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Bone health: How exercise helps strengthen bonesBBone health: How exercise helps strengthen bonesBone health: How exercise helps strengthen bonesEnglishPreventionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-12-18T05:00:00Z​Anne Murphy, RN7.0000000000000067.0000000000000390.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn what exercises are best to help make your child's bones stronger.</p><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=1938&language=English">Bones</a> respond to exercise just like muscles do. Being active can help make your child's bones healthy and strong. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>​Weight-bearing exercise helps your child's bones to become stronger.</li> <li>Examples of good weight-bearing exercises include fast walking, skipping, jogging, hiking or climbing stairs.</li> <li>If a child has poor bone health, they should avoid activities that carry a high risk of falls or injuries such as skating, hockey or rugby.</li> <li>Ask your child's doctor or nurse about what kind of activity your child should do and if they might need specific exercises.</li> </ul><h2>How much exercise can my child do if their bones are weak?</h2> <p>Children with bone health problems such as osteoporosis should do at least 30 minutes of weight-bearing exercise every day. Have your child do as much as they can without becoming very uncomfortable.</p> <h2>Are there any weight-bearing exercises that my child should avoid?</h2> <p>If your child has poor bone health, they should avoid activities and sports that carry a high risk of falls or injuries. Examples include skating, snowboarding or contact sports such as hockey or rugby.</p><h2>​Sources</h2> <p>National Institute of Health (2013). <a href="http://www.bones.nih.gov/">Publications on bone health, osteoporosis and osteogenesis imperfecta.</a></p> <p>College of Family Physicians of Canada (2011). <a href="http://www.cfpc.ca/ProjectAssets/Templates/Resource.aspx?id=3523">Osteoporosis information for patients</a></p> <p>International Osteoporosis Foundation (2013). <a href="http://www.iofbonehealth.org/content-type-semantic-meta-tags/bone-health-brochures">Bone health brochures</a></p> <p>Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation (2013). <a href="http://www.oif.org/site/DocServer/med_guide.pdf?docID=4501">Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Guide for Medical Professionals, Individuals and Families affected by OI</a>.</p>
Rôle de l’exercice physique dans la santé des osRRôle de l’exercice physique dans la santé des osBone health: How exercise helps strengthen bonesFrenchPreventionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-12-18T05:00:00Z​Anne Murphy, RN7.0000000000000067.0000000000000390.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p> Apprenez quels sont les exercices physiques les plus efficaces pour renforcer les os de votre enfant.</p><p>Les os réagissent de la même façon que les muscles aux exercices physiques. Le fait que votre enfant soit actif peut favoriser la santé et la solidité de ses os.​​ </p><br><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Les exercices avec mise en charge permettront à votre enfant de renforcer ses os.</li> <li>De bons exemples d’exercices avec mise en charge sont la marche rapide, le saut à la corde, le jogging, la randonnée pédestre et monter des escaliers.</li> <li>Les enfants dont les os ne sont pas sains devraient éviter les activités présentant des risques élevés de chutes ou de blessures comme le patin, le hockey ou le rugby.</li> <li>Demandez au médecin ou à l’infirmier prenant votre enfant en charge quelles activités physiques lui seraient bénéfiques et s’il devrait apprendre des exercices particuliers.</li> </ul><h2>Pendant combien de temps mon enfant peut-il faire des exercices vu que ses os sont fragiles?</h2> <p>Les enfants atteints de troubles des os comme l’ostéoporose devraient faire des exercices avec mise en charge quotidiennement pendant au moins 30 minutes. Assurez-vous que votre enfant en fait le plus possible sans éprouver de malaise excessif.</p> <h2>Mon enfant doit-il éviter certains exercices avec mise en charge?</h2> <p>Si les os de votre enfant ne sont pas sains, il devrait éviter les activités physiques et les sports présentant un risque élevé de chutes ou de blessures comme le patin, la planche à neige ou les sports de contact comme le hockey ou le rugby.</p> <p>National Institute of Health (2013). <a href="http://www.bones.nih.gov/">Publications on bone health, osteoporosis and osteogenesis imperfecta.</a></p> <p>College of Family Physicians of Canada (2011). <a href="http://www.cfpc.ca/ProjectAssets/Templates/Resource.aspx?id=3523">Osteoporosis information for patients</a></p> <p>International Osteoporosis Foundation (2013). <a href="http://www.iofbonehealth.org/content-type-semantic-meta-tags/bone-health-brochures">Bone health brochures</a></p> <p>Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation (2013). <a href="http://www.oif.org/site/DocServer/med_guide.pdf?docID=4501">Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Guide for Medical Professionals, Individuals and Families affected by OI</a>.</p>

 

 

Bone health: How exercise helps strengthen bones1969.00000000000Bone health: How exercise helps strengthen bonesBone health: How exercise helps strengthen bonesBEnglishPreventionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-12-18T05:00:00Z​Anne Murphy, RN7.0000000000000067.0000000000000390.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn what exercises are best to help make your child's bones stronger.</p><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=1938&language=English">Bones</a> respond to exercise just like muscles do. Being active can help make your child's bones healthy and strong. </p><h2>How does exercise help the bones?</h2> <p>Exercise helps the bones in two ways.​</p> <ul> <li>It helps to make muscles stronger, which improves co-ordination and balance. A child with good co-ordination and balance is less likely to fall or have fractures.</li> <li>It helps build bone mass, which makes bones stronger. If a person does fall, their bones are better able to take the impact and less likely to fracture.</li> </ul> <h2>What types of exercise are good for bone health?</h2> <p> Most types of weight-bearing exercise are good for the bones. Weight-bearing exercise is any exercise in which the feet and legs carry the body's weight. Good examples of weight-bearing exercise include fast walking, jogging, running, skipping, hiking, climbing stairs and dancing. </p> <p> Riding a bicycle and swimming are excellent forms of exercise for the heart, lungs and muscles, but they are not as helpful for the bones. This is because the bones support less weight when in a seated position (on a bicycle) or no weight (in water).</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>​Weight-bearing exercise helps your child's bones to become stronger.</li> <li>Examples of good weight-bearing exercises include fast walking, skipping, jogging, hiking or climbing stairs.</li> <li>If a child has poor bone health, they should avoid activities that carry a high risk of falls or injuries such as skating, hockey or rugby.</li> <li>Ask your child's doctor or nurse about what kind of activity your child should do and if they might need specific exercises.</li> </ul><h2>How can I help my child learn how to do weight-bearing exercise safely?</h2> <p>Ask your child's doctor or nurse about what kind of activity your child should do. Your child might also need to see a physiotherapist for some specific exercises that are safe for their bones.</p><h2>How much exercise can my child do if their bones are weak?</h2> <p>Children with bone health problems such as osteoporosis should do at least 30 minutes of weight-bearing exercise every day. Have your child do as much as they can without becoming very uncomfortable.</p> <h2>Are there any weight-bearing exercises that my child should avoid?</h2> <p>If your child has poor bone health, they should avoid activities and sports that carry a high risk of falls or injuries. Examples include skating, snowboarding or contact sports such as hockey or rugby.</p><h2>​Sources</h2> <p>National Institute of Health (2013). <a href="http://www.bones.nih.gov/">Publications on bone health, osteoporosis and osteogenesis imperfecta.</a></p> <p>College of Family Physicians of Canada (2011). <a href="http://www.cfpc.ca/ProjectAssets/Templates/Resource.aspx?id=3523">Osteoporosis information for patients</a></p> <p>International Osteoporosis Foundation (2013). <a href="http://www.iofbonehealth.org/content-type-semantic-meta-tags/bone-health-brochures">Bone health brochures</a></p> <p>Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation (2013). <a href="http://www.oif.org/site/DocServer/med_guide.pdf?docID=4501">Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Guide for Medical Professionals, Individuals and Families affected by OI</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/bone_health_how_exercise_helps_strengthen_bones.jpgBone health: How exercise helps strengthen bones

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