Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for scoliosisMMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for scoliosisMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for scoliosisEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000073.0000000000000488.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An MRI may be used to assess spines with scoliosis. Find out more about MRI procedures as well as when and why they are used.</p><p>Magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI) is a technique that can show details of the bones of your teen’s spinal column. It shows structural abnormalities of the spine.</p><h2> Key points </h2><ul><li> Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show details of the bones of your teen's spinal column, including structural abnormalities of the spine.</li><li> Your surgeon may order an MRI of your teen's spin if their curve is rapidly increasing, if they are under 10 years old, they have an unusual curve, or if they have neurological problems.<br></li><li> The MRI machine scans your teen's spine to produce cross-sectional images, which are interpreted by a radiologist. </li><li>An MRI does not use radiation or X-rays: a powerful magnet, radio signals and computer create the images. </li><li>The entire MRI study lasts about one hour. Each scan takes from one to five minutes, during which time your teen must stay still.</li></ul>
Imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) Radiographie pour évaluer la scolioseIImagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) Radiographie pour évaluer la scolioseMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for scoliosisFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000073.0000000000000488.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>L’imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) peut être employée afin d’évaluer les colonnes vertébrales atteintes de scoliose. Découvrez les procédures d’imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) ainsi que pourquoi et quand sont-elles utilisées.</p><p>L’imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) est une technique qui peut montrer les détails des os de la colonne vertébrale de votre adolescent. Elle met en évidence les anomalies structurelles de la colonne vertébrale.</p><h2>À retenir </h2><ul><li>L’imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) est une technique qui peut montrer les détails des os de la colonne vertébrale de votre adolescent, dont des anomalies structurelles.</li><li>Votre chirurgien peut demander une IRM de la colonne vertébrale de votre adolescent si sa courbure augmente rapidement, si votre enfant est âgé de moins de dix ans, s’il présente une courbure inhabituelle ou si votre enfant a des problèmes neurologiques.</li><li>L’appareil d’IRM examine la colonne vertébrale de votre adolescent afin de produire des images de coupes transversales qui sont interprétées par un radiologue.</li><li>Un appareil d’IRM n’utilise pas de radiation ni de rayons X : les images sont produites à l’aide d’un aimant puissant, de signaux radio et d’un ordinateur.</li><li>L’examen d’IRM complet prend environ une heure. Chaque numérisation peut durer d’une à cinq minutes, au cours de laquelle la personne doit rester immobile.</li></ul>

 

 

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for scoliosis2017.00000000000Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for scoliosisMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for scoliosisMEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000073.0000000000000488.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An MRI may be used to assess spines with scoliosis. Find out more about MRI procedures as well as when and why they are used.</p><p>Magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI) is a technique that can show details of the bones of your teen’s spinal column. It shows structural abnormalities of the spine.</p><h2> Key points </h2><ul><li> Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show details of the bones of your teen's spinal column, including structural abnormalities of the spine.</li><li> Your surgeon may order an MRI of your teen's spin if their curve is rapidly increasing, if they are under 10 years old, they have an unusual curve, or if they have neurological problems.<br></li><li> The MRI machine scans your teen's spine to produce cross-sectional images, which are interpreted by a radiologist. </li><li>An MRI does not use radiation or X-rays: a powerful magnet, radio signals and computer create the images. </li><li>The entire MRI study lasts about one hour. Each scan takes from one to five minutes, during which time your teen must stay still.</li></ul><h2>When is an MRI required?</h2> <p>Your surgeon may order an MRI of your teen’s spine for a variety of reasons:</p> <ul> <li>If their curve is rapidly getting bigger</li> <li>If they are young: under 10 years of age</li> <li>If they have an unusual curve pattern</li> <li>If they have neurological problems such as a lack of reflexes, numbness, or weakness</li> </ul> <h2>What happens before an MRI?</h2> <p>Before the MRI, your teen will be asked to fill out a standard screening form to check for various types of metal in their body. All metal objects, like earrings, necklaces, or piercings, should be removed. Your teen may need to put on a hospital gown before the procedure.</p> <h2>What happens during the MRI?</h2> <p>The MRI machine will scan your teen’s spine in "slices” to produce cross-sectional images. Each image shows a different slice or level of the spine. These images or scans are interpreted by a radiologist. </p> <p>MRI does not use radiation or X-rays. Instead, a powerful magnet, radio signals, and a computer are used to create the pictures. An MRI scan is fairly noisy but doesn’t hurt. </p> <p>An MRI is generally a non-invasive procedure, unless a special dye called contrast fluid is used. If contrast fluid is needed, a nurse will insert a small IV tube (needle) into your teen’s arm before beginning the MRI. This will feel like getting a blood test or an injection. The small tube will be left in your teenager’s arm. During the MRI, the contrast dye will be injected through the tube.</p> <h2>Who performs an MRI?</h2> <p>Several people may be involved in the procedure: a technologist, a nurse, a radiologist, and if necessary, an anaesthetist. </p> <h2>How long does an MRI take?</h2> <p>A full MRI study is made up of a series of short scans. The entire MRI study lasts about one hour. Each scan takes from one to five minutes, during which time your teen must stay still. </p> <h2>Does an MRI require sedation?</h2> <p>If your teen is able to lie perfectly still for an hour, then no special preparation is usually needed for the scans. However, some teens may need medicine to help them sleep, so they can lie still for the scans. </p> <p>The type of sedation your teen needs depends on their age and medical condition. They may only need a sedative by mouth or they may need to receive sedation through a needle. On the other hand, they may need a general anaesthetic, in which case they would most likely receive it through a needle. </p> <p>Before having any sedation or general anaesthetic, your teen will have to be careful about what they eat or drinks. The treatment team will tell your teen when they need to stop eating and drinking before the MRI. </p>Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for scoliosis

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