Medicines: How to use safelyMMedicines: How to use safelyMedicines: How to use safelyEnglishPharmacyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-10-29T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc;Amelia Mascarenhas, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh8.0000000000000062.00000000000001272.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Includes advice on how to store and what to do if your child misses a dose.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tDpDEhTxTyo?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> </div><p>Medicines are given to your child to heal and strengthen. However, medicines can hurt your child when taken inappropriately. Before you give your child any medicine, you will meet with the <a href="/Article?contentid=1169&language=English">pharmacist</a>. The pharmacist will explain what medications your child needs to take, why, and how to safely give your child the medicine. Talk to the pharmacist about any of your questions or concerns. They are a helpful resource. They may also give you some written information about the medicine for you to take home.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Give your child the medicines exactly as the doctor or pharmacist advises.</li> <li>How long your child needs to take medication depends on the type and severity of the condition your child has, as well as the type of treatment they are receiving.</li> <li>Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you what to look out for and how to manage both short-term and long-term side effects. Check with your doctor if your child has an unexpected reaction to a medicine.<br></li> <li>Keep a list of all the medicines your child is taking, including prescription drugs, non-prescription drugs and herbal supplements as some of them may interact with your child’s medications. Show this list to your doctor and pharmacist.</li> </ul><h2>How do you read a medication label?</h2> <h3>On the label, you will see:</h3> <ul> <li>your child's name</li> <li>the name of the medication (generic and brand name)</li> <li>the strength of the medication (e.g. the concentration of liquid medication or the amount of medicine in each pill)</li> <li>the quantity of medication provided</li> <li>instructions for how the medicine should be taken</li> <li>the doctor's name</li> <li>the name and the telephone number of the pharmacy where you got the prescription filled</li> </ul> <h2>How are medicines measured?</h2> <p>Medication taken by mouth is measured by weight, usually milligrams (mg), micrograms (mcg), grams (g) or international units (IU).</p> <p>Many children receive their medications in the form of a liquid. The amount of medication measured is expressed in millilitres (mL). Be sure you know the amount of liquid your child needs to take. Shake the liquid well before giving it to your child. Your pharmacy will often provide you with a special measuring device to help you measure the amount of medication accurately. Do not use kitchen spoons. They do not accurately measure doses.</p> <p>It is important to know the concentration (strength) of any liquid medication. The concentration is how much medication is contained in a measured amount of liquid. For example, a concentration of 5 mg per millilitre (5 mg/mL) means there is 5 mg of medication in each mL of liquid. Some medications are available in different concentrations. When you refill your child's prescription, always check the label to make sure the concentration has not changed.</p> <p>To find out the total dose, multiply the volume by the concentration. For example, if you need to give your child 10 mL of liquid medication with a concentration of 5 mg/mL, the total dose is 50 mg: 10 mL x 5 mg/mL = 50 mg</p>

 

 

Medicines: How to use safely1996.00000000000Medicines: How to use safelyMedicines: How to use safelyMEnglishPharmacyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-10-29T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc;Amelia Mascarenhas, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh8.0000000000000062.00000000000001272.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Includes advice on how to store and what to do if your child misses a dose.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tDpDEhTxTyo?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> </div><p>Medicines are given to your child to heal and strengthen. However, medicines can hurt your child when taken inappropriately. Before you give your child any medicine, you will meet with the <a href="/Article?contentid=1169&language=English">pharmacist</a>. The pharmacist will explain what medications your child needs to take, why, and how to safely give your child the medicine. Talk to the pharmacist about any of your questions or concerns. They are a helpful resource. They may also give you some written information about the medicine for you to take home.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Give your child the medicines exactly as the doctor or pharmacist advises.</li> <li>How long your child needs to take medication depends on the type and severity of the condition your child has, as well as the type of treatment they are receiving.</li> <li>Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you what to look out for and how to manage both short-term and long-term side effects. Check with your doctor if your child has an unexpected reaction to a medicine.<br></li> <li>Keep a list of all the medicines your child is taking, including prescription drugs, non-prescription drugs and herbal supplements as some of them may interact with your child’s medications. Show this list to your doctor and pharmacist.</li> </ul><h2>How you can help your child take medicines</h2><p>If your child is very young, you will need to give them the medicine. If your child is older, you can help establish a routine at home to help them remember when to take the medicine. This might include the use of a medication calendar, a dosette (pill box), or simply encouraging your child to take the medicine at the same time each day.</p><p>If you are giving your child medicine at home, check the label. Follow the instructions in terms of how much medicine should be given, how often it needs to be taken and how to give the medication (with a meal or on an empty stomach).</p><p>Medication only works properly if it is taken exactly as directed for as long as directed. Sometimes, it is tempting to stop taking medication if symptoms seem to disappear. But it is important to always complete the medicine. This is particularly true for antibiotics.<br></p><h2>How do you read a medication label?</h2> <h3>On the label, you will see:</h3> <ul> <li>your child's name</li> <li>the name of the medication (generic and brand name)</li> <li>the strength of the medication (e.g. the concentration of liquid medication or the amount of medicine in each pill)</li> <li>the quantity of medication provided</li> <li>instructions for how the medicine should be taken</li> <li>the doctor's name</li> <li>the name and the telephone number of the pharmacy where you got the prescription filled</li> </ul> <h2>How are medicines measured?</h2> <p>Medication taken by mouth is measured by weight, usually milligrams (mg), micrograms (mcg), grams (g) or international units (IU).</p> <p>Many children receive their medications in the form of a liquid. The amount of medication measured is expressed in millilitres (mL). Be sure you know the amount of liquid your child needs to take. Shake the liquid well before giving it to your child. Your pharmacy will often provide you with a special measuring device to help you measure the amount of medication accurately. Do not use kitchen spoons. They do not accurately measure doses.</p> <p>It is important to know the concentration (strength) of any liquid medication. The concentration is how much medication is contained in a measured amount of liquid. For example, a concentration of 5 mg per millilitre (5 mg/mL) means there is 5 mg of medication in each mL of liquid. Some medications are available in different concentrations. When you refill your child's prescription, always check the label to make sure the concentration has not changed.</p> <p>To find out the total dose, multiply the volume by the concentration. For example, if you need to give your child 10 mL of liquid medication with a concentration of 5 mg/mL, the total dose is 50 mg: 10 mL x 5 mg/mL = 50 mg</p><h2>How long will your child need to take medication?</h2> <p>This depends on the type and severity of your child’s condition, and the type of treatment. Some medications need to be taken for a short time, while some need to be taken for life. Your child's doctor or health-care provider will discuss this with you.</p> <h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of medicine?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of this medicine:</p> <ul> <li>give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time.</li> <li>do not give two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li> </ul><h2>How safe are the medications?</h2> <p>Medications can have short-term and long-term side effects. Your child's doctor or pharmacist will tell you what to look out for and how to manage these side effects. Check with your child's doctor if your child has an unexpected reaction to a medication. If your child accidentally takes too much of the medication, call the Ontario Poison Centre. </p> <h3>Herbal supplements or products from the health food store</h3> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=1681&language=English">Discuss herbal supplements</a> with your child's doctor or pharmacist before your child starts using them. For the most part, supplements are less studied than conventional medications. Often there is little evidence to support their use. Some are known to cause dangerous side effects or interact with prescription medication your child may be taking. The same holds true for "specialty teas" or so-called "herbal remedies" that are used topically or come in liquid form. Your pharmacist is also a good person to talk to about these products. </p> <p>If you decide to use herbal supplements after discussing their use with your child's doctor, purchase supplements that are identified as pharmaceutical grade. This indicates some degree of quality control when it comes to purity. These are often available at pharmacies. Also, look for supplements with an NPN (natural product number). Health Canada labels herbal products that meet their quality control standards with an NPN.</p> <h2>Medication safety tips</h2> <h3>The following tips can help you to give your child medicine safely:</h3> <ul> <li>If the pharmacist gives you a bottle of pills that are a different colour, shape or size than you were expecting, ask to be sure it is the correct medication. </li> <li>Watch for any changes in the label when you refill the prescription or get a new prescription. </li> <li>Store the medication as directed: for example, at room temperature or in the fridge. </li> <li>Place all medications in a locked box and put it in a place that is high up and out of your child's reach. Keep all medication in its original child-resistant packaging.</li> <li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child. Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. </li> </ul> <p>Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.Make sure your child always has enough medication to last through weekends, holidays and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least two days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. Also:</p> <ul> <li>keep a list of all the medications your child is taking, including prescription drugs, non-prescription drugs and herbal supplements as some of them may interact with your child’s medications. Show this list to your doctor and pharmacist.</li> <li>give doses as indicated: for example, with meals or on an empty stomach. </li> <li>shake liquid formulations well so the drug does not settle at the bottom of the bottle and result in an uneven dosing. </li> <li>if you are using a "dissolve and dose" device, carefully follow the instructions to ensure the correct concentration. </li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/medicines_how_to_use_safely.jpgSafeMedUseMedicines: How to use safely

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