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Scoliosis: Looking aheadSScoliosis: Looking aheadScoliosis: Looking aheadEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000061.0000000000000230.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page gives a few statistics on how many teens may need additional surgery in the future. It describes why additional surgery may be required. It gives an idea of what to expect in terms of medical follow-up as the teen gets older.</p><p> If your teen has had scoliosis surgery, it is possible they will need more surgery in the future or need to continue seeing an adult spine surgeon.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>While it is not common, teens who have had scoliosis surgery may need more surgery for reasons including infection, painful or prominent rods, or their spine not fusing properly.</li> <li>Your teen's paediatric spine surgeon will advise as to whether they need to see an adult spine surgeon after they turn 18.</li></ul>
La scoliose : Regard vers l’avenirLLa scoliose : Regard vers l’avenirScoliosis: Looking aheadFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000061.0000000000000230.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>La présente page fournit quelques statistiques concernant le nombre d’adolescents ayant besoin d’interventions chirurgicales additionnelles à l’avenir. Elle décrit la raison pour laquelle des interventions chirurgicales pourraient être requises et elle donne une idée de ce à quoi s’attendre en termes de suivi médical à mesure que l’adolescent vieillit.</p><p>Si votre adolescent a subi une intervention chirurgicale associée à une scoliose, il est possible qu’il doive subir d’autres interventions à l’avenir ou qu’il ait besoin de poursuivre ses consultations auprès d’un chirurgie de la colonne pour adulte.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li> Bien que cela soit peu fréquent, les adolescents qui ont subi une intervention chirurgicale auront peut-être besoin besoin d’autres interventions pour différentes raisons dont une infection, des tiges proéminentes ou douloureuses ou la colonne qui ne guérit pas adéquatement.</li> <li>Une fois que votre adolescent aura atteint l’âge de 18 ans, le chirurgien pédiatre de votre enfant vous fera savoir s’il fait effectuer le transfert de son cas à un chirurgien pour adultes. </li></ul>

 

 

Scoliosis: Looking ahead2043.00000000000Scoliosis: Looking aheadScoliosis: Looking aheadSEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Reinhard Zeller, MD, ScD, FRCSC8.0000000000000061.0000000000000230.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page gives a few statistics on how many teens may need additional surgery in the future. It describes why additional surgery may be required. It gives an idea of what to expect in terms of medical follow-up as the teen gets older.</p><p> If your teen has had scoliosis surgery, it is possible they will need more surgery in the future or need to continue seeing an adult spine surgeon.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>While it is not common, teens who have had scoliosis surgery may need more surgery for reasons including infection, painful or prominent rods, or their spine not fusing properly.</li> <li>Your teen's paediatric spine surgeon will advise as to whether they need to see an adult spine surgeon after they turn 18.</li></ul><h2>Will your teen need more surgery?</h2><p>It is hard to predict whether your teen will need additional surgery. However, about 2% to 19% of teens who have scoliosis surgery need more surgery at a later date. </p><p>One study followed over 1000 teens who had scoliosis surgery for 15 years. This is an older study using older surgical techniques. Numbers are not known yet for newer surgical techniques. The results showed: </p><ul><li>Approximately 13% required more surgery.</li><li>Of the teens who needed more surgery, 21% required two or more additional surgeries.</li><li>The average time between the first surgery and repeat surgeries was two years.</li></ul><p>The most common reasons for additional surgery were:</p><ul><li>Infection: 26% of repeat surgeries</li><li>Painful or prominent rods: 22%</li><li>Spine not fusing properly, which is a condition called pseudoarthrosis: 17%</li></ul><h2>What happens when your teen becomes an adult?</h2><p>Once your teen turns 18, they may need to transition to the care of an adult spine surgeon. Your teen’s paediatric spine surgeon will let them know if they need to do this. Some paediatric spine surgeons want all of their patients to follow-up with an adult spine surgeon within two years of being discharged from the paediatric hospital. Other paediatric spine surgeons don’t think a visit is required unless there is a problem such as ongoing or increased pain. </p><p>Check with your teen’s surgeon to see what they prefer. It is probably a good idea to get the name of an adult spine surgeon in case problems come up in the future.</p>Scoliosis: Looking ahead

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