Recreational water illnesses: Prevention and precautionRRecreational water illnesses: Prevention and precautionRecreational water illnesses: Prevention and precautionEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyNAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Diarrhea;Fever;Vomiting2014-05-21T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, PEng10.000000000000054.0000000000000489.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to prevent the spread of recreational water illnesses while cooling down in pools, fountains and water parks.</p><p>Hot weather makes public pools, fountains, water parks and splash pads attractive options for some refreshing fun. But despite the sunny weather, laughter and playing, these public water areas are not all fun and games. With so many people using public water amenities, often without showering first, these areas can soon become sources of common recreational water illnesses.</p> <h2>What are recreational water illnesses?</h2><p>Recreational water illnesses are illnesses caused by bacteria or chemicals found in the water that your child swims or plays in. Bacteria can be spread by swallowing, breathing or having contact with contaminated water.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Recreational water illnesses are caused by swallowing or having contact with water that is contaminated with bacteria.</li> <li>Even if water is treated with chlorine, some bacteria take time to kill.</li> <li>Prevent the spread of recreational water illnesses by showering with soap before swimming, washing hands after using the toilet or changing diapers, and not letting a child with diarrhea go in the water.</li> <li>Remind your child not to drink or swallow the water they play in.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of recreational water illnesses</h2> <p> Recreational water illnesses can appear as many different infections, including skin, stomach, ear and eye infections. Common recreational water illness symptoms are <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> and abdominal (tummy) cramps.</p><h2>Sources</h2> <p>Recreational Water Illnesses. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/rwi.html.</p>
Maladies transmises par les eaux de baignade: prévention et précautionMMaladies transmises par les eaux de baignade: prévention et précautionRecreational water illnesses: Prevention and precautionFrenchNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyNAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Diarrhea;Fever;Vomiting2014-05-21T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, PEng10.000000000000054.0000000000000489.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez comment prévenir la propagation des maladies transmises par les eaux de baignade dans les piscines, les fontaines et dans les parcs aquatiques.</p><p>Par temps chaud, les piscines publiques, les fontaines, les parcs aquatiques et les terrains de jeux d'eau offrent l’attrait de s’amuser tout en se rafraîchissant. Toutefois, même si le soleil, les rires et les activités ludiques sont au rendez-vous, la fréquentation des lieux de baignade publics comporte un aspect moins réjouissant. Tellement de gens utilisent ces installations, souvent sans s’être douchés auparavant, qu’elles peuvent rapidement devenir des foyers de maladies couramment transmises par les eaux de baignade (MTEB).</p> <h2>En quoi consistent les maladies transmises par les eaux de baignade?</h2><p>Les MTEB sont des maladies causées par des bactéries ou des substances chimiques présentes dans les eaux où votre enfant se baigne ou joue. La transmission des bactéries peut se faire par voie d’ingestion ou d’inspiration ou par contact avec l’eau contaminée.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Les maladies liées aux eaux de baignade sont transmises par ingestion des eaux contaminées par des bactéries ou par contact avec elles.</li> <li>Même si les eaux sont traitées au chlore, certaines bactéries peuvent survivre un certain temps.</li> <li>Prévenez la propagation des MTEB en vous lavant avec du savon sous une douche avant de vous baigner, en vous lavant les mains après être allé à la toilette ou avoir changé des couches et en ne permettant pas à votre enfant d’aller à l’eau s’il a une diarrhée.</li> <li>Rappelez à votre enfant de ne pas boire ni avaler l’eau dans laquelle il joue.</li> </ul><h2>Signes et symptômes des maladies transmises par les eaux de baignade</h2> <p> Signes et symptômes des maladies transmises par les eaux de baignade <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">la fièvre</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=French">les vomissements</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=French">la diarrhée</a> et les crampes abdominales (ventre).</p><h2>Sources</h2> <p>Recreational Water Illnesses. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/rwi.html.</p>

 

 

Recreational water illnesses: Prevention and precaution1919.00000000000Recreational water illnesses: Prevention and precautionRecreational water illnesses: Prevention and precautionREnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyNAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Diarrhea;Fever;Vomiting2014-05-21T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, PEng10.000000000000054.0000000000000489.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to prevent the spread of recreational water illnesses while cooling down in pools, fountains and water parks.</p><p>Hot weather makes public pools, fountains, water parks and splash pads attractive options for some refreshing fun. But despite the sunny weather, laughter and playing, these public water areas are not all fun and games. With so many people using public water amenities, often without showering first, these areas can soon become sources of common recreational water illnesses.</p> <h2>What are recreational water illnesses?</h2><p>Recreational water illnesses are illnesses caused by bacteria or chemicals found in the water that your child swims or plays in. Bacteria can be spread by swallowing, breathing or having contact with contaminated water.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Recreational water illnesses are caused by swallowing or having contact with water that is contaminated with bacteria.</li> <li>Even if water is treated with chlorine, some bacteria take time to kill.</li> <li>Prevent the spread of recreational water illnesses by showering with soap before swimming, washing hands after using the toilet or changing diapers, and not letting a child with diarrhea go in the water.</li> <li>Remind your child not to drink or swallow the water they play in.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of recreational water illnesses</h2> <p> Recreational water illnesses can appear as many different infections, including skin, stomach, ear and eye infections. Common recreational water illness symptoms are <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> and abdominal (tummy) cramps.</p><h2>Why it is important to take precautions before entering water</h2> <p>Most parents are usually quick to remind their children not to drink water in public areas, but some find it hard to explain why their kids should rinse off before entering the water. This is especially true when many public pools use large amounts of chlorine to kill the kinds of bacteria that can lead to recreational water illnesses.</p> <p>However, some bacteria are difficult to kill. <em>Cryptosporidium</em> (or <em>Crypto</em>, for short) is one type of bacteria that can live for days, even in properly disinfected water. It can cause crypotosporidiosis, an infection that targets the intestines and can cause diarrhea.</p> <p>Another reason to take precautions is the risk of spreading infection through even very small traces of stool (poo). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States estimates that most people have about 0.14 grams of feces on their bottoms that, when washed off in a pool, can contaminate recreational water. If someone in the pool has diarrhea, their stool can contain millions of bacteria and easily contaminate the water in a large pool or water park.</p><h2>How to prevent recreational water illnesses</h2> <ul> <li>Ensure your child showers with soap before entering public water.</li> <li>Take your child on frequent bathroom breaks.</li> <li>Make sure to regularly check diapers in babies and toddlers.</li> <li>Change diapers in the bathroom, not beside the public water or on the pool deck.</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Wash your hands</a> after using the toilet or changing diapers.</li> <li>Show your child how to follow a proper hand washing routine.</li> <li>Remind your child not to swallow or drink the water.</li> <li>Do not let your child enter a public pool or other area of water if they have diarrhea.</li> </ul><h2>Sources</h2> <p>Recreational Water Illnesses. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/rwi.html.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/recreational_water_illnesses_prevention_and_precaution.jpgRecreational water illnesses: Prevention and precaution

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