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肥厚型心肌病肥厚型心肌病Hypertrophic cardiomyopathyChineseSimplifiedCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2010-01-15T05:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>了解肥厚性心肌病,一种心脏肌肉异常肥厚的情况。这可能会影响心脏向身体泵出血液的数量,和导致心律的问题。</p>
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathyHHypertrophic cardiomyopathyHypertrophic cardiomyopathyEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2018-10-26T04:00:00Z11.300000000000044.0000000000000610.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a condition in which the heart muscle is unusually thick. This can affect the amount of blood pumped to the body and cause heart rhythm problems.</p><figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Normal left heart function</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Normal_Cardiomyopathy_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">1) Oxygenated blood is pumped into the left atrium from the lungs. The atrium contracts (pumps), pushing blood into the left ventricle. 2) The ventricles contract. 3) This contraction pumps the oxygenated blood out of the left ventricle and into the aorta. The aorta delivers oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. Deoxygenated blood is pumped into the pulmonary artery, to be taken to the lungs.</figcaption> </figure> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hypertrophic_Cardiomyopathy_Hypertrophic_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">1) In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the muscle in the heart is unusually thick. This can reduce the size of the left ventricle or make the walls of the ventricle stiffer. 2) The left ventricle is unable to fill with as much blood as it normally would. 3) The thick heart muscle can block the blood from leaving the heart. 4) This may result in higher pressure in the left atrium and less blood flow to the rest of the body.</figcaption> </figure> <p>For patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the muscle in the heart, usually in <a href="/Article?contentid=1577&language=English">the ventricles</a>, is unusually thick. This is known as hypertrophy. The thicker muscle can reduce the size of the left ventricle or make the walls of the ventricle stiffer, which affects the ability of the heart to fill and pump blood effectively to the body and/or the lungs. The altered arrangement of muscle fibres from the thickened muscle can cause abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), which are potentially fatal. HCM can develop at any age.</p><p>HCM is less common in babies and children and more often diagnosed during adolescence. It occurs in 1 in every 500 people.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the muscle in the heart is unusually thick, affecting its ability to pump blood to the body.</li><li>This condition is usually genetic and passed through families.</li><li>Doctors may recommend an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to treat this condition when the heart thickness reaches a certain size.<br></li></ul><h2>Symptoms of HCM in children</h2><p>Symptoms of HCM include: </p><ul><li>shortness of breath</li><li>chest pain</li><li>dizziness</li><li>fainting </li><li>palpitation</li><li>cardiac arrest (only in some cases). </li></ul><p>Some people with HCM may not experience any symptoms for a long time.</p><h2>What causes HCM in babies and children?</h2><p>HCM can occur spontaneously; however in most cases, the cause is genetic, meaning it is passed along through families. For this reason, it is usually recommended that anyone who is a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or child) of someone with HCM have a cardiac evaluation, even if they do not have any health concerns or heart-related symptoms.</p><h2>Treatment of HCM</h2><p>Implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICD) are recommended when the heart thickness reaches a certain size, even if your child does not have abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias). ICDs may reduce the risk of significant arrhythmias in certain types of HCM patients.</p><p>Many children will be on beta blocker medicine, a type of medicine that is used to slow the heart rate and ease the workload of the heart. On rare occasions, this condition may require a heart transplant.</p><h2>Complications of HCM in children</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Scar tissue in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hypertrophic_Cardiomyopathy_Scar_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">In some cases, fibrous (scar) tissue can replace the healthy heart muscle. This can result in abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias).</figcaption> </figure> <p>HCM has been associated with sudden cardiac events in children and adolescents, often due to either the blockage of blood getting out of the heart or an <a href="/Article?contentid=890&language=English">abnormally fast heart rhythm (arrhythmia)</a>. HCM is one of the most common causes of sudden death in young athletes.</p><p>Arrhythmias have been seen in up to 30-40% of patients with HCM. Ongoing research shows this may be related to the healthy, normal heart muscle (myocardium) being replaced by abnormal or scar tissue called myocardial fibrosis.</p><p>Infants with HCM may also have an underlying metabolic condition that may involve muscle groups or organs other than the heart.</p>
Cardiomyopathie hypertrophiqueCCardiomyopathie hypertrophiqueHypertrophic CardiomyopathyFrenchCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2010-01-15T05:00:00Z11.000000000000038.0000000000000222.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Informez-vous sur la myocardiopathie hypertrophique, un épaississement exceptionnel du muscle cardiaque qui peut affecter la quantité de sang pompé vers le cœur et causer de l’arythmie.</p><p>Cette page explique en quoi la myocardiopathie hypertrophique influence la capacité du cœur à pomper, à se décontracter normalement, et à faire circuler le sang dans le corps. </p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li> En présence de myocardiopathie hypertrophique, le muscle cardiaque est exceptionnellement épais et le cœur a donc du mal à pomper du sang vers le corps. </li> <li>La cardiomyopathie hypertrophique est normalement héréditaire. </li> <li> Les médecins recommandent de recourir à un défibrillateur cardiaque implantable (DCI) lorsque l’épaisseur du cœur atteint une taille déterminée. </li></ul>

 

 

Heart conditions: AcquiredHeart conditions: AcquiredHeart conditions: AcquiredHEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-03-26T04:00:00ZLanding PageCollection Hub<p>Many heart conditions develop over time, usually later in life. However, some conditions can develop during childhood. Some of these are temporary while others last for a long period of time or even a lifetime.</p><p>Many heart conditions develop over time, usually later in life. However, some conditions can develop during childhood. Some of these are temporary, such as those caused by infection, while others last for a long period of time or even a lifetime.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">The heart and the circulatory system</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The heart is a vital organ that sits between the lungs in your chest. It pumps blood around the body through a network a blood vessels (arteries and veins). Learn about the heart’s anatomy, its role in the body and how it works.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1577&language=English">The normal heart</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1579&language=English">The circulatory system before and after birth</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1578&language=English">Blood</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Cardiomyopathy</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>With cardiomyopathy the muscle of the heart is affected and is no longer able to pump effectively. Find information on the different types of cardiomyopathy and how it is treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1628&language=English">Dilated cardiomyopathy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1629&language=English">Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1630&language=English">Restrictive cardiomyopathy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1631&language=English">Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Infective endocarditis</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Infective endocarditis occurs when germs get into the blood and lodge inside the heart. Learn how this condition is diagnosed and how it is treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=895&language=English">Infective endocarditis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1632&language=English">Diagnosis of infective endocarditis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1697&language=English">Preventing infective endocarditis</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Pulmonary hypertension</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Pulmonary hypertension occurs when there is high pressure in the artery carrying blood from the heart to the lungs. Learn about the symptoms, causes, diagnosis and treatment of this condition. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=893&language=English">Pulmonary hypertension</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Tests and diagnosis</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1274&language=English">Echocardiogram</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1642&language=English">Echocardiogram (heart ultrasound)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1647&language=English">Imaging tests: X-ray, MRI and CT scan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1276&language=English">Electrocardiogram (ECG) test</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1645&language=English">Heart catheterization test</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1666&language=English">Heart catheterization</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Other heart diseases and conditions</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn about other types of acquired heart conditions such as congestive heart failure, hyperlipidemia, heart tumours and sudden cardiac death. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1586&language=English">Congestive heart failure</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1580&language=English">Genetics and heart conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=891&language=English">High cholesterol (hyperlipidemia)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=892&language=English">Heart tumours</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1587&language=English">Other symptoms of a heart condition</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1588&language=English">Sudden cardiac death</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">The health-care team</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Read about the different health-care professionals and teams that will be involved with your child's care.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1591&language=English">Cardiology treatment team</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1597&language=English">Family support for the child with a congenital heart condition</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1594&language=English">Genetics team</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1595&language=English">Nursing team</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1598&language=English">Nutrition and feeding consultants for patients with congenital heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1169&language=English">Pharmacists</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1599&language=English">Respiratory therapists: Helping children with congenital heart conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1593&language=English">Rehabilitation therapists for children with heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1592&language=English">Surgical teams for children with heart conditions</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/heart_learning_hub.pngheartconditions

 

 

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy1629.00000000000Hypertrophic cardiomyopathyHypertrophic cardiomyopathyHEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2018-10-26T04:00:00Z11.300000000000044.0000000000000610.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a condition in which the heart muscle is unusually thick. This can affect the amount of blood pumped to the body and cause heart rhythm problems.</p><figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Normal left heart function</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Normal_Cardiomyopathy_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">1) Oxygenated blood is pumped into the left atrium from the lungs. The atrium contracts (pumps), pushing blood into the left ventricle. 2) The ventricles contract. 3) This contraction pumps the oxygenated blood out of the left ventricle and into the aorta. The aorta delivers oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. Deoxygenated blood is pumped into the pulmonary artery, to be taken to the lungs.</figcaption> </figure> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hypertrophic_Cardiomyopathy_Hypertrophic_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">1) In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the muscle in the heart is unusually thick. This can reduce the size of the left ventricle or make the walls of the ventricle stiffer. 2) The left ventricle is unable to fill with as much blood as it normally would. 3) The thick heart muscle can block the blood from leaving the heart. 4) This may result in higher pressure in the left atrium and less blood flow to the rest of the body.</figcaption> </figure> <p>For patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the muscle in the heart, usually in <a href="/Article?contentid=1577&language=English">the ventricles</a>, is unusually thick. This is known as hypertrophy. The thicker muscle can reduce the size of the left ventricle or make the walls of the ventricle stiffer, which affects the ability of the heart to fill and pump blood effectively to the body and/or the lungs. The altered arrangement of muscle fibres from the thickened muscle can cause abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), which are potentially fatal. HCM can develop at any age.</p><p>HCM is less common in babies and children and more often diagnosed during adolescence. It occurs in 1 in every 500 people.</p><h2>What is cardiomyopathy</h2><p>Cardiomyopathy is a disorder affecting the heart muscle. The heart may have a normal structure but there are problems in the way it develops or functions. Cardiomyopathy usually results in the heart being unable to pump properly, also known as <a href="/Article?contentid=1586&language=English">heart failure</a>. </p><p>Cardiomyopathy can be caused by a number of factors, including infections, conditions affecting the body’s metabolism and genetics. </p><p>There are several different types of cardiomyopathy. The four main types of cardiomyopathy are: </p><ul><li>hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1628&language=English">dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1630&language=English">restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1631&language=English">arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)</a></li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the muscle in the heart is unusually thick, affecting its ability to pump blood to the body.</li><li>This condition is usually genetic and passed through families.</li><li>Doctors may recommend an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to treat this condition when the heart thickness reaches a certain size.<br></li></ul><h2>Symptoms of HCM in children</h2><p>Symptoms of HCM include: </p><ul><li>shortness of breath</li><li>chest pain</li><li>dizziness</li><li>fainting </li><li>palpitation</li><li>cardiac arrest (only in some cases). </li></ul><p>Some people with HCM may not experience any symptoms for a long time.</p><h2>What causes HCM in babies and children?</h2><p>HCM can occur spontaneously; however in most cases, the cause is genetic, meaning it is passed along through families. For this reason, it is usually recommended that anyone who is a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or child) of someone with HCM have a cardiac evaluation, even if they do not have any health concerns or heart-related symptoms.</p><h2>Treatment of HCM</h2><p>Implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICD) are recommended when the heart thickness reaches a certain size, even if your child does not have abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias). ICDs may reduce the risk of significant arrhythmias in certain types of HCM patients.</p><p>Many children will be on beta blocker medicine, a type of medicine that is used to slow the heart rate and ease the workload of the heart. On rare occasions, this condition may require a heart transplant.</p><h2>Complications of HCM in children</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Scar tissue in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hypertrophic_Cardiomyopathy_Scar_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">In some cases, fibrous (scar) tissue can replace the healthy heart muscle. This can result in abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias).</figcaption> </figure> <p>HCM has been associated with sudden cardiac events in children and adolescents, often due to either the blockage of blood getting out of the heart or an <a href="/Article?contentid=890&language=English">abnormally fast heart rhythm (arrhythmia)</a>. HCM is one of the most common causes of sudden death in young athletes.</p><p>Arrhythmias have been seen in up to 30-40% of patients with HCM. Ongoing research shows this may be related to the healthy, normal heart muscle (myocardium) being replaced by abnormal or scar tissue called myocardial fibrosis.</p><p>Infants with HCM may also have an underlying metabolic condition that may involve muscle groups or organs other than the heart.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hypertrophic_Cardiomyopathy_Hypertrophic_EN.jpgHypertrophic cardiomyopathyFalse

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