About scoliosisAAbout scoliosisAbout scoliosisEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000059.0000000000000685.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page describes scoliosis and the difference between small, medium, and large scoliosis curves. It also explains the three different types of scoliosis: congenital scoliosis, neuromuscular scoliosis, and idiopathic scoliosis.</p><p> Not all scoliosis looks the same. Learn about the type of scoliosis your teen has and how it might be treated.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Teens with scoliosis have a spine that is curved sideways.</li> <li>There are three main types of scoliosis: congenital scoliosis, neuromuscular scoliosis, and idiopathic scoliosis. </li> <li> Congenital scoliosis means that the bones in your teen's spine were not shaped properly since birth. Neuromuscular scoliosis means that a muscle disease or condition has caused the spine to curve. Idiopathic scoliosis means that there is no known cause for the spine's curve. </li> <li> This website focuses on idiopathic scoliosis that requires surgery.</li></ul>
Au sujet de la scolioseAAu sujet de la scolioseAbout scoliosisFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000059.0000000000000685.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Cette page décrit ce qu’est une scoliose et la différence entre les petites, les moyennes et les grandes courbures de scoliose. Elle explique aussi les différents types de scoliose : scoliose congénitale, la scoliose neuromusculaire et la scoliose idiopathique.</p><p>Toutes les scolioses ne se ressemblent pas. Découvrez le type de scoliose dont est atteint votre adolescent et de quelle façon elle peut être traitée.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li>Les adolescents atteints de scoliose présentent une colonne vertébrale courbée.</li> <li>Il existe trois principaux types de scoliose : la scoliose congénitale, la scoliose neuromusculaire et la scoliose idiopathique. </li> <li> Une scoliose congénitale signifie que les os de la colonne vertébrale de votre adolescent n’étaient pas bien formés dès la naissance. Une scoliose neuromusculaire signifie que la courbure de la colonne vertébrale est causée par une maladie ou un trouble musculaire. Une scoliose idiopathique signifie que la colonne est courbée et qu’il n’y a aucune cause connue. </li> <li> Le présent site Web se concentre sur la scoliose idiopathique nécessitant une intervention chirurgicale.</li></ul>

 

 

About scoliosis2006.00000000000About scoliosisAbout scoliosisAEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000059.0000000000000685.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page describes scoliosis and the difference between small, medium, and large scoliosis curves. It also explains the three different types of scoliosis: congenital scoliosis, neuromuscular scoliosis, and idiopathic scoliosis.</p><p> Not all scoliosis looks the same. Learn about the type of scoliosis your teen has and how it might be treated.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li> Teens with scoliosis have a spine that is curved sideways.</li> <li>There are three main types of scoliosis: congenital scoliosis, neuromuscular scoliosis, and idiopathic scoliosis. </li> <li> Congenital scoliosis means that the bones in your teen's spine were not shaped properly since birth. Neuromuscular scoliosis means that a muscle disease or condition has caused the spine to curve. Idiopathic scoliosis means that there is no known cause for the spine's curve. </li> <li> This website focuses on idiopathic scoliosis that requires surgery.</li></ul><h2>What is scoliosis?</h2><p>If your teen has scoliosis, it means that their spine is curved sideways. This curve can lead to changes in their shoulders, ribcage, pelvis, waist, and the overall shape of their back. The sketch below shows what a spine with scoliosis looks like.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Scoliosis</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/scoliosis_03_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">With scoliosis, the spine curves to one side, usually to the right, resulting in one shoulder being higher than the other.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Your teen’s surgeon will measure the size of their curve. The curve may be small, medium, or large in size:</p><ul><li>Small curves are 20 degrees or less.</li><li>Medium curves are between 20 and 50 degrees.</li><li>Large curves are greater than 50 degrees.</li></ul><p>There are three main types of scoliosis. These are congenital scoliosis, neuromuscular scoliosis, and idiopathic scoliosis.</p><p>An X-ray can show whether the bones in your teen’s spine are mis-shaped or not. If the bones are mis-shaped, your teen has congenital scoliosis. If the bones in their spine are normally shaped, the surgeons then need to find out if there is an underlying cause for the scoliosis. If there is an underlying cause, it is probably related to a muscle disease or condition, and therefore is referred to as neuromuscular scoliosis. If there is no underlying cause for the scoliosis, it is referred to as idiopathic scoliosis. The word idiopathic means <em>of unknown cause</em>.</p><h2>Congenital scoliosis</h2><p>The word congenital means <em>present at birth</em>. If your teen has congenital scoliosis, it means that the bones in their spine were not shaped properly from birth. The mis-shaped bones in their back have caused their scoliosis. However, their actual curve may not have developed until later in childhood due to abnormal growth.</p><p>The seriousness of the curve varies from teen to teen. Your teen may have developed large curves in their spine in their early years of life. On the other hand, they may have developed just a small curve in their teenage years.</p><p>If your teen has congenital scoliosis, they might have problems in other areas of their body as well. Almost 25% of teens with congenital scoliosis have problems with their kidneys or urinary tract. Ten per cent have congenital heart disease, which is heart disease from birth.</p><p>This website will focus on idiopathic scoliosis, which is described below.</p><h2>Neuromuscular scoliosis</h2><p>If your teen has neuromuscular scoliosis, it means that their spine curve is caused by a muscle disease or condition. One condition that can cause scoliosis is muscular dystrophy, which weakens the muscles. Another is cerebral palsy, which causes constant muscle contractions.</p><p>If your teen has neuromuscular scoliosis, the curves in their spine may get bigger and lead to more problems. For example, a teen with neuromuscular scoliosis might find it hard to sit on their own. If they have a large curve and weak rib muscles, they may have problems with breathing.</p><p>Neuromuscular curves are usually diagnosed during childhood. Many of the conditions that cause neuromuscular scoliosis are genetic and involve many parts of the body. This is different from idiopathic scoliosis which only involves the spine.</p><p>This website will focus on idiopathic scoliosis, described below.</p><h2>Idiopathic scoliosis</h2><p>The word idiopathic means <em>of unknown cause.</em> If your teen has idiopathic scoliosis, it means that their spine is curved sideways and there is no known cause. Teens with idiopathic scoliosis are healthy in every other way.</p><h3>Will your teen’s curve get bigger?</h3><p>There are several factors that will affect whether your teen’s curve will progress. For example, their curve is more likely to increase if they are very young, especially if they have not yet reached puberty.</p><h3>Will your teen’s curve need treatment?</h3><p>The need for treatment depends on the type and size of their curve. In general:</p><ul><li>If your teen has a small curve of less than 20 degrees, they may only need to be observed over time.</li><li>If their curve is medium-sized, between 20 to 50 degrees, they may either be observed over time or treated with a brace.</li><li>If they have a larger curve, greater than 50 degrees, they may require surgery.</li></ul><p>This website will focus on idiopathic scoliosis. Specifically, it focuses on idiopathic scoliosis that may require surgery.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/scoliosis_03_MED_ILL_EN.jpgAbout scoliosis

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