Scoliosis and emotional issuesSScoliosis and emotional issuesScoliosis and emotional issuesEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000065.0000000000000604.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Having scoliosis can be emotionally upsetting for teenagers. Find out about some common issues they face, such as negative self image and increased stress.</p><p>While scoliosis can cause a teen stress and negatively affect their body image, there are a number of ways they can cope with feelings brought on by the diagnosis.</p><h2> Key points</h2> <ul><li> Surgery for scoliolis can prevent future problems and improve the appearance of your teen's back, rib cage, shoulders and hips. </li> <li> Scoliolsis can affect your teen's body image, but feelings of anxiety, fear, and withdrawal often improve with time.</li> <li> While some studies show that teens with scoliosis are unhappy with their appearance or feel isolated or depressed, others found that many teens were not bothered by scoliosis.</li></ul>
La scoliose et les questions d’ordre émotionnelLLa scoliose et les questions d’ordre émotionnelScoliosis and emotional issuesFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000065.0000000000000604.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Être atteint d’une scoliose peut être émotionnellement troublant pour les adolescents. Découvrez certains des enjeux auxquels ils font souvent face, comme une perception négative d’eux-mêmes et un stress accru.</p><p>Bien que la scoliose puisse entraîner du stress et affecter négativement l’image corporelle des adolescents, il existe différents moyens pour les aider à gérer leurs émotions créées par le diagnostic.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li> Une intervention chirurgicale visant à corriger une scoliose peut prévenir de futurs problèmes et améliorer l’apparence du dos, de la cage thoracique, des épaules et des hanches de votre adolescent.</li> <li> Une scoliose peut affecter l’image corporelle de votre adolescent, mais les sentiments d’anxiété, de peur et de repli sur soir s’amenuisent avec le temps.</li> <li> Bien que certaines études démontrent que des adolescents atteints de scolioses ne sont pas satisfaits de leur apparence ou se sentent isolés ou déprimés, d’autres études ont observé que plusieurs adolescents n’étaient pas perturbés par leur scoliose. </li></ul>

 

 

Scoliosis and emotional issues2010.00000000000Scoliosis and emotional issuesScoliosis and emotional issuesSEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000065.0000000000000604.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Having scoliosis can be emotionally upsetting for teenagers. Find out about some common issues they face, such as negative self image and increased stress.</p><p>While scoliosis can cause a teen stress and negatively affect their body image, there are a number of ways they can cope with feelings brought on by the diagnosis.</p><h2> Key points</h2> <ul><li> Surgery for scoliolis can prevent future problems and improve the appearance of your teen's back, rib cage, shoulders and hips. </li> <li> Scoliolsis can affect your teen's body image, but feelings of anxiety, fear, and withdrawal often improve with time.</li> <li> While some studies show that teens with scoliosis are unhappy with their appearance or feel isolated or depressed, others found that many teens were not bothered by scoliosis.</li></ul><figure> </figure> <h2>Body image</h2> <p>Scoliosis can affect the shape of your teen’s back, rib cage, shoulders, and hips. Sometimes these changes can affect how they feel about themselves. This is called body image. </p> <p>Body image doesn’t always relate to the size of the curve. Your teen may have a relatively small curve and have problems with their body image. They might refuse to wear bathing suits, tank tops, or tight fitting clothing. On the other hand, your teen may have a large curve and major changes to their body shape, without having problems with their body image. </p> <p>The two main reasons your teen might have surgery for scoliosis are to prevent future problems and to improve the appearance of their back, rib cage, shoulders, and hips. It is very important that your teen lets their surgeon know their feelings about how their body looks. They also need to talk with the surgeon about how much surgery can improve the appearance of their back, rib cage, shoulders, and hips. </p> <p>Many studies have found that teenagers with scoliosis are not happy with their appearance. They often fear that their bodies are developing abnormally. Boys with scoliosis tend to view themselves in poorer health when compared to their peers. A diagnosis of scoliosis in a girl who already struggles with poor body image can cause her more stress. </p> <p>Exercising regularly can help your teen feel better about their body. Being in contact with other teens facing the same issues can really help. Talking about the challenges of clothing, sports, and dating can help your teen cope better. Talking with peers can also help them feel less isolated. </p> <h2>Other emotional issues</h2> <p>Being diagnosed with scoliosis can cause your teen a lot of stress. When they were first diagnosed, they may have felt anxiety, fear, and withdrawal. These feelings tend to improve with time depending on treatment. </p> <p>If your teen has to wear a brace before surgery, they may face a few issues:</p> <ul> <li>feeling different from their friends at a sensitive age</li> <li>trying to wear clothing that hides the brace</li> <li>deciding whether to wear the brace with certain social activities</li> <li>teasing from other teens at school</li> <li>nagging from parents to wear the brace</li> </ul> <p>If your teen needs to be treated with surgery, they may have other concerns:</p> <ul> <li>fear of the surgery itself and all its risks</li> <li>worry about missing school and losing social status</li> <li>anxiety about whether their friends will stick around</li> <li>concern about how they will look after the surgery</li> </ul> <p>Regardless of treatment, if your teen does not understand or is unwilling to accept the risks and benefits of treatment, they may have more trouble coping. Other things that can cause them to have difficulty coping include: </p> <ul> <li>denial: refusing to accept the diagnosis of scoliosis and its treatment</li> <li>ongoing family problems</li> <li>previous coping problems in other situations</li> <li>potential for acting out: using anti-social behaviour to deal with emotional conflict</li> <li>dependence on others for emotional fulfillment</li> <li>prolonged treatment</li> </ul> <p>Scoliosis can put your teen at risk for alcohol or drug use, suicidal thoughts, and other issues. It seems that teens who receive scoliosis treatment after age 16 years have more emotional problems than those treated at a younger age. </p> <p>Not all teens with scoliosis react in a negative way. In one study, 25% to 43% of teens with scoliosis who received a brace or surgery felt isolated or depressed. They spent less time enjoying recreational activities and dating. But the same study found that 40% of teens were not bothered by their scoliosis. Half of the teens who had surgery said they felt more independent and mature.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/scoliosis_and_emotional_issues.jpgScoliosis and emotional issues

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.