Buying and storing insulinBBuying and storing insulinBuying and storing insulinEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out how insulin should be stored, how long it will last and when it is unsafe to use.</p><p>If your child requires insulin you will need purchase it at a pharmacy. It is important to know how to properly store insulin and when it is unsafe to use.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Insulin is sold in any pharmacy and some types may be available without a prescription. </li><li>Opened bottles of insulin can be stored in the refrigerator or at room temperature for one month.</li><li>Do not use rapid- or long-acting insulin if it is cloudy or has particles floating in it.</li><li>Do not use intermediate-acting insulin if particles or lumps are floating around after mixing or solid pieces stick to the bottle.</li></ul>
Achat et conservation de l’insulineAAchat et conservation de l’insulineBuying and storing insulinFrenchEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Familiarisez-vous avec le stockage et la durée de l’insuline, et sachez dans quels cas il est dangereux de l’employer.<br></p><p>Si votre enfant a besoin d’insuline, vous devrez l’acheter à la pharmacie. Il faut savoir comment la stocker et quand il devient dangereux de l’utiliser.<br></p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>L’insuline se vend dans toutes les pharmacies et certains types sont même offerts sans ordonnance.</li> <li>Vous pouvez garder un mois au réfrigérateur ou à la température de la pièce les flacons d’insuline déjà ouverts.</li> <li>Jetez l’insuline à action rapide ou prolongée si elle est trouble ou si vous y voyez flotter des particules.</li> <li>Jetez l’insuline à action intermédiaire si des particules ou des grumeaux flottent après l’avoir mélangée ou si des morceaux solides collent au flacon.</li></ul>

 

 

Buying and storing insulin1730.00000000000Buying and storing insulinBuying and storing insulinBEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out how insulin should be stored, how long it will last and when it is unsafe to use.</p><p>If your child requires insulin you will need purchase it at a pharmacy. It is important to know how to properly store insulin and when it is unsafe to use.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Insulin is sold in any pharmacy and some types may be available without a prescription. </li><li>Opened bottles of insulin can be stored in the refrigerator or at room temperature for one month.</li><li>Do not use rapid- or long-acting insulin if it is cloudy or has particles floating in it.</li><li>Do not use intermediate-acting insulin if particles or lumps are floating around after mixing or solid pieces stick to the bottle.</li></ul><h2>Where is insulin sold?<br></h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=1728&language=English">Insulin</a> is sold in any pharmacy. In most places some types of insulin are available without a prescription. Each vial or cartridge has an expiry date (usually one to two years after the purchase date). You should throw out the insulin after it has expired.</p><p>Insulin costs vary depending on type. The cost of insulin is covered by some provincial government healthcare plans in Canada. Most insurance companies need a prescription to refund the cost.</p><h2>How should insulin be stored?</h2><p>Insulin can be kept safely in the refrigerator (2 to 8 degrees Celsius) until its expiry date. After it has been opened, it can be stored in the refrigerator or at room temperature for a month. When starting a new bottle, write the date on it so you can tell how long it has been since you opened the bottle.</p><p>Insulin is a very stable substance that does not “go bad” easily. However, insulin can be damaged if it freezes or gets extremely hot. When in doubt, throw out the insulin and use a new vial or cartridge.</p><p>As a general rule, you should avoid shaking the bottle up and down or the insulin will become frothy and hard to measure accurately.</p><h2>When not to use insulin</h2><h3>When not to use rapid- or long-acting insulin</h3><p>Do <strong>not</strong> use “clear” insulin (<a href="/Article?contentid=1729&language=English">rapid- and long-acting insulins</a>) such as Glulisine (Apidra), Lispro (Humalog), Aspart (NovoRapid), Determir (Levemir) or Glargine (Lantus) if:</p><ul><li>it becomes “cloudy” or straw-coloured</li><li>it has solid particles floating in it.</li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-100"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_insulin_clear_problem_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <h3>When not to use intermediate-acting insulin</h3><p>It is natural for the white substance in cloudy (<a href="/Article?contentid=1729&language=English">intermediate-acting </a>) insulin to settle to the bottom of the bottle over a period of time. This should mix easily into the solution.</p><p>Do <strong>not</strong> use “cloudy” intermediate-acting insulin (such as Humulin-N or Novolin-NPH) if:</p><ul><li>particles or lumps are floating around after mixing</li><li>solid pieces stick to the bottom or sides of the bottle.</li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-100"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_insulin_cloudy_problem_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>To be safe, if the insulin is exposed to freezing or very hot temperatures, throw out the bottle.</p><p>If a child is hiking, camping, or travelling long distances, protect bottles from breaking and protect insulin from temperature extremes by wrapping bottles individually. Then place them in a small thermal container to avoid extreme temperature variations. Always keep a spare bottle of insulin on hand in case one gets broken. For children using two kinds of insulin, keep a spare bottle of each type.</p> ​​https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_insulin_clear_problem_EN.jpgBuying and storing insulinFalse

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