GrievingGGrievingGrievingEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemNAAdult (19+)NA2010-05-19T04:00:00ZLaura Beaune, RNChristine Newman, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000070.0000000000000849.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-ZLosing a child is one of the most difficult losses to deal with. This page describes common reactions to grief and suggests some ways to cope.<p>You may be overwhelmed with a range of emotions after the loss of your child. Losing a child is one of the most difficult losses to deal with. No parent expects to outlive their child. You may feel sad one minute and angry the next. You may feel shock, denial, and depression. Sometimes you feel these emotions all together or one after the other. Often they come without warning. You may also experience a tremendous emotional release if you've been holding your emotions in throughout the course of your child's illness. </p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> It is normal to feel overwhelmed with different emotions after losing a child.</li> <li> It is healthy to express your emotions and ask for help after the death of a child.</li></ul>
Le deuilLLe deuilGrievingFrenchCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemNAAdult (19+)NA2010-05-19T04:00:00ZLaura Beaune, RNChristine Newman, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000070.0000000000000849.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-ZLa perte d’un enfant est l’un des deuils les plus difficiles à vivre. Cette page décrit les réactions courantes face au deuil et suggère plusieurs manières d’y faire face.<p> Cette page explique les réactions courantes durant le processus de deuil et présente différentes stratégies permettant de surmonter le deuil. </p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li>Il est normal de se sentir accablé par différentes émotions après la perte d’un enfant.</li> <li>Il est sain d’exprimer vos émotions et de demander de l’aide après le décès d’un enfant.</li></ul>

 

 

Grieving1691.00000000000GrievingGrievingGEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)HeartCardiovascular systemNAAdult (19+)NA2010-05-19T04:00:00ZLaura Beaune, RNChristine Newman, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000070.0000000000000849.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-ZLosing a child is one of the most difficult losses to deal with. This page describes common reactions to grief and suggests some ways to cope.<p>You may be overwhelmed with a range of emotions after the loss of your child. Losing a child is one of the most difficult losses to deal with. No parent expects to outlive their child. You may feel sad one minute and angry the next. You may feel shock, denial, and depression. Sometimes you feel these emotions all together or one after the other. Often they come without warning. You may also experience a tremendous emotional release if you've been holding your emotions in throughout the course of your child's illness. </p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> It is normal to feel overwhelmed with different emotions after losing a child.</li> <li> It is healthy to express your emotions and ask for help after the death of a child.</li></ul><h2>What feelings will you experience when your child dies?</h2> <p>Grieving tends to follow a certain process, though every individual grieves differently. Well known grief counsellor William Worden identified four phases of grief as follows: </p><ul><li>acceptance of the reality of the loss</li><li>experience of the pain of grief</li><li>adjustment to an environment in which the deceased is missing</li><li>withdrawal of emotional energy from the deceased and reinvestment in another relationship</li></ul><p>Individuals may go through these phases in steps or move back and forth between phases.</p><h2>What are normal grief reactions?</h2><ul><li>crying unexpectedly</li><li>forgetfulness</li><li>tightening of the throat and chest</li><li>sighing<br></li><li>confusion, inability to perform simple tasks</li><li>fatigue, restlessness</li><li>change in sleeping habits</li><li>apathy</li><li>loss of appetite or overeating</li><li>feeling of emptiness</li><li>sense of the presence of the deceased</li><li>frequent dreams about the deceased</li></ul><h2>How do you cope with your feelings?</h2><p>Give yourself time to adjust. These are immensely uncomfortable feelings. Initially you may just want to withdraw. Be gentle with yourself, but in time try to see the good things in life and reconnect with loved ones. Don't be afraid to let people know you need help. Be specific when telling them how they can help by doing things such as spending time with you, doing some shopping, or helping out with baby care. </p><p>Talk about your feelings with someone close to you, someone who can listen patiently and without judging. Consider, though, that your spouse will be struggling with emotional overload too, and neither of you may be in a position to effectively comfort each other. The same may hold true for other family members and friends. </p><p>Catch up on relationships with friends when you're ready. It might be helpful to try to make some new relationships. Reading books and poetry can provide some comfort, as can writing, perhaps in a journal or in letters to your child. </p><p>Consider joining a bereavement support group or speaking to a grief counsellor. It is likely that someone from the cardiac team or from the hospital palliative care service will also follow up with you periodically after the event. They can provide support and suggest resources. </p><p>If you are a spiritual person, your faith may provide some comfort, in the form of religious services and prayer. If you find yourself angry at God, know that this is a common reaction. Rituals like a funeral can also provide an opportunity to honour your child. </p><p>Don't think you need to be stoic and emotionless. It's healthy to express your feelings; show your other children that it’s acceptable. Say something like: "Today I'm feeling sad. How about you?" </p><p>Grieving is a truly personal experience. Everyone grieves in their own way. There is no set time for getting over something. Know that it will be a struggle and very painful in the beginning. The intensity of your grief will change; however, it doesn't necessarily get easier in time. You won't "get over it," but you will find a way to reconcile yourself to what has happened. Denying the loss and your pain may prevent you from moving on and learning to live without your child. You won't forget your child, but you will simply find a new way of living that enables you to embrace new experiences. </p><p>Sometimes the death of someone close prompts people to take up new causes to help others, to engage in new activities, or to meet new people. It can also prompt a bigger embracing of life and how precious it is. The bottom line is that over time, those who are grieving the loss of someone close come to accept what has happened and learn to grow again. </p><h2>Advice for parents coping with grief:</h2><ul><li>Take care of yourselves physically.</li><li>Work on your own grief too.</li><li>Deal with your feelings of guilt and blame.</li><li>Allow surviving children their own method of grieving.</li><li>Get help for surviving children, if they need it.</li><li>Find healthy ways to remember your child.</li><li>Find ways to spend time with your surviving children but at the same time give them space when needed.</li><li>Don't compare your dead child to your surviving children or expect them to fill the void in your life created by your child's death. </li></ul><h2>What if your grief is overwhelming you?</h2><p>If you find yourself sinking into a depression or unable to cope — particularly if you withdraw from your family and can't parent your surviving children — seek out the help of a counsellor or bereavement group. Major red flags include concerns about your own well being, concerns expressed by others about your well being, and thoughts of self-harm. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/grieving.jpgGrieving

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