Informed consentIInformed consentInformed consentEnglishNeonatologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC11.000000000000046.0000000000000564.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about informed choice, which is the option a person has to allow or not allow a procedure to happen once the procedure has been completely explained.</p><p>Informed choice is the option a person has to allow or not allow a procedure to happen once the procedure has been completely explained. In most cases except in emergencies, informed choice and informed consent will be obtained from parents or caregivers before treatment begins.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Informed choice is the option a person has to allow or not allow a test or procedure to happen after they have been informed of the benefits and risks of the options involved.</li> <li>Informed consent is when a person voluntarily agrees to a procedure after they know what the benefits and risks are.</li> <li>If treatment cannot wait for informed consent, the doctor can decide whether to go ahead without consent. This may vary depending on the hospital.</li></ul>
Consentement éclairéCConsentement éclairéInformed consentFrenchNeonatologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC11.000000000000046.0000000000000564.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Lisez au sujet du choix éclairé, qui est l’option qu’une personne a de permettre ou non qu’une procédure soit effectuée, une fois que la procédure a été complètement expliquée.</p><p>Le choix éclairé est une option qu’une personne a de permettre ou non qu’un test ou une procédure soit effectué, après qu’il a été informé des avantages et des risques qu’impliquent cette décision. En général, sauf lors de situations d’urgence, les parents ou les tuteurs donnent leur consentement avant que les traitements ne commencent. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Le choix éclairé est une option qu’a une personne de permettre ou non qu’un test ou une procédure soit effectué, après qu’il a été informé des avantages et des risques qu’impliquent cette décision.</li> <li>Le consentement éclairé survient lorsqu’une personne accepte volontairement un traitement après avoir bien compris les avantages et les risques associés.</li> <li>Si le traitement ne peut pas attendre, le médecin peut décider s’il doit procéder sans consentement. Ceci peut être différent d’un hôpital à l’autre. </li></ul>

 

 

Informed consent1832.00000000000Informed consentInformed consentIEnglishNeonatologyPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00ZJonathan Hellmann, MBBCh, MHSc, FCP(SA), FRCPC11.000000000000046.0000000000000564.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about informed choice, which is the option a person has to allow or not allow a procedure to happen once the procedure has been completely explained.</p><p>Informed choice is the option a person has to allow or not allow a procedure to happen once the procedure has been completely explained. In most cases except in emergencies, informed choice and informed consent will be obtained from parents or caregivers before treatment begins.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Informed choice is the option a person has to allow or not allow a test or procedure to happen after they have been informed of the benefits and risks of the options involved.</li> <li>Informed consent is when a person voluntarily agrees to a procedure after they know what the benefits and risks are.</li> <li>If treatment cannot wait for informed consent, the doctor can decide whether to go ahead without consent. This may vary depending on the hospital.</li></ul><h2>What is informed choice or informed consent?</h2><p>Informed choice is the option a person has to allow or not allow a test or procedure to happen after they have been informed of the benefits and risks of the options involved. If the person voluntarily agrees, they give informed consent. </p><p>Although the term “informed consent” is a legal one, it is generally a much more informal and personal process. The key is good communication with staff. In general, parents do not consent to each and every individual procedure or treatment for their premature baby. Rather, after discussions and consultations with medical staff, a course of action is explained and justified, and then agreed upon. </p><p>Ideally, these discussions happens pre-emptively, meaning they take place before treatment begins. However, this is not always possible, especially in emergency situations. The way in which this process takes place varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. </p><h2>Who gives informed consent?</h2><p>In some jurisdictions, children who are fully capable of understanding have the right to make decisions about their own treatment. Different jurisdictions may have different laws about the age at which children can make these decisions. As your child is a premature baby, you, as parent or guardian, give consent for your baby to undergo treatment or participate in a research study. Normally, this means signing a consent form. </p><p>When a parent or guardian is not available but can be contacted by telephone, a verbal consent is acceptable.</p><h2>What happens in the event of an emergency?</h2><p>In the case of an emergency, when treatment needs to go ahead and the person who should give consent cannot be contacted at all, every reasonable additional effort is made to contact the parent or guardian. If treatment cannot wait, the doctor can decide whether to go ahead without consent. This decision is recorded in the patient’s health record. </p><h2>What does informed consent to undergo treatment such as surgery involve?</h2><p>Consent before surgery or other treatment is an example of the informed consent process. Before your premature baby is scheduled for a procedure or surgery, you, as their parent or guardian, participate in a discussion to decide whether or not the doctor can go ahead. The doctor w​ill discuss with you the risks involved with the surgery, treatment, or procedure under anesthesia before you sign a consent form. they are required to tell you about any potential problems that could occur and to ensure that you understand the general nature of the procedure. </p><p>This discussion provides an opportunity to ask any questions you may have about the procedure or express any concerns you have. You also need to hear about the potential negative outcomes. This is usually very difficult to hear, but you should try to stop yourself from thinking the worst. </p><p>In the case of surgery and some other procedures, by signing the form you will also be consenting to the use of anesthesia if necessary. At some hospitals, you may be asked to give a separate consent for the use of anesthesia. Usually you are also agreeing to any additional investigation or treatment that the doctor may decide is immediately necessary during the surgery. This would only happen if the doctor finds something they were not expecting to find, and needs to do something about it right away. The consent forms will be kept in your baby’s medical record. </p>Informed consent

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