X-rays for scoliosisXX-rays for scoliosisX-rays for scoliosisEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000076.0000000000000298.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>X-ray images are the most common tool used to assess scoliosis. Find out how X-rays provide images for tracking the growth and development of scoliosis.</p><p>An X-ray is a type of radiation that passes through the body. It gives the surgeon information on the size, shape, and location of the bones in the spinal column. It is also called radiography.</p> <p>By far, X-rays are the most common diagnostic tool in scoliosis. It tells the surgeon many things, most importantly, the size of your teenager’s curve.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>An X-ray gives the surgeon information on the size, shape, and location of the bones in the spinal column. It is the most common diagnostic tool in scoliosis. </li> <li> Beams of X-rays will pass through your teen's spine to make a picture on the film. There is very little radiation released and the radiation technologist will provide shielding as needed. </li> <li> Your teen may need to get a three-foot spinal posterior-anterior X-ray, a three-foot lateral spinal X-ray, spinal bending films, bone age X-ray, or pelvis X-ray.</li></ul>
Radiographie pour évaluer la scolioseRRadiographie pour évaluer la scolioseX-rays for scoliosisFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000076.0000000000000298.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Les radiographies sont de loin l’outil diagnostique le plus fréquemment utilisé pour évaluer la scoliose. Découvrez comment les radiographies fournissent des images permettant de suivre la croissance et le développement de la scoliose.</p><p>Un rayon X est un type de radiation qui passe à travers le corps. Il donne au chirurgien des renseignements sur la taille, la forme et l’emplacement des os de la colonne vertébrale. On l’appelle aussi radiographie. Les radiographies sont de loin l’outil diagnostique le plus fréquemment utilisé pour la scoliose. Elle en dit beaucoup au chirurgien, dont la plus importante, l’ampleur de la courbure de votre adolescent.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li>Radiographie pour la scoliose : une radiographie donne au chirurgien des renseignements sur la taille, la forme et l’emplacement des os de la colonne vertébrale. Elle est de loin l’outil diagnostique le plus fréquemment utilisé pour la scoliose.</li> <li>Un faisceau de rayons X traversera la colonne de votre adolescent pour que l’image soit imprimée sur le film. Très peu de radiations sont émises et le technologue en radiologie fournira un écran protecteur au besoin.</li> <li>Votre adolescent pourrait avoir besoin d’une radiographie spinale postérieure antérieure à trois pieds, radiographie latérale à trois pieds, une image en flexion, une radiographie pour déterminer l’âge des os ou une radiographie pelvienne. </li></ul>

 

 

X-rays for scoliosis2015.00000000000X-rays for scoliosisX-rays for scoliosisXEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000076.0000000000000298.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>X-ray images are the most common tool used to assess scoliosis. Find out how X-rays provide images for tracking the growth and development of scoliosis.</p><p>An X-ray is a type of radiation that passes through the body. It gives the surgeon information on the size, shape, and location of the bones in the spinal column. It is also called radiography.</p> <p>By far, X-rays are the most common diagnostic tool in scoliosis. It tells the surgeon many things, most importantly, the size of your teenager’s curve.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>An X-ray gives the surgeon information on the size, shape, and location of the bones in the spinal column. It is the most common diagnostic tool in scoliosis. </li> <li> Beams of X-rays will pass through your teen's spine to make a picture on the film. There is very little radiation released and the radiation technologist will provide shielding as needed. </li> <li> Your teen may need to get a three-foot spinal posterior-anterior X-ray, a three-foot lateral spinal X-ray, spinal bending films, bone age X-ray, or pelvis X-ray.</li></ul><figure> <img alt="X-ray image of spine with scoliosis" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Scoliosis_XrayDiagnosis_EN.jpg" /> </figure> <p>Your teen, wearing a hospital gown, will be asked to stand next to the X-ray film. They will be asked to hold still for two or three seconds, so the picture doesn’t blur. The X-ray machine will be turned on for a fraction of a second. Beams of X-rays will pass through your teenager’s spine to make a picture on the film. The X-ray film, like regular camera film, is developed in about 10 minutes. In some hospitals, X-rays are completely digitized and your teen’s surgeon will view them directly on a computer.</p><p>Your teen won’t feel a thing. There is very little radiation released through the X-ray. To make it even more safe, the radiation technologist will provide shielding as needed. The type of shielding required depends on the type of X-ray being done. For example, because your teen is having spine X-rays, they will be given breast shields.</p><p>There are several types of X-rays that may be done on your teenager:</p><ul><li>Three-foot spinal posterior-anterior X-ray: This is an X-ray of your teen’s spine that is shot back to front.</li><li>Three-foot lateral spinal X-ray: This is an X-ray of your teen’s spine that is shot from the side.</li><li>Spinal bending films: These are X-rays of your teen’s spine to test its flexibility.</li><li>Bone age X-ray: This is an X-ray of your teen’s left hand to assess whether they are still growing.</li><li>Pelvis X-ray: This is an X-ray of your teen’s pelvis to assess whether their bones are still growing. X-rays of the the elbow may also be done to assess bone maturity.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Scoliosis_XrayDiagnosis_EN.jpgX-rays for scoliosis

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