Insulin in diabetes managementIInsulin in diabetes managementInsulin in diabetes managementEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Insulin allows sugar to be stored as energy. Learn what role insulin plays in diabetes management.</p><p>Our bodies require insulin to allow cells to have energy and to allow extra sugar to be stored as energy. This section will cover the important role insulin plays in diabetes management.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that allows cells to use sugar for energy and allows the extra sugar to be stored as energy for future use.</li> <li>Without enough insulin, sugar cannot be taken up and used by most of the body cells.</li> <li>Patients with diabetes must administer their own insulin.</li><ul></ul></ul>
L'insuline et la gestion du diabèteLL'insuline et la gestion du diabèteInsulin in diabetes managementFrenchEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>L’insuline transforme le sucre en énergie que vous pouvez stocker dans votre corps. Découvrez son rôle dans la prise en charge du diabète.</p><p>L’insuline permet aux cellules de notre corps d’absorber l’énergie et stocke le sucre excédentaire sous forme d’énergie. Cette section porte sur le rôle important qu’elle joue dans la prise en charge du diabète.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>L’insuline est une hormone produite par les cellules bêta du pancréas. Elle permet aux cellules de notre corps de consommer l’énergie absorbée par l’organisme et stocke le sucre excédentaire sous forme de réserves énergétiques.</li> <li>En cas de carence en insuline, la plupart des cellules ne peuvent pas absorber et utiliser le sucre.</li> <li>Les diabétiques doivent s’administrer de l’insuline.<br></li><ul></ul></ul>

 

 

Insulin in diabetes management1728.00000000000Insulin in diabetes managementInsulin in diabetes managementIEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Insulin allows sugar to be stored as energy. Learn what role insulin plays in diabetes management.</p><p>Our bodies require insulin to allow cells to have energy and to allow extra sugar to be stored as energy. This section will cover the important role insulin plays in diabetes management.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that allows cells to use sugar for energy and allows the extra sugar to be stored as energy for future use.</li> <li>Without enough insulin, sugar cannot be taken up and used by most of the body cells.</li> <li>Patients with diabetes must administer their own insulin.</li><ul></ul></ul><h2>What is insulin?</h2><p>Insulin is a hormone, which is a type of chemical messenger that allows communication between different parts of the body. Insulin is produced by the <a href="/Article?contentid=1717&language=English">beta cells</a> of the pancreas.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">What does insulin normally do?</span> <div class="asset-animation"> src="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/akh/swfanimations/AMD_insulin_normal_EN.html" </div> </figure> <p>When we eat, food goes into the <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1467&language=English">stomach</a> and then to the small intestine. There, it is digested and broken down into nutrients. These nutrients are small enough to be absorbed into the bloodstream and carried to all parts of the body. When nutrients that contain glucose (sugar) enter the bloodstream, the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood.</p><p>Insulin does the following:</p><ul><li>It opens up the cell channels so that they can take up sugar and have the energy to do their work.</li><li>It allows extra sugar to be stored as energy for future use. The sugar can be stored in the liver as glycogen, or transformed in fat and stored in fat cells.</li></ul><h2>What is insulin’s function?</h2><p>Sugar is a very important source of energy, for two reasons:</p><ul><li>It can be converted quickly into energy when we need it, such as during work or sports.</li><li>The brain and nerves rely on a constant supply of sugar to function.</li></ul><p>Our bodies are almost always making a small amount of insulin, called the basal amount. We need this because the liver continues to release some of its stored sugar into the blood between meals and while we sleep. This way, our brain and nerves continue to get the constant supply of sugar needed to survive.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">What happens in type 1 and type 2 diabetes</span> <div class="asset-animation"> src="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/akh/swfanimations/AMD_insulin_type1_type2_diabetes_EN.html" </div> </figure> <p>As soon as the blood sugar rises (for example, after a meal), the beta cells of the pancreas detect the higher blood sugar levels via sensors on their surface, and tell the beta cells that more insulin is needed. This lets the beta cells give out just the right amount of insulin to handle the higher blood sugar level. This burst of insulin to cover the meal is called a bolus.</p><p>When the blood sugar level comes down again, the burst of extra insulin shuts off. The beta cells keep extra insulin on hand as usual. As the insulin is used up, the beta cells produce more. The next time your child eats, the pancreas responds with just the right amount of insulin to bring the blood sugar level back into the normal range.</p><p>This system works well in people without diabetes, as blood sugar levels stay within the normal range even if they eat a lot or go without food for a long time. If a person does not eat at all, the extra insulin just does not get released.</p><h2>What happens in case of diabetes?</h2><p>Without enough insulin, sugar cannot be taken up and used by most of the body cells. The cells starve, even though the blood sugar concentration may be very high. As a result, the body seeks other sources of energy. This leads eventually to the breakdown of fat and the release of <a href="/Article?contentid=1727&language=English">ketones</a>, which are the by-products of fat breakdown.</p><p>Patients with diabetes must administer insulin from an outside source, through <a href="/Article?contentid=1731&language=English">injections</a> or with the use of <a href="/Article?contentid=1733&language=English">insulin pumps</a>, or with <a href="/Article?contentid=1722&language=English">oral medications</a> to stimulate natural insulin production and uptake.</p>Insulin in diabetes management

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