Looking after yourself when a child has epilepsyLLooking after yourself when a child has epilepsyLooking after yourself when a child has epilepsyEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2010-02-04T05:00:00ZIrene Elliott, RN, MHSc, ACNP;Janice Mulligan, MSW, RSW12.000000000000046.00000000000001304.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Parents of children with epilepsy need to take care of themselves too. A new reality must be accepted. Here are some self-care suggestions for parents.</p><p>Epilepsy is one of the most complicated chronic health conditions. In addition to the impact of your child’s seizures on the family, concerns arise about the possible negative effects of epilepsy and anti-epileptic medications on the child’s learning and emotional well-being.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Signs of too much stress include extreme sadness, anger, eating problems, confusion, anxiety, physical pain, and feeling overwhelmed.</li> <li>To relieve stress, try talking to others, sharing responsibility, attending support group meetings, maintaining good physical health and taking time for yourself.</li> <li>Communicating and spending time each day with your spouse or partner can help ease stress and will help maintain a strong relationship.</li></ul>
Prendre soin de vous quand un enfant est atteint d'épilepsiePPrendre soin de vous quand un enfant est atteint d'épilepsieLooking after yourself when a child has epilepsyFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2010-02-04T05:00:00ZIrene Elliott, RN, MHSc, ACNP;Janice Mulligan, MSW, RSW12.000000000000046.00000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Les parents d’enfants épileptiques ont besoin de prendre soin d’eux aussi. Une nouvelle réalité doit être acceptée. Voici comment les parents peuvent prendre soin d’eux-mêmes.</p><p>L’épilepsie est l’un des problèmes de santé chroniques les plus complexes. En plus de l’incidence des crises de votre enfant sur la famille, vous pourriez être préoccupés par les effets potentiellement néfastes de la maladie et des médicaments antiépileptiques sur son apprentissage et son bien-être affectif.</p><ul><li>Les signes d’un stress trop important sont une tristesse extrême, de la colère, des problèmes alimentaires, de la confusion, de l’anxiété, des douleurs physiques et le fait de se sentir dépassé.</li> <li>Pour évacuer ce stress, essayez de vous ouvrir aux autres, de partager les responsabilités, de participer à des groupes d’entraide, de maintenir une bonne santé physique et de prendre du temps pour vous.</li> <li>Communiquer et passer du temps chaque jour avec votre conjoint peut aider à soulager votre stress et vous aidera à maintenir une relation solide.</li></ul>

 

 

Looking after yourself when a child has epilepsy2108.00000000000Looking after yourself when a child has epilepsyLooking after yourself when a child has epilepsyLEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2010-02-04T05:00:00ZIrene Elliott, RN, MHSc, ACNP;Janice Mulligan, MSW, RSW12.000000000000046.00000000000001304.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Parents of children with epilepsy need to take care of themselves too. A new reality must be accepted. Here are some self-care suggestions for parents.</p><p>Epilepsy is one of the most complicated chronic health conditions. In addition to the impact of your child’s seizures on the family, concerns arise about the possible negative effects of epilepsy and anti-epileptic medications on the child’s learning and emotional well-being.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Signs of too much stress include extreme sadness, anger, eating problems, confusion, anxiety, physical pain, and feeling overwhelmed.</li> <li>To relieve stress, try talking to others, sharing responsibility, attending support group meetings, maintaining good physical health and taking time for yourself.</li> <li>Communicating and spending time each day with your spouse or partner can help ease stress and will help maintain a strong relationship.</li></ul><p>Some feelings and concerns you may experience include: </p> <ul> <li>struggles with emotions about why this has happened, including anger, sadness, or guilt. Mothers often talk about feeling guilty and wondering whether something they did or did not do during their pregnancy contributed to their child’s epilepsy. </li> <li>feeling a loss of control because you cannot help your child by stopping the seizures </li> <li>wondering whether you are doing enough to help your child by finding a treatment to stop their seizures </li> <li>worry about having to hand over care of your child to other people who may not have the same knowledge about seizures and epilepsy </li> <li>worry about whether your health care team is offering the best care for your child and stress over making the best medical decisions for your child </li> <li>physical and mental exhaustion </li> <li>worry about how to support your child’s emotional well-being and social life </li> <li>marital or relationship stress because epilepsy affects the entire family </li> <li>fear about what to do in an emergency situation, should the child have a prolonged seizure </li> <li>worry about who to contact and how to contact an epilepsy team member about ongoing questions related to your child’s epilepsy </li> <li>concerns about how to parent your child with epilepsy and how it is different from parenting other children </li> <li>wondering what you should tell friends and family </li> <li>wondering how best to meet the needs of other family members while attending to your child with epilepsy </li> <li>trying to define a "new normal" for your family</li> <li>worry about the impact of epilepsy on your child’s future </li> </ul> <p>Coping with a stressful chronic health situation such as epilepsy may involve several things:</p> <ul> <li>adjusting to a new reality that has been thrust upon you </li> <li>understanding and adjusting to any new limitations </li> <li>talking to people who are supportive, including family, friends, the epilepsy care team, and support groups (parents who have gone through the same experience) </li> <li>educating yourself about epilepsy and the care your child requires, both by consulting resources such as this website and by talking with the epilepsy team </li> <li>building a solid relationship with members of your epilepsy care team that enables you to feel comfortable asking any questions and to trust that the team has your child’s best interests in mind </li> <li>informing others (family, friends, caregivers, school) about your child’s situation so that they are also able to assist you in caring properly for your child </li> <li>putting systems into place at home, at school, and other places to make it easier to care for your child and manage this new situation </li> <li>finding ways to relieve the stress that naturally occurs when adjusting to any new situation </li> </ul> <h2>Signs of too much stress</h2> <p>Adjusting to any new situation can be stressful. As a parent, you may become so busy caring for your child with epilepsy and the rest of your family that you forget about your own basic needs. The initial diagnosis and periods when your child’s seizures are not well controlled can be particularly stressful. Persistent physical stress (lack of sleep, poor eating habits) and mental stress (heightened worry and monitoring) can make you more vulnerable to illness. Your own mental and physical well-being is important, both for you and so that you can positively parent your child with epilepsy and your other children. </p> <p>If you experience any of the following feelings for more than a few weeks, it may be a "sign" that your own needs may require more attention: </p> <ul> <li>extreme sadness</li> <li>anger</li> <li>eating problems</li> <li>confusion</li> <li>anxiety</li> <li>physical pain</li> <li>feeling overwhelmed</li> </ul> <p>Contact your family doctor for help with these feelings. You may also be able to use some of the approaches listed below to help you relieve stress. </p> <h2>Stress relief approaches</h2> <p>Here are some approaches that might help you to manage your stress.</p> <h3>Talk to others</h3> <p>Talking to someone you trust and rely on is one of the best ways to deal with your feelings. This can be a family member, friend, support group, social worker, or other helping professional.</p> <h3>Share the responsibilities</h3> <p>Whenever possible, it is helpful if both parents are involved with epilepsy care routines. Feelings of resentment, fatigue, and stress can build up if one parent has to do all the planning and work. Working together can help to prevent "burnout" by sharing the load. Giving each other time away from care duties can provide much needed breaks. It can also help to plan time together, apart from your child or children, just as you did before. </p> <p>In single-parent families it can be helpful to try and arrange for another family member or a close friend to help with your child’s care from time to time. Maybe they can provide relief by babysitting. Ensure that babysitters and other caregivers know that your child has epilepsy and, in particular, what to do in case of a seizure. </p> <h3>Use respite workers</h3> <p>Respite care can provide temporary relief from the physical and emotional demands involved in caring for a child with epilepsy. Respite services provide parents and caregivers time for themselves while providing their children with opportunities to meet with other children or become involved in the community.</p> <p>For more information, please see the "<a href="/Article?contentid=2123&language=English">Resources and Support</a>" page.</p> <h3>Attend support group meetings</h3> <p>For some people a support group is a good place to express feelings, frustrations, and worries, and a good opportunity to learn how other parents of children with epilepsy manage some of their more difficult situations. Information about support groups for parents, children, or their siblings can be accessed through your "local" epilepsy chapter. If you are more comfortable speaking to someone one-on-one, you may be able to find another parent through a local epilepsy organization or the treatment team. There are also many chat rooms, discussion forums, and mailing lists on the Internet. </p> <h3>Maintain good physical health</h3> <p>Healthy eating, sufficient sleep, regular exercise, and opportunities to engage in activities that help you relax are important factors in maintaining your good health.</p> <h3>Relax and take time for yourself</h3> <p>As difficult as it may seem, try to make some time for yourself and your spouse or partner each week to reduce your stress. Sometimes epilepsy may seem to take up every minute of every day. You might feel as if you have no time for the things you have always loved to do: read a book, take a walk, or go to a movie. Taking this time can really help to refresh yourself so that you can continue caring for your child to the best of your ability.</p> <p>You might have some favourite stress relief practices already. You may also wish to try one of the following:</p> <ul> <li>massage therapy</li> <li>walking, yoga, or other exercise</li> <li>prayer or meditation</li> <li>warm baths</li> <li>music</li> <li>humour</li> <li>watching movies or television</li> <li>pursuing a favourite hobby</li> </ul> <h3>See a counsellor (family or individual)</h3> <p>Sometimes the stress of a child’s seizures feels so overwhelming that the coping strategies that have worked for you in the past, during difficult times, are no longer working. If this is the case it may be helpful to speak to a counsellor such as a social worker, psychologist, or psychiatrist. You may wish to do this on an individual or family basis. Speaking to a counsellor may offer you and your family an opportunity to talk about your situation with a neutral third party and work toward identifying strategies and finding solutions to some of your difficulties. Children’s hospitals and epilepsy clinics usually have a social worker on staff to assist families in dealing with the impact of epilepsy in their lives.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/looking_after_yourself_when_a_child_has_epilepsy.jpgLooking after yourself when a child has epilepsy

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