BloodBBloodBloodEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years);Adult (19+)HeartCardiovascular systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000067.00000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about blood, blood components, and blood types.<br></p><p> This page explains how blood allows for the body to function.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Blood carries oxygen to various places in our body and brings carbon dioxide to the lungs so it can be exhaled.</li> <li>Blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and plasma.</li> <li>There are four major blood types: A, B, AB, and O.</li> <li>Different blood types cannot be mixed together.</li></ul>
Fonction du sang dans le coeurFFonction du sang dans le coeurFunction of Blood in the HeartFrenchCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years);Adult (19+)HeartCardiovascular systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000067.00000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez le sang, ses composants et les groupes sanguins.<br></p><p> Cette page explique la manière dont le sang assure le fonctionnement du corps.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li> Le sang transporte l’oxygène vers différents endroits de notre corps et achemine le dioxyde de carbone vers les poumons afin qu’il puisse être expiré.</li> <li> Il contient des globules rouges, des globules blancs, des plaquettes et du plasma.</li> <li> Il existe quatre groupes sanguins principaux : A, B, AB et O.</li> <li> On ne peut pas mélanger des groupes sanguins différents.</li> </ul>

 

 

Blood1578.00000000000BloodBloodBEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years);Adult (19+)HeartCardiovascular systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000067.00000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about blood, blood components, and blood types.<br></p><p> This page explains how blood allows for the body to function.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Blood carries oxygen to various places in our body and brings carbon dioxide to the lungs so it can be exhaled.</li> <li>Blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and plasma.</li> <li>There are four major blood types: A, B, AB, and O.</li> <li>Different blood types cannot be mixed together.</li></ul><h2>What does blood do for the body?</h2><p>Without blood, the body could not function. Blood carries the oxygen we breathe into our lungs to the parts of the body that need it. It also brings carbon dioxide back from the body to the lungs, so that it can be removed when we breathe out. Carbon dioxide is produced when the cells in the body make energy to power the body. </p><p>Blood is made up of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and plasma. </p><h3>Red blood cells</h3><p>Red blood cells are red because they contain a protein called haemoglobin. Oxygen and carbon dioxide attach to the iron in haemoglobin to be transported. The red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body and carry carbon dioxide from the body back to the lungs. Blood rich in oxygen is bright red, while blood with little oxygen in it is blue.</p><p>Your body has millions of red blood cells. Each one lives about 120 days. The bone marrow in the body is constantly making more to refresh your blood, so you always have enough. If you or your child has to give blood, your body or your childs body will simply replace it. </p><h3>White blood cells</h3><p>White blood cells fight off infection in the body. When they detect infection, they either attack by way of antibodies or they surround bacteria and get rid of it. </p><p>White blood cells do not live as long as red blood cells. There are fewer white blood cells than red blood cells, although the body makes more if it is about to battle an infection. </p><h3>Platelets</h3><p>Platelets help blood clot so there is not too much bleeding from a cut or other injury.</p><h3>Plasma</h3><p>Plasma is a clear liquid that makes up over half the blood's volume. It carries the blood cells and platelets around the body.</p><h2>What are the different types of blood?</h2><p>There are four major blood types: A, B, AB, and O. The geneswe inherit from our parents determine our blood type. Different blood types cannot be mixed together, or the blood cells could start to clump together. When people have operations and need blood transfusions, the doctors need to know ahead of time what their blood type is so they give them transfusions of the same blood type. </p> <table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>People with this blood type...</th><th>...can donate to people with these blood types:</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>A</td><td>A, AB</td></tr><tr><td>B</td><td>B, AB</td></tr><tr><td> AB </td><td> AB </td></tr><tr><td>O</td><td> A, B, AB, O</td></tr></tbody></table> <p>People with type A blood can donate to other people with type A, or people with type AB. People with type B can donate to other people with type B, or people with type AB. AB blood can only be donated to someone else with AB blood. </p><p>O is known as the universal donor, since people with any type of blood can safely be given O as part of a transfusion. People with AB blood are considered to be the universal recipients (receivers), since they can safely receive any type of blood. </p><p>People's blood may also contain a protein called the Rhesus antigen, which appears to help energize the bodys cells. If you have the Rhesus antigen, you are Rh positive, or Rh+. If you don't have it, you are Rh negative, or Rh-. Whether you have this antigen is indicated with your blood type. For example, if you have type A blood and are Rh positive, your blood type would be indicated as A positive, or A+. When children or adults need blood transfusions, they must receive blood that is Rhesus compatible. </p>Blood

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