AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Tricuspid atresiaTTricuspid atresiaTricuspid atresiaEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC10.000000000000052.0000000000000297.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about tricuspid atresia, a condition involving blood passing through a hole in the atrial septum and mixing with blood coming back from the lungs.</p><p>With this serious but rare condition, the tricuspid valve has failed to develop, so blood cannot flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle. The right ventricle also does not form fully and is too small. As a result of the defect, blood passes through a hole in the atrial septum from the right atrium to the left, and mixes with blood coming back from the lungs. </p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>Tricuspid atresia is rare and sometimes associated with other cardiac abnormalities.</li> <li> Children with tricuspid atresia are usually cyanotic at birth or shortly after, and have congestive heart failure.</li> <li>Several surgeries are usually required early in life and allow for high survival rates.</li></ul>
Atrésie tricuspideAAtrésie tricuspideTricuspid AtresiaFrenchCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC10.000000000000052.0000000000000297.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Informez-vous sur l’atrésie tricuspide, un trouble où le sang passe par un trou dans le septum auriculaire et se mélange au sang qui revient des poumons.</p><p>Avec cette maladie grave, mais rare, la valvule tricuspide ne s'est pas développée, alors le sang ne peut circuler de l'oreillette droite au ventricule gauche. Le ventricule droit ne se forme pas non plus complètement, et il est trop petit. En raison de l’anomalie, le sang passe par un trou dans le septum auriculaire de l’oreillette droite à la gauche, et se mélange au sang qui revient des poumons. </p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li>L’atrésie tricuspide est rare mais elle est parfois associée à d’autres anomalies cardiaques. </li> <li> Les enfants atteints d’une atrésie tricuspide sont habituellement cyanotiques à la naissance ou peu après, et ils ont une insuffisance cardiaque congestive.</li> <li>Plusieurs chirurgies sont habituellement nécessaires au début de la vie et permettent un taux de survie élevé. </li></ul>

 

 

Tricuspid atresia1623.00000000000Tricuspid atresiaTricuspid atresiaTEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00ZFraser Golding, MD, FRCPC10.000000000000052.0000000000000297.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about tricuspid atresia, a condition involving blood passing through a hole in the atrial septum and mixing with blood coming back from the lungs.</p><p>With this serious but rare condition, the tricuspid valve has failed to develop, so blood cannot flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle. The right ventricle also does not form fully and is too small. As a result of the defect, blood passes through a hole in the atrial septum from the right atrium to the left, and mixes with blood coming back from the lungs. </p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>Tricuspid atresia is rare and sometimes associated with other cardiac abnormalities.</li> <li> Children with tricuspid atresia are usually cyanotic at birth or shortly after, and have congestive heart failure.</li> <li>Several surgeries are usually required early in life and allow for high survival rates.</li></ul><p>Tricuspid atresia is rare, making up only about 3% of heart defects. In about 20% of cases it is associated with other cardiac abnormalities. </p> <figure class="swf-asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Tricuspid atresia</span><div class="asset-animation"> src="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/akh/swfanimations/swf.html?swffile=Tricuspid_atresia_MED_ANI_EN.swf" </div> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">With this condition, no blood can flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle, because the tricuspid valve has failed to develop. An atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect (VSD) are usually present, and the VSD enables blood to reach the pulmonary artery and lungs.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>What are the symptoms of tricuspid atresia?</h2><p>Children with tricuspid atresia are usually cyanotic at birth or shortly after, and have congestive heart failure. </p><p>The diagnosis will be made by way of a chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, or echocardiogram. </p><h2>How is tricuspid atresia treated?</h2><p>Surgery is usually needed early in life. A shunt is placed between the aorta and pulmonary artery to provide blood flow to the lungs. Months later, a Glenn procedure is done to attach the superior vena cava to the pulmonary arteries to provide more blood flow to the lungs, and the shunt is removed. When the child is about two or three, a Fontan procedure is done. </p><h2>What is the long-term outlook for children with tricuspid atresia?</h2><p>For children with this condition, outcomes are quite good through the staged repair, with survival at 75% to 95%. In some cases, arrhythmias can develop later in life, as can lung problems. </p>Tricuspid atresia

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.