Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before epilepsy surgeryMMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before epilepsy surgeryMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before epilepsy surgeryEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-10-10T04:00:00Z​​Elysa Widjaja, MD, MPH ​000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Discover how an MRI helps identify the parts of the brain where epilepsy starts.</p><p>A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses a strong magnet to take pictures of your child’s brain.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>An MRI scan uses a strong magnet to take pictures of your child's brain.</li> <li>Before the scan, tell the team about any metal implants or piercings in your child to reduce any harm from the magnet in the MRI scanner.</li> <li>During the scan, your child will need to lie still in the MRI machine for about an hour. Some children may need a sedative to help them with this.</li> <li>You may discuss the results of the MRI scan with your child's doctor about four to six weeks after the test.</li></ul><p>The MRI scanner is a large, round, noisy machine with a tunnel in the centre. During the scan, your child wears a special helmet and lies on a narrow bed that slides into the MRI machine. The scan does not hurt.</p> <figure class="asset-right"> <p>Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan<br></p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets//MRI_scanner_with_child.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>The MRI scan takes about one hour. However, if your child needs a sedative for the scan (see below), please allow up to three to four hours for your hospital visit. This allows enough time for the scan and for any medicine to wear off before your child goes home.</p><h2>Why does my child need an MRI scan?</h2><p>The MRI takes picture of your child’s brain. Doctors are trained to look at these pictures to identify what is the cause of the epilepsy.</p><h2>What happens when my child arrives for the scan?</h2><ol><li>An MRI team member will check if your child can lie still comfortably in the MRI machine.</li><li>Your child will empty their clothes pockets and remove any watches, purses, jewellery and makeup. They can store these in a locker during the scan.</li><li>Your child will change into a hospital gown and enter the MRI room.</li></ol><h2>What happens during an MRI scan?</h2><p>The technologist will place your child’s head in a head coil, which is like a helmet. Your child will also wear earplugs or headphones to help reduce the loud knocking noise from the MRI machine.</p> <figure class="asset-right"> <p>MRI scan of the brain</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/MRI_brain_coronal_scan.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Sometimes, doctors may need to give your child a special liquid called contrast to help the MRI images show more information about the brain. This liquid is put into the vein in your child’s hand or arm through an <a>intravenous catheter</a>.</p><p>When your child is ready, they will then lie on the narrow bed that moves into the tunnel. The MRI technologist will talk to them through a speaker from outside the MRI room and remind them to stay still during the whole scan.</p><p>If your child is able to stay still without taking any medicine, they may watch a movie to pass the time.</p><h2>May I stay with my child during the MRI scan?</h2><p>You may stay in the MRI room with your child if:</p><ul><li>your child is not asleep during the study</li><li>the technologist is sure that it is safe for you to do so, for example by asking about any metal implants or piercings.</li></ul><h2>What should I expect after an MRI?</h2> <p>Once the scan is done, your child may get dressed and go home. If your child took any sedative (medicine to help them stay calm) during the MRI, they may leave the hospital only when they are alert and fully recovered.</p><h2>How do I prepare my child for an MRI scan?</h2> <ul><li>Explain what will happen during the MRI in words your child understands.</li> <li>Before the scan, tell the MRI team about any metal implants inside your child, such as metal rods, screws, braces or clips, and if your child has any body piercings. It is important to share this information to minimize the risk of harm from the strong magnet in the MRI scanner.</li></ul> <h2>Will my child need to be sedated for an MRI scan?</h2> <p>Some children may need a sedative (medicine to keep them calm) to help them lie still for about an hour during the scan.</p><p>If your doctor has told you that your child needs a sedative for the MRI, someone from the MRI department will contact you with instructions on when your child needs to stop eating and drinking before their appointment.</p> <p>If the MRI is booked without a sedative but you think your child needs it, please contact the MRI department at 416-813-5774 and choose option 3.</p>

 

 

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before epilepsy surgery2049.00000000000Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before epilepsy surgeryMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before epilepsy surgeryMEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-10-10T04:00:00Z​​Elysa Widjaja, MD, MPH ​000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Discover how an MRI helps identify the parts of the brain where epilepsy starts.</p><p>A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses a strong magnet to take pictures of your child’s brain.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>An MRI scan uses a strong magnet to take pictures of your child's brain.</li> <li>Before the scan, tell the team about any metal implants or piercings in your child to reduce any harm from the magnet in the MRI scanner.</li> <li>During the scan, your child will need to lie still in the MRI machine for about an hour. Some children may need a sedative to help them with this.</li> <li>You may discuss the results of the MRI scan with your child's doctor about four to six weeks after the test.</li></ul><h2>When will I get the test results?</h2> <p>Your doctor will receive the report of the MRI scan results and discuss them with you and your child at a follow-up appointment, usually about four to six weeks after the scan.</p><p>The MRI scanner is a large, round, noisy machine with a tunnel in the centre. During the scan, your child wears a special helmet and lies on a narrow bed that slides into the MRI machine. The scan does not hurt.</p> <figure class="asset-right"> <p>Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan<br></p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets//MRI_scanner_with_child.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>The MRI scan takes about one hour. However, if your child needs a sedative for the scan (see below), please allow up to three to four hours for your hospital visit. This allows enough time for the scan and for any medicine to wear off before your child goes home.</p><h2>Why does my child need an MRI scan?</h2><p>The MRI takes picture of your child’s brain. Doctors are trained to look at these pictures to identify what is the cause of the epilepsy.</p><h2>What happens when my child arrives for the scan?</h2><ol><li>An MRI team member will check if your child can lie still comfortably in the MRI machine.</li><li>Your child will empty their clothes pockets and remove any watches, purses, jewellery and makeup. They can store these in a locker during the scan.</li><li>Your child will change into a hospital gown and enter the MRI room.</li></ol><h2>What happens during an MRI scan?</h2><p>The technologist will place your child’s head in a head coil, which is like a helmet. Your child will also wear earplugs or headphones to help reduce the loud knocking noise from the MRI machine.</p> <figure class="asset-right"> <p>MRI scan of the brain</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/MRI_brain_coronal_scan.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Sometimes, doctors may need to give your child a special liquid called contrast to help the MRI images show more information about the brain. This liquid is put into the vein in your child’s hand or arm through an <a>intravenous catheter</a>.</p><p>When your child is ready, they will then lie on the narrow bed that moves into the tunnel. The MRI technologist will talk to them through a speaker from outside the MRI room and remind them to stay still during the whole scan.</p><p>If your child is able to stay still without taking any medicine, they may watch a movie to pass the time.</p><h2>May I stay with my child during the MRI scan?</h2><p>You may stay in the MRI room with your child if:</p><ul><li>your child is not asleep during the study</li><li>the technologist is sure that it is safe for you to do so, for example by asking about any metal implants or piercings.</li></ul><h2>What should I expect after an MRI?</h2> <p>Once the scan is done, your child may get dressed and go home. If your child took any sedative (medicine to help them stay calm) during the MRI, they may leave the hospital only when they are alert and fully recovered.</p><h2>How do I prepare my child for an MRI scan?</h2> <ul><li>Explain what will happen during the MRI in words your child understands.</li> <li>Before the scan, tell the MRI team about any metal implants inside your child, such as metal rods, screws, braces or clips, and if your child has any body piercings. It is important to share this information to minimize the risk of harm from the strong magnet in the MRI scanner.</li></ul> <h2>Will my child need to be sedated for an MRI scan?</h2> <p>Some children may need a sedative (medicine to keep them calm) to help them lie still for about an hour during the scan.</p><h2>Does the scan have any risks or side effects?</h2> <p>If your child receives contrast, it may cause a rash or puffiness around the face and neck. This is very rare, however. The MRI team will watch your child very closely during and after the MRI to check for any reaction to the contrast and help ease any symptoms.​</p><p>If your doctor has told you that your child needs a sedative for the MRI, someone from the MRI department will contact you with instructions on when your child needs to stop eating and drinking before their appointment.</p> <p>If the MRI is booked without a sedative but you think your child needs it, please contact the MRI department at 416-813-5774 and choose option 3.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets//MRI_scanner_with_child.jpgMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before epilepsy surgeryhttps://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=2050&language=Englishhttps://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=2048&language=English

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