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Breastfeeding your hospitalized babyBBreastfeeding your hospitalized babyBreastfeeding your hospitalized babyEnglishDevelopmentalNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-06T05:00:00ZNA8.0000000000000068.00000000000001867.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>You can still work on breastfeeding while your baby is in the hospital. Learn how to help your baby breastfeed and take care of yourself. <br></p><p>You can still breastfeed your baby if your newborn term baby has to stay in the hospital after birth, or if your breastfeeding baby needs to be admitted to the hospital after being at home. Some babies can breastfeed during their whole time in the hospital. Most babies may not be able to breastfeed at the breast during all or part of their hospital stay, because of illness, procedures or surgery. </p><p>A nurse will give your child nutrition fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube before and after certain surgeries and procedures. </p><p>As your baby recovers from surgery, a nurse will give your child breast milk through a nasogastric (NG) tube that goes through their nose or mouth into their stomach. This tube is used until your baby is well enough to begin feeding by mouth or at your breast again. If your baby will not be able to have any food by mouth for a long period of time, a pacifier can be used to help comfort your baby by allowing them to suck. </p><br><br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Most babies may not be able to breastfeed at the breast during all or part of their hospital stay, because of their illness, procedures, or surgery. </li> <li>It is important to build up and maintain a breast milk supply for your newborn baby even if your baby cannot breastfeed. You can do this by pumping. </li> <li>Most babies need some time and some help to get used to their first feedings at the breast after hospitalization. </li> <li>Take care of yourself while your baby is in the hospital. </li> </ul><h2>Build up your milk supply even if your baby cannot breastfeed</h2> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Electric_breast_pump_simplified_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Woman using electronic breast pump" /> </figure> <p>It is important to build up and maintain a breast milk supply for your newborn baby, even if your baby cannot breastfeed. Begin pumping within six hours of your baby’s birth or as soon as you are able. Pump both breasts at the same time for 10 to 15 minutes with an approved hospital-grade double electric breast pump. Most hospitals have hospital-grade double electric pumps you can use at your baby’s bedside or nearby. Please check with your nurse or lactation consultant where to buy or rent a hospital-grade pump to use at home if you will not be able to stay in the hospital with your baby. </p><p>If you have been breastfeeding, you will need to pump your breasts the same number of times you were breastfeeding your baby within a day. Some mothers who have been breastfeeding may find if difficult to produce breast milk with a breast pump. It is important for these mothers to pump at least seven to eight times in 24 hours. </p><p>Please see <a href="/Article?contentid=1845&language=English" target="_blank">Expressing breast milk for your hospitalized baby </a>for more information about pumping and how to store and transport breast milk to the hospital.</p><h2>Helping your baby to breastfeed</h2><p>When your baby can feed at the breast, some babies eagerly latch and suck. Most babies need some time to get used to their first feedings at the breast after a hospitalization.</p><h3>Breastfeed when your baby shows signs of hunger</h3><p>Your baby will start moving, sucking and rooting when they feel hungry. Rooting is when your baby opens their mouth wide and tries to latch to your nipple and areola. The areola is the dark area around the nipple. Your baby needs to take a large mouthful of the areola, especially the part covered by their lower jaw. </p><p>Ask your nurse how to manage your baby’s care so you can put your baby to the breast as soon as you see hunger signs.</p><h3>Holding your baby<br></h3><p>Start by holding your baby close to you and facing you. Some breastfeeding positions may be better for your baby than others. Generally the recovering baby does better in a more upright position such as the football, cradle, or cross cradle position. Ask your nurse or lactation consultant for help. </p><p>Let your baby have some time to lick at the breast. You can squeeze some drops of milk onto the baby’s lips and let the baby smell and taste your milk. It is important to never try to force the baby to take the breast. If your baby's condition permits, holding your baby on your chest, upright, skin to skin, between your breasts helps your baby feel secure. Studies show your body temperature can increase by 2 degrees to keep your baby warm. Most babies relax when they feel your warmth and familiar heartbeat. They then feel comfortable to search and latch onto the breast. It may take many days to get your baby comfortable at your breast. </p><h3>A nipple shield helps the baby become more comfortable at the breast</h3><p>A baby who has only been able to suck on a soother for a long period of time may not recognize your breast as a place to feed. Try not to take this as a sign your baby does not want to breastfeed. </p><p>A nipple shield made of silicone is used to help the baby become more comfortable at the breast. A soft but firm nipple shield made of silicone is placed over the mother’s nipple. It is used to help mimic the familiar texture of the soother to "trick" the baby onto the breast. The shield is used until your baby eagerly roots and latches to the breast. The baby is then ready to breastfeed from your nipple alone. The time needed for this to happen varies from baby to baby.</p><p>A lactation consultant will advise if you need to use a nipple shield, provide the appropriate size shield, and see how well your baby breastfeeds with it in place. You will need to pump after feeding until the baby takes full feedings with the nipple shield. The amount of milk the baby takes with the nipple shield is closely monitored. The intake can be monitored by test weighing.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Nipple_shields_EQUIP_ILL_EN.png" alt="A non-contact nipple shield and a contact nipple attached to breasts" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The contact nipple shield has a cut away that allows your baby sensory contact with the breast.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Helping your baby with feeding coordination</h3><p>A baby needs to coordinate sucking, swallowing and breathing. This is not as easy as it may seem.</p><p>If you have a large milk volume or fast let-down, it helps to pump off some milk before latching your baby. The decreased milk flow and volume allows your baby to better coordinate suck, swallow or breathe as they return to breastfeeding. </p><p>If your baby exhibits difficulty with feeding coordination, an occupational therapist may be asked to assess your baby’s ability to suck and swallow safely.</p><h3>Using breast compressions</h3><p>Once your baby is latched and sucking well you may notice your baby getting tired before taking a full feed. Once you do not hear your baby swallowing, use “breast compressions” to allow your baby to receive more breast milk. You will squeeze the breast between your thumb on one side of the breast and your four fingers on the other side. Your thumb and fingers need to be well back of the areola. You squeeze the breast as long as the baby is sucking and stop when the baby stops sucking. Watch that your baby is swallowing the breast milk without difficulty.</p><h2>Low milk supply</h2><p>Some women find their milk supply decreases or changes once the baby is hospitalized. Stress can decrease your breast milk supply. Your breast milk supply can also be affected by your emotional state as your baby’s condition changes. You may find that your supply decreases the day your baby has surgery or procedures. As your baby recovers, your milk supply usually increases with regular pumping. </p><p>It is important to maintain your pumping regimen even though your milk volume is less than you expect. Some women pump less volume with a pump than their baby would take from their breast. Once your baby begins to breastfeed again, your milk volume usually increases.</p><p>You can arrange a referral with a lactation consultant if your breast milk supply does not increase with regular pumping.</p><h3>"Power pumping" is used to help increase breast milk</h3><p>"Power pumping" is used to help increase breast milk volume.</p><p>When you are near your baby, there is usually an increase in the amount of hormones that produce breast milk. When you are in the hospital with your baby, we suggest you spend 20 to 30 minutes holding or sitting near your baby and then pumping. You can repeat this every 1.5 to 2 hours while you are in hospital. Because you are pumping more often, you will get less milk per pump session, but the total number of pump times over 24 hours will increase your breast milk. </p><p>When you start to pump more often , you will usually not see an increase for two to three days.<br></p>
Allaitement de votre bébé hospitaliséAAllaitement de votre bébé hospitaliséBreastfeeding your hospitalized babyFrenchDevelopmentalNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-06T05:00:00ZNA8.0000000000000068.00000000000001867.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Vous pouvez toujours travailler sur l’allaitement maternel alors que votre bébé est à l’hôpital. Apprenez à aider votre bébé à boire au sein et à prendre soin de vous. </p><p>Vous pouvez tout de même allaiter votre nouveau-né s’il doit demeurer à l’hôpital après sa naissance ou s’il doit être hospitalisé après être rentré à la maison. Certains bébés peuvent être allaités pendant toute la période d’hospitalisation. La plupart des bébés ne peuvent parfois pas être allaités pendant leur hospitalisation, ou pendant une partie de leur séjour à l’hôpital, à cause de leur maladie, des interventions ou d’une chirurgie.</p><p>Une infirmière donnera des fluides par un tube intraveineux (IV) avant et après certaines chirurgies et interventions.</p><p>Alors que votre enfant se rétablira, un infirmier lui donnera votre lait maternel par un tube naso-gastrique (NG) qui entre par son nez ou sa bouche et se rend dans son estomac. Ce tube sera utilisé jusqu’à ce que votre enfant soit suffisamment bien pour se nourrir de nouveau par la bouche ou au sein. Si votre bébé n'est pas en mesure d'avaler pendant une longue période, une sucette pourrait être utile pour réconforter votre bébé en lui permettant de téter.</p><br><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Il se peut que la plupart des bébés ne soient pas capables de se nourrir au sein pendant leur hospitalisation, ou pendant une partie de leur séjour à l’hôpital, à cause de leur maladie, des interventions ou d’une chirurgie.</li> <li>Il est important de faire et de maintenir des réserves de lait maternel pour votre nouveau-né, même s’il n’est pas en mesure de téter. Il vous suffit pour cela de tirer votre lait.</li> <li>La plupart des bébés ont besoin de temps et d’aide pour s'habituer aux premiers allaitements au sein après leur hospitalisation.</li> <li>Prenez soin de vous pendant que votre enfant est à l’hôpital.</li> </ul><h2>Faire des réserves de lait même si votre enfant ne peut pas être allaité</h2> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Electric_breast_pump_simplified_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Femme utilisant un tire-lait double électrique" /> </figure> <p>Il est important de faire et de maintenir des réserves de lait maternel pour votre nouveau-né, même s’il n’est pas en mesure de téter. Commencez à tirer votre lait dans les six heures suivant la naissance de votre bébé ou dès que vous le pouvez. Tirez le lait des deux seins en même temps pendant de 10 à 15 minutes au moyen d’un tire-lait double électrique utilisé dans les hôpitaux. La plupart des hôpitaux peuvent vous en prêter un que vous pouvez utiliser en vous installant près du lit de votre bébé ou à proximité de votre bébé. Veuillez vérifier auprès de votre infirmière ou d’une consultante en allaitement pour savoir où acheter ou louer un tire-lait comme ceux que l’on utilise dans les hôpitaux, afin de l’utiliser à la maison, si vous ne pouvez pas demeurer à l’hôpital avec votre bébé. </p><p>Si vous aviez déjà commencé à allaiter votre enfant, vous devrez tirer votre lait le même nombre de fois que vous allaitiez votre enfant par jour. Certaines mères qui ont allaité trouvent qu’il est difficile de produire du lait maternel avec un tire-lait. Il est important que ces mères tirent leur lait sept ou huit fois en 24 heures.</p><h2>Aider votre bébé à téter</h2><p>Lorsque les bébés peuvent téter, certains prennent le sein et sucent impatiemment. La plupart des bébés ont besoin de temps pour s’habituer à se nourrir au sein après une hospitalisation.</p><h3>L’allaitement lorsque votre bébé montre des signes de faim</h3><p>Votre bébé commencera à bouger, à sucer et à avoir le réflexe des points cardinaux lorsqu’il a faim. Le réflexe des points cardinaux est en fait lorsque votre bébé ouvre la bouche toute grande et tente de prendre votre mamelon et votre aréole. L’aréole est la partie foncée autour du mamelon. Votre bébé doit mettre l’aréole dans sa bouche, particulièrement la partie recouverte par sa mâchoire inférieure. </p><p>Demandez à votre infirmier comment gérer les soins de votre enfant afin que vous puissiez allaiter votre enfant dès que vous observez des signes de faim.</p><h3>Tenir votre bébé</h3><p>Commencez par tenir votre bébé près de vous et face à vous. Certaines positions d’allaitement peuvent être plus confortables que d’autres pour votre bébé. Habituellement, le bébé qui se rétablit est plus à l'aise dans une position droite, comme la position d’un ballon de rugby ou d’un berceau. Demandez de l’aide à votre infirmier ou votre consultant en allaitement.</p><p>Laissez à votre bébé le temps de lécher le sein. Vous pouvez presser votre sein afin que quelques gouttes s’en échappent sur les lèvres du bébé et laisser le bébé sentir et goûter votre lait. Il est important de ne jamais forcer le bébé à prendre le sein. Si l’état de votre bébé le permet, tenez le sur votre poitrine en position droite, peau sur peau, entre vos seins afin qu’il se sente en sécurité, Des études ont révélé que votre température corporelle peut augmenter de deux degrés pour garder votre bébé au chaud. La plupart des bébés se détendent lorsqu’ils ressentent votre chaleur et un battement de cœur familier. Ils se sentent alors à l’aise de rechercher et de prendre le sein. L’adaptation de votre bébé à votre sein pourrait prendre plusieurs jours. </p><h3>Un «bout de sein» aide le bébé à devenir plus à l’aise au sein</h3><p>Un bébé qui a seulement tété une tétine pendant une longue période pourrait ne pas reconnaître votre sein comme un moyen de se nourrir. Essayez de ne pas considérer cela comme signe que votre enfant ne veut pas être allaité au sein.</p><p>Il est possible d’utiliser « un bout de sein » en silicone pour aider le bébé s'habituer à votre sein. Un « un bout de sein » doux et ferme en silicone est placé sur le mamelon de la mère. Il est utilisé pour aider à imiter la texture familière de la tétine en vue de « tromper » le bébé. Ce « un bout de sein » est utilisé jusqu’à ce que votre bébé ait le réflexe des points cardinaux et qu’il prenne le sein avec impatience. À ce moment, le bébé est prêt à se nourrir directement à votre mamelon. Le temps requis pour que cela se produise est différent pour chaque bébé.</p><p>Une consultante en allaitement vous dira si vous avez besoin d’utiliser un « un bout de sein », vous précisera la taille qui convient et observera comment votre bébé s’en sort avec le « un bout de sein ». Vous devrez tirer votre lait après l’allaitement jusqu’à ce que le bébé se nourrisse entièrement avec le « un bout de sein ». La quantité de lait que le bébé ingère avec le « un bout de sein » est surveillée attentivement. La quantité ingérée peut être contrôlée par la mesure du poids.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Nipple_shields_EQUIP_ILL_FR.png" alt="Des seins avec tétine sans contact et avec tétine de contact" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Une partie de la tétine de contact a été enlevée pour que l'enfant puisse avoir du contact sensoriel avec le sein.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Aider votre bébé pour la coordination de l’allaitement</h3><p>Un bébé doit coordonner les actions de téter, d’avaler et de respirer. Cela n’est pas si facile.</p><p>Si vous avez une grande quantité de lait ou un déblocage rapide, il est utile de tirer une certaine quantité de lait avant que le bébé prenne le sein. La diminution du flux et du volume de lait permet à votre enfant de mieux coordonner les actions de tété, d’avaler et de respirer lorsqu’il recommence à se nourrir au sein.</p><p>Si votre bébé semble avoir de la difficulté à coordonner l’allaitement, il est possible de demander à un ergothérapeute d’évaluer la capacité de votre bébé de téter et d’avaler en toute sécurité.</p><h3>Utiliser la compression du sein</h3><p>Lorsque votre bébé est à votre sein et qu’il tète bien, il se peut que vous remarquiez qu’il semble fatigué avant d’avoir terminé l’allaitement complet. Lorsque vous n’entendez pas votre bébé téter, utilisez les « compressions du sein » pour permettre à votre bébé de recevoir plus de lait. Vous compresserez le sein avec un pouce d’un côté du sein et vos doigts de l’autre côté. Votre pouce et vos doigts devront être placés loin de l’aréole. Vous pouvez compressez le sein aussi longtemps que votre bébé tète, et arrêter lorsque votre bébé s'arrête. Assurez vous que votre bébé avale le lait sans difficulté.</p><h2>Faible lactation</h2> <p>Certaines femmes trouvent que leur lactation (production de lait) diminue ou change une fois que le bébé est hospitalisé. Le stress peut diminuer votre production de lait. Votre état émotionnel, lorsque l’état de santé de votre bébé change, peut également avoir une incidence sur votre production. Vous remarquer peut-être que votre lactation diminue le jour où votre bébé subit une chirurgie ou des interventions. Habituellement, au fur et à mesure que votre bébé se rétablit, votre lactation augmente avec un tirage régulier. </p> <p>Il est important de maintenir votre régime de tirage, même si votre volume de lait est inférieur à vos attentes. Certaines femmes tirent moins de lait lorsqu’elles utilisent un tire-lait que lorsque leur enfant se nourrit directement au sein. Habituellement, lorsque votre bébé se remet à boire au sein, votre volume de lait augmente.</p> <p>Vous pouvez obtenir un rendez-vous avec une consultante en allaitement si votre sécrétion de lait maternel n’augmente pas avec un tirage régulier.</p> <h3>Le « tirage puissant » est utilisé pour augmenter le lait maternel</h3> <p>Le « tirage puissant » est utilisés pour aider à augmenter le volume de lait maternel.</p> <p>Lorsque vous êtes près de votre bébé, il se produit habituellement une augmentation de la quantité d’hormones qui induisent la production de lait maternel. Lorsque vous êtes à l’hôpital avec votre bébé, nous vous suggérons de passer 20 à 30 minutes à tenir votre bébé ou assise près de lui avant de commencer à tirer votre lait. Vous pouvez répéter cette astuce toutes les heures et demi ou deux heures lorsque vous êtes à l’hôpital. Puisque vous tirez votre lait plus souvent, vous obtiendrez moins de lait à tous les tirages, mais le nombre total de tirages pendant 24 heures fera augmenter votre quantité de lait maternel.</p> <p>Lorsque vous commencer à tirer votre lait plus souvent, il faut habituellement deux ou trois jours avant de constater une augmentation.</p>

 

 

Breastfeeding your hospitalized baby1971.00000000000Breastfeeding your hospitalized babyBreastfeeding your hospitalized babyBEnglishDevelopmentalNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-06T05:00:00ZNA8.0000000000000068.00000000000001867.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>You can still work on breastfeeding while your baby is in the hospital. Learn how to help your baby breastfeed and take care of yourself. <br></p><p>You can still breastfeed your baby if your newborn term baby has to stay in the hospital after birth, or if your breastfeeding baby needs to be admitted to the hospital after being at home. Some babies can breastfeed during their whole time in the hospital. Most babies may not be able to breastfeed at the breast during all or part of their hospital stay, because of illness, procedures or surgery. </p><p>A nurse will give your child nutrition fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube before and after certain surgeries and procedures. </p><p>As your baby recovers from surgery, a nurse will give your child breast milk through a nasogastric (NG) tube that goes through their nose or mouth into their stomach. This tube is used until your baby is well enough to begin feeding by mouth or at your breast again. If your baby will not be able to have any food by mouth for a long period of time, a pacifier can be used to help comfort your baby by allowing them to suck. </p><br><br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Most babies may not be able to breastfeed at the breast during all or part of their hospital stay, because of their illness, procedures, or surgery. </li> <li>It is important to build up and maintain a breast milk supply for your newborn baby even if your baby cannot breastfeed. You can do this by pumping. </li> <li>Most babies need some time and some help to get used to their first feedings at the breast after hospitalization. </li> <li>Take care of yourself while your baby is in the hospital. </li> </ul><h2>Taking care of yourself while your baby is in the hospital</h2> <p>Having a baby in hospital is tiring for the mother. There are many procedures as well as the concern about your baby’s condition that interrupt your normal routine for you and your baby. It is important that you try and get adequate rest and nutrition. Remember you need to drink enough that you are not thirsty and to have healthy meals and snacks throughout 24 hours. </p> <p>Many mothers have other children to care for as well. Try to get help from friends and relatives to take care of your other children, so that you can be in the hospital with your baby. Try not to feel guilty if this is just not possible. </p> <p>Try to maintain your milk supply and work on getting your baby to breastfeed at home. You may find that your breastfeeding baby has shorter feeds more frequently than when your baby was on the hospital schedule. This is a normal part of recovery until your baby is well and gets back to previous feeding routines. </p> <p>Going through a hospitalization can be difficult. Reach out to staff to get the help you need. Lactation consultants can help you with breastfeeding and breast milk supply. Doctors, nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, chaplains and volunteers can also help you understand and care for your baby. Once you are at home you can find help with breastfeeding from your local breastfeeding clinics and local health connections. </p><h2>Build up your milk supply even if your baby cannot breastfeed</h2> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Electric_breast_pump_simplified_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Woman using electronic breast pump" /> </figure> <p>It is important to build up and maintain a breast milk supply for your newborn baby, even if your baby cannot breastfeed. Begin pumping within six hours of your baby’s birth or as soon as you are able. Pump both breasts at the same time for 10 to 15 minutes with an approved hospital-grade double electric breast pump. Most hospitals have hospital-grade double electric pumps you can use at your baby’s bedside or nearby. Please check with your nurse or lactation consultant where to buy or rent a hospital-grade pump to use at home if you will not be able to stay in the hospital with your baby. </p><p>If you have been breastfeeding, you will need to pump your breasts the same number of times you were breastfeeding your baby within a day. Some mothers who have been breastfeeding may find if difficult to produce breast milk with a breast pump. It is important for these mothers to pump at least seven to eight times in 24 hours. </p><p>Please see <a href="/Article?contentid=1845&language=English" target="_blank">Expressing breast milk for your hospitalized baby </a>for more information about pumping and how to store and transport breast milk to the hospital.</p><h2>Helping your baby to breastfeed</h2><p>When your baby can feed at the breast, some babies eagerly latch and suck. Most babies need some time to get used to their first feedings at the breast after a hospitalization.</p><h3>Breastfeed when your baby shows signs of hunger</h3><p>Your baby will start moving, sucking and rooting when they feel hungry. Rooting is when your baby opens their mouth wide and tries to latch to your nipple and areola. The areola is the dark area around the nipple. Your baby needs to take a large mouthful of the areola, especially the part covered by their lower jaw. </p><p>Ask your nurse how to manage your baby’s care so you can put your baby to the breast as soon as you see hunger signs.</p><h3>Holding your baby<br></h3><p>Start by holding your baby close to you and facing you. Some breastfeeding positions may be better for your baby than others. Generally the recovering baby does better in a more upright position such as the football, cradle, or cross cradle position. Ask your nurse or lactation consultant for help. </p><p>Let your baby have some time to lick at the breast. You can squeeze some drops of milk onto the baby’s lips and let the baby smell and taste your milk. It is important to never try to force the baby to take the breast. If your baby's condition permits, holding your baby on your chest, upright, skin to skin, between your breasts helps your baby feel secure. Studies show your body temperature can increase by 2 degrees to keep your baby warm. Most babies relax when they feel your warmth and familiar heartbeat. They then feel comfortable to search and latch onto the breast. It may take many days to get your baby comfortable at your breast. </p><h3>A nipple shield helps the baby become more comfortable at the breast</h3><p>A baby who has only been able to suck on a soother for a long period of time may not recognize your breast as a place to feed. Try not to take this as a sign your baby does not want to breastfeed. </p><p>A nipple shield made of silicone is used to help the baby become more comfortable at the breast. A soft but firm nipple shield made of silicone is placed over the mother’s nipple. It is used to help mimic the familiar texture of the soother to "trick" the baby onto the breast. The shield is used until your baby eagerly roots and latches to the breast. The baby is then ready to breastfeed from your nipple alone. The time needed for this to happen varies from baby to baby.</p><p>A lactation consultant will advise if you need to use a nipple shield, provide the appropriate size shield, and see how well your baby breastfeeds with it in place. You will need to pump after feeding until the baby takes full feedings with the nipple shield. The amount of milk the baby takes with the nipple shield is closely monitored. The intake can be monitored by test weighing.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Nipple_shields_EQUIP_ILL_EN.png" alt="A non-contact nipple shield and a contact nipple attached to breasts" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The contact nipple shield has a cut away that allows your baby sensory contact with the breast.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Helping your baby with feeding coordination</h3><p>A baby needs to coordinate sucking, swallowing and breathing. This is not as easy as it may seem.</p><p>If you have a large milk volume or fast let-down, it helps to pump off some milk before latching your baby. The decreased milk flow and volume allows your baby to better coordinate suck, swallow or breathe as they return to breastfeeding. </p><p>If your baby exhibits difficulty with feeding coordination, an occupational therapist may be asked to assess your baby’s ability to suck and swallow safely.</p><h3>Using breast compressions</h3><p>Once your baby is latched and sucking well you may notice your baby getting tired before taking a full feed. Once you do not hear your baby swallowing, use “breast compressions” to allow your baby to receive more breast milk. You will squeeze the breast between your thumb on one side of the breast and your four fingers on the other side. Your thumb and fingers need to be well back of the areola. You squeeze the breast as long as the baby is sucking and stop when the baby stops sucking. Watch that your baby is swallowing the breast milk without difficulty.</p><h2>How much your baby is breastfeeding</h2><p>In hospital, the medical team needs to know more accurately how much the baby is taking when breastfeeding. The baby can be weighed before you breastfeed and again afterward. The difference in weights in grams tells us how much the baby breastfed. One gram is considered 1 mL of breast milk. </p><p>For more information, please see <a href="/Article?contentid=1972&language=English" target="_blank">Breastfeeding: Test weighing your baby.</a> </p><p>Once your baby is breastfeeding again at home, you will be able to tell your baby is getting enough breast milk by observing how your baby sucks and swallows when breastfeeding, how many wet and soiled diapers your baby has in 24 hours, and how your baby gains weight. </p><p>For more information, please see <a href="/Article?contentid=634&language=English" target="_blank">Breastfeeding: How do you know your baby is getting enough milk? </a></p><p>If you are only breastfeeding at the breast, it is very important for your baby to be seen and weighed by your medical caregiver or at a breastfeeding clinic two days after your baby’s discharge from hospital. </p><h2>Low milk supply</h2><p>Some women find their milk supply decreases or changes once the baby is hospitalized. Stress can decrease your breast milk supply. Your breast milk supply can also be affected by your emotional state as your baby’s condition changes. You may find that your supply decreases the day your baby has surgery or procedures. As your baby recovers, your milk supply usually increases with regular pumping. </p><p>It is important to maintain your pumping regimen even though your milk volume is less than you expect. Some women pump less volume with a pump than their baby would take from their breast. Once your baby begins to breastfeed again, your milk volume usually increases.</p><p>You can arrange a referral with a lactation consultant if your breast milk supply does not increase with regular pumping.</p><h3>"Power pumping" is used to help increase breast milk</h3><p>"Power pumping" is used to help increase breast milk volume.</p><p>When you are near your baby, there is usually an increase in the amount of hormones that produce breast milk. When you are in the hospital with your baby, we suggest you spend 20 to 30 minutes holding or sitting near your baby and then pumping. You can repeat this every 1.5 to 2 hours while you are in hospital. Because you are pumping more often, you will get less milk per pump session, but the total number of pump times over 24 hours will increase your breast milk. </p><p>When you start to pump more often , you will usually not see an increase for two to three days.<br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Electric_breast_pump_simplified_MED_ILL_EN.jpgBreastfeeding your hospitalized babyFalse

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