.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Weaker bones</h2><p>Steroids can also make bones weaker by causing them to become less dense. As bones get thinner, they lose important minerals such as calcium, which we need to keep our bones strong. The amount of minerals for every square centimetre of bone is an important measure of how strong they are. This is called bone mineral density (BMD). If your child’s BMD reduces, it increases the chance of their bones breaking (fractures). <br></p><h2>What can be done to help maintain healthy bones?</h2><p>Keeping up with regular follow-up appointments is important to detect any early signs of bone damage. Doctors check for any signs of osteonecrosis and reduced BMD. This can help in early prevention, since sometimes the doctor can see the signs before they start to worsen and interfere with your child’s mobility.</p><p>Making healthy lifestyle choices can minimize the likelihood of your child developing problems with their bones later on after treatment. Encourage your child to:</p><ul><li>do weight-bearing exercises, which mean that your feet and body support your body’s weight. This includes hiking, push-ups, walking, climbing stairs, and bicycling.</li><li>eat foods with calcium and vitamin D, which are important vitamins for bone health. This can include milk products (cheese and yoghurt), fish, liver, eggs, spinach, collard greens, and baked beans. Your child can take supplements if they have trouble getting enough vitamins through diet alone.</li><li>avoid smoking, alcohol, and excess caffeine. These can make deficiencies in bone density worse.</li></ul><p>If pain becomes an issue for your child, physical therapists and doctors that specialize in pain management can help.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Osteonecrosis_MED_ILL_EN.pngBone health after an allogeneic blood and marrow transplant

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.