Other devices for insulin injectionsOOther devices for insulin injectionsOther devices for insulin injectionsEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Several other devices can be used to make insulin injections easier. Learn what these devices are and whether they are right for your child.</p><p>There are many devices that try to help make injections easier. However, none takes away the need for an injection itself. Before you spend any money on any injection aid, talk to your diabetes team.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>No injection aid device will eliminate the need for an injection itself.</li> <li>If your child is bothered by manually inserting a needle, a spring-loaded device can be useful.</li> <li>Insuflon and i-Port are a more pain-free method of injecting insulin.</li></ul>
Autres instruments d’injection d’insulineAAutres instruments d’injection d’insulineOther devices for insulin injectionsFrenchEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Il existe plusieurs autres dispositifs qui facilitent l’injection d’insuline. Découvrez-les et voyez lesquels conviennent à votre enfant.</p><p>Il y a de nombreux instruments qui tentent de rendre les injections plus faciles. Cependant, aucun n’élimine le besoin d’une injection proprement dite. Avant de dépenser votre argent sur des aides à l’injection, parlez à l’équipe de soins de santé du diabète.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Rien n’élimine le besoin de faire une piqûre.</li> <li>Si votre enfant n’aime pas faire insérer l’aiguille manuellement, un instrument équipé d’un ressort pourrait vous être utile.</li> <li>L’insuflon et le système i-Port sont des méthodes moins douloureuses d’injecter de l’insuline.</li></ul>

 

 

Other devices for insulin injections1734.00000000000Other devices for insulin injectionsOther devices for insulin injectionsOEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais, RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington​, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Several other devices can be used to make insulin injections easier. Learn what these devices are and whether they are right for your child.</p><p>There are many devices that try to help make injections easier. However, none takes away the need for an injection itself. Before you spend any money on any injection aid, talk to your diabetes team.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>No injection aid device will eliminate the need for an injection itself.</li> <li>If your child is bothered by manually inserting a needle, a spring-loaded device can be useful.</li> <li>Insuflon and i-Port are a more pain-free method of injecting insulin.</li></ul><h2>No device eliminates the need for a needle</h2><p>If your child wants an injection aid to reduce pain, remind them that all injections hurt a little. If the injection is more painful than usual, try to:</p><ul><li>check the needle; there may be a defect</li><li>insert the needle quickly; inserting the needle slowly hurts more</li><li>push the plunger in a little more slowly—this will reduce any burning sensation</li><li>take the insulin out of the refrigerator some time before the injection to let the insulin warm up—children say they can feel cold insulin being injected</li><li>pinch the skin less tightly</li><li>try a different injection site.</li></ul><p>If none of this works, talk to your diabetes nurse about the selection of <a href="/Article?contentid=1735&language=English">injection sites </a> , different kinds of needles and other tools that may be helpful.</p><h2>Insertion aids</h2><p>If your child is bothered by manually inserting a needle, a spring-loaded device can be useful. With the push of a button, the needle of an insulin-filled syringe is quickly inserted in under the skin. Then simply push the plunger of the syringe to inject the insulin.</p><h2>Insuflon and i-Port</h2><h3>Insuflon</h3><p>An insuflon is a small catheter that is inserted through the skin into the fat that stays in place for up to four days. It is held in place by an adhesive sticker. The insuflon requires a needle for catheter insertion. Insulin is injected via a syringe through the silicone membrane on the insuflon and reaches the fat layer without the needle having to pierce the skin. Therefore, insuflon is a more pain-free alternative to daily injections through the skin.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">How an insuflon works</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_insuflon_function_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption>An insuflon offers a more pain-free alternative to daily injections through the skin.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>I-Port</h3><p>An i-Port, like an insuflon, places a cannula under the skin through one needle. An i-Port uses an “inserter” that places the thin cannula in the skin. The insulin can then be injected through the cannula with a regular syringe and a needle that never pokes the skin.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_insuflon_function_EN.jpgOther devices for insulin injections

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