Tooth injury: First aidTTooth injury: First aidTooth injury: First aidEnglishDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TeethMouthNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-04-08T04:00:00ZMichael J. Casas, DDS, MSc, FRCD(C)7.0000000000000076.0000000000000408.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Provides tips on what to do if your child has a tooth injury.</p><p>Injuries to children’s teeth are common. Injuries can range from minor chipping to a knocked out tooth. Both <a href="/Article?contentid=304&language=English">baby teeth</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=1994&language=English">permanent teeth</a> can be injured.</p><p>When giving first aid treatment to a toddler or young child with a tooth injury, the goal is to prevent additional harm to the permanent teeth that are developing below the baby teeth.</p> <h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Injuries to children's teeth are common and can range from minor chipping to a knocked out tooth.</li> <li>If your child has a loose tooth due to injury or a minor chip, take them to the dentist.</li> <li>If your child has broken, loosened or knocked out a permanent tooth, see a dentist right away. If the tooth was knocked out, rinse it in water and try to place it back in the socket. If that will not work, store the tooth in a cup of milk, in a cooler with ice, and bring it with your child to the dentist.</li> </ul><h2>How tooth injuries are treated</h2> <p>If your child has a loose tooth or a minor chip, take them to the dentist. Your child’s dentist will assess the damage and smooth any sharp edges.</p> <p>A broken, loosened or knocked out permanent tooth is considered an emergency. For a completely knocked out tooth, gently rinse the permanent tooth in water and immediately place it back in the tooth socket before you take your child to the dentist. In some cases, a knocked-out permanent tooth can be saved if it is replaced right away in its proper position in the mouth. Your child should keep the tooth in place with a finger or by biting on a gauze pad.</p> <p>If you cannot put the tooth back into the tooth socket, place it in a cup of milk. Do not place the tooth in water, carbonated soda or salt water. Pack the cup in a cooler with some ice and take it and your child to the dentist right away.</p>
Blessure à une dent : premiers soinsBBlessure à une dent : premiers soinsTooth injury: First aidFrenchDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TeethMouthNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-04-08T04:00:00ZMichael J. Casas, DDS, MSc, FRCD(C)Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Offre des conseils sur ce qu’il faut faire si votre enfant présente une blessure dentaire.</p><p>Les blessures aux dents chez les enfants sont fréquentes. Les blessures peuvent aller d’une ébréchure mineure à la perte d’une dent. Les <a href="/Article?contentid=304&language=French">dents de lait</a> comme des <a href="/Article?contentid=1994&language=French">dents permanentes</a> peuvent être endommagées. </p><p>Lorsque vous donnez les premiers soins à un tout-petit ou à un jeune enfant atteint d’une blessure à une dent, le but est de prévenir des dommages additionnels aux dents permanentes qui se développent sous les dents de lait. </p><h2>À retenir </h2><ul><li>Les blessures aux dents sont fréquentes chez les enfants et peuvent aller d’une ébréchure mineure à une dent arrachée. </li> <li>Si une dent de votre enfant devient branlante à la suite d’une blessure ou présente une ébréchure mineure, conduisez-le chez le dentiste. </li><li>Si votre enfant présente une dent permanente brisée, ébranlée ou arrachée, consultez un dentiste immédiatement. Si la dent a été arrachée, rincez-là avec de l’eau et essayez de la replacer dans son alvéole dentaire. Si cela ne fonctionne pas, rangez-la dans une tasse de lait, dans une glacière avec de la glace, et apportez-là, ainsi que votre enfant, chez le dentiste. </li></ul><h2>De quelle façon les blessures dentaires sont-elles traitées </h2><p>Si votre enfant présente une dent branlante ou une ébréchure mineure, conduisez-le chez le dentiste. Le dentiste de votre enfant évaluera le dommage et adoucira les arêtes tranchantes s’il y a lieu. </p> <p>SUne dent permanente brisée, ébranlée ou arrachée est considérée comme une urgence. Pour une dent complètement arrachée, rincez doucement la dent permanente avec de l’eau et replacée-là immédiatement dans son alvéole dentaire avant de conduire votre enfant chez le dentiste. Dans certains cas, une dent permanente qui a été arrachée peut être sauvée si elle est replacée immédiatement à sa place dans la bouche. Votre enfant devra tenir la dent en place avec son doigt ou en mordant dans un tampon de gaze. </p><p>SSi vous ne pouvez pas remettre la dent dans son alvéole dentaire, placez-la dans une tasse de lait. Ne placez pas la dent dans l’eau, dans une boisson gazeuse ni de l’eau salée. Placez la tasse dans une glacière avec de la glace et emmenez-là immédiatement, ainsi que votre enfant, chez le dentiste. </p>

 

 

Tooth injury: First aid1995.00000000000Tooth injury: First aidTooth injury: First aidTEnglishDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TeethMouthNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-04-08T04:00:00ZMichael J. Casas, DDS, MSc, FRCD(C)7.0000000000000076.0000000000000408.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Provides tips on what to do if your child has a tooth injury.</p><p>Injuries to children’s teeth are common. Injuries can range from minor chipping to a knocked out tooth. Both <a href="/Article?contentid=304&language=English">baby teeth</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=1994&language=English">permanent teeth</a> can be injured.</p><p>When giving first aid treatment to a toddler or young child with a tooth injury, the goal is to prevent additional harm to the permanent teeth that are developing below the baby teeth.</p> <h2>Causes of tooth injuries</h2> <p>Children may injure their teeth as a result of falls, playground accidents, flying objects such as Frisbees and balls, or sport-related injuries.</p> <h2>Types of tooth injuries</h2> <p>Your child may have the following type of tooth injury:</p> <ul> <li>a minor chip</li> <li>a major chip</li> <li>a serious fracture that exposes the nerve and blood vessels in the centre of the tooth</li> <li>a displaced tooth, in which the tooth is forced upward, downward or to the side</li> <li>a knocked out (avulsed) tooth.</li> </ul><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Injuries to children's teeth are common and can range from minor chipping to a knocked out tooth.</li> <li>If your child has a loose tooth due to injury or a minor chip, take them to the dentist.</li> <li>If your child has broken, loosened or knocked out a permanent tooth, see a dentist right away. If the tooth was knocked out, rinse it in water and try to place it back in the socket. If that will not work, store the tooth in a cup of milk, in a cooler with ice, and bring it with your child to the dentist.</li> </ul><h2>How tooth injuries are treated</h2> <p>If your child has a loose tooth or a minor chip, take them to the dentist. Your child’s dentist will assess the damage and smooth any sharp edges.</p> <p>A broken, loosened or knocked out permanent tooth is considered an emergency. For a completely knocked out tooth, gently rinse the permanent tooth in water and immediately place it back in the tooth socket before you take your child to the dentist. In some cases, a knocked-out permanent tooth can be saved if it is replaced right away in its proper position in the mouth. Your child should keep the tooth in place with a finger or by biting on a gauze pad.</p> <p>If you cannot put the tooth back into the tooth socket, place it in a cup of milk. Do not place the tooth in water, carbonated soda or salt water. Pack the cup in a cooler with some ice and take it and your child to the dentist right away.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/tooth_injury_first_aid.jpgTooth injury: First aid

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