Epilepsy and learningEEpilepsy and learningEpilepsy and learningEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2010-02-04T05:00:00ZIrene Elliott, RN, MHSc, ACNP;Janice Mulligan, MSW, RSW038.0000000000000805.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>How to help a child with epilepsy deal with learning problems, specifically in areas of attention and concentration, memory, and language difficulties.</p><p>A number of cognitive problems have been identified in children with epilepsy. Although most children with epilepsy have normal intelligence, the distribution of IQ scores leans toward lower values. Even children with normal intelligence may have problems with specific aspects of learning, particularly in the areas of attention and concentration, memory, and academic achievement. In addition, some children with epilepsy have language difficulties, which can also result in learning problems. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Approximately half of children with epilepsy have some type of learning problem such as inattentiveness, short-term memory deficits, or slower speed of processing. Problems with language and communication may also occur.</li> <li>In children with epilepsy, the risk of having ADHD is 24%, compared to 5% in the general population.</li> <li>Early intervention is important to help children with epilepsy and learning difficulties. A psychoeducational assessment or neuropsychological testing can help identify problem areas, areas or strength, and help to inform recommendations for your child's learning.</li></ul>
L’épilepsie et l’apprentissageLL’épilepsie et l’apprentissageEpilepsy and learningFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2010-02-04T05:00:00ZIrene Elliott, RN, MHSc, ACNP;Janice Mulligan, MSW, RSW12.000000000000038.00000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Comment aider un enfant épileptique à composer avec des problèmes d’apprentissage, en particulier en ce qui concerne l’attention et la concentration, la mémoire et les difficultés de langage.</p><p>Un certain nombre de problèmes cognitifs ont été observés chez les enfants épileptiques. Bien que la plupart ont une intelligence normale, la distribution des niveaux de quotient intellectuel (QI) penche vers des valeurs inférieures. Même les enfants qui ont un QI normal peuvent avoir des problèmes avec certains aspects de l’apprentissage, en particulier en ce qui concerne l’attention et la concentration, la mémoire et le rendement scolaire. De plus, certains enfants atteints d’épilepsie ont des difficultés de langage, ce qui peut également entraîner des problèmes d’apprentissage.</p><ul><li>Environ la moitié des enfants atteints d’épilepsie ont un problème d’apprentissage comme l’inattention, des troubles de la mémoire à court terme ou un rythme plus lent pour traiter l’information. Des problèmes de langage et de communication peuvent aussi apparaître.</li> <li>Chez les enfants atteints d’épilepsie, le risque de TDAH est d’environ 24 pour cent comparativement à 5 pour cent dans la population en général.</li> <li>Il est important d’agir rapidement pour aider les enfants épileptiques ayant des difficultés d’apprentissage. Une évaluation psychopédagogique ou neuropsychologique peut être utile pour déterminer les problèmes et les forces et pour formuler des recommandations pour faciliter l’apprentissage de votre enfant.</li></ul>

 

 

Epilepsy and learning2112.00000000000Epilepsy and learningEpilepsy and learningEEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2010-02-04T05:00:00ZIrene Elliott, RN, MHSc, ACNP;Janice Mulligan, MSW, RSW038.0000000000000805.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>How to help a child with epilepsy deal with learning problems, specifically in areas of attention and concentration, memory, and language difficulties.</p><p>A number of cognitive problems have been identified in children with epilepsy. Although most children with epilepsy have normal intelligence, the distribution of IQ scores leans toward lower values. Even children with normal intelligence may have problems with specific aspects of learning, particularly in the areas of attention and concentration, memory, and academic achievement. In addition, some children with epilepsy have language difficulties, which can also result in learning problems. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Approximately half of children with epilepsy have some type of learning problem such as inattentiveness, short-term memory deficits, or slower speed of processing. Problems with language and communication may also occur.</li> <li>In children with epilepsy, the risk of having ADHD is 24%, compared to 5% in the general population.</li> <li>Early intervention is important to help children with epilepsy and learning difficulties. A psychoeducational assessment or neuropsychological testing can help identify problem areas, areas or strength, and help to inform recommendations for your child's learning.</li></ul><h2>Learning problems</h2> <p>It is estimated that up to one-half of children with epilepsy have some type of learning problem. Learning problems in children with epilepsy range from those who have widespread cognitive delay to those who have only mild and very specific learning problems. The most common learning problems include:</p> <ul><li>inattentiveness</li> <li>short-term memory deficits</li> <li>slower speed of processing.</li></ul> <p>These learning problems most commonly affect academic performance areas of reading, writing and math.</p> <p>Learning problems can cause frustration and increase behavioural and self-esteem problems as the child sees their peers doing things they cannot do or working at a faster pace.</p> <p>Learning problems need to be addressed early so your child can get back on track as soon as possible and continue to develop at their optimum potential.</p> <p>To help your child, you can:</p> <ul><li>talk to them about these problems, to understand how they feel and to figure out how you can help deal with any issues</li> <li>focus on your child’s other skills and talents</li> <li>find a supportive playgroup environment for your child to play and learn in</li> <li>advocate to create a supportive environment in school with your child's teacher and classmates, which will make school easier for your child</li> <li>talk to your child’s doctor or the epilepsy care team and ask their advice about evaluating and treating any problems, especially after a medication is started</li> <li>arrange for a psychoeducational assessment (often done through the schools) or a more comprehensive assessment called neuropsychological testing (usually done privately) if you believe your child has problems with learning. An assessment will help identify your child’s cognitive (thinking) and academic abilities and identify specific learning strengths and deficits. Such testing is often helpful in identifying the need for an IPRC (Identification, Placement, and Review Committee) meeting to facilitate appropriate classroom programming and placement, as well as additional supports such as an educational assistant. Outside Ontario, the procedures may be different; talk to a member of the epilepsy care team or your "local" epilepsy association for more information.</li></ul> <h2>Language and communication problems</h2> <p>Some children with epilepsy have difficulties with communication because of problems in areas of the brain that support language. Examples of problems with speech and language include: </p> <ul><li>difficulty understanding and remembering what you hear and/or what you read</li> <li>problems with speaking clearly</li> <li>problems with expressing ideas or finding specific words.</li></ul> <p>For most people, the left hemisphere (frontal and temporal lobes) of the brain is dominant for language and speech. If a child has a brain abnormality or seizures in the dominant side for language, then they may have language problems.</p> <p>Symptoms of language or speech deficit may occur only at the time of a seizure or for a period following a seizure, or they may be ongoing. </p> <p>Language problems can cause frustration, difficulty in learning, and problems with self-esteem and behaviour. Therefore, they should be addressed early on. </p> <ul><li>Discuss your concerns with your child’s doctor or another member of the epilepsy care team. They can advise you on the appropriateness of seeking services to assist with these difficulties, for example a speech-language pathologist. Speech therapy is a service provided by speech-language pathologists.</li> <li>Discuss your concerns with your child’s teacher or school principal and ask them about speech and language assessment and services. When your child is in school, usually the help is given to your child’s teacher rather than directly to your child. The teacher can also watch for any specific issues that may require professional help.</li></ul> <p>In Ontario, government-funded resources are more available to pre-school children than older children. School-aged children may be able to receive speech and language support through their school. You may need a letter from your child’s doctor.</p> <h2>Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder</h2> <p>In the general population, the prevalence of <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1922&language=English">attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)</a> is approximately 5 per cent, with the majority of affected children having both attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder. In children with epilepsy, the risk of ADHD is around 24 per cent. Children with epilepsy differ from other children with ADHD: their symptoms are predominantly of the inattentive type. There is some evidence that, aside from IQ levels, attention is a strong predictor of how well a child will do academically. Equal numbers of girls and boys with epilepsy have ADHD.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/epilepsy_and_learning.jpgEpilepsy and learning

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