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Epilepsy at schoolEEpilepsy at schoolEpilepsy at schoolEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2022-01-25T05:00:00Z10.200000000000055.00000000000002369.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>School is a large part of every child’s life. Along with engaging in academic learning, children learn how to communicate, interact and socialize with their teachers and peers at school. Read how to help make a positive learning experience for your child.</p><h2>What do teachers and other school personnel need to know about my child’s epilepsy?</h2><p>Ensuring the health and safety of students with <a href="/article?contentid=845&language=english&hub=epilepsy">epilepsy</a> is essential to promoting well-being. It requires a partnership among families, the school community and health-care professionals. </p><p>It is important to share information about your child’s epilepsy with your child’s teachers and other school personnel. The goal is to foster a healthy adjustment for your child in the classroom and when participating in the playground, school trips, sporting activities, and peer interactions.</p><p>Although teachers and other school personnel are not health-care professionals, they play an important role in supporting and ensuring the safety of students with epilepsy. Even if school personnel have general knowledge about epilepsy or know of other students with epilepsy, they require specific information about <strong>your</strong> child’s condition and its management. </p><p>Informing your child’s teachers can be empowering for them and increase their confidence in managing your child’s seizures and supporting them academically and socially. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>It is important to share information about your child’s epilepsy with your child’s teachers and other school personnel to ensure your child’s safety as well as academic and social success. </li><li>There are many things you can do to make sure that your child has a successful experience in school, including open communication with school staff and encouraging your child to participate in regular activities whenever possible. </li></ul><h2>Policy/program memorandum (PPM) No. 161 – Supporting children and students with prevalent medical conditions</h2><p>Ontario requires that all school boards have policies and procedures in place to support students in schools who have prevalent medical conditions. Prevalent medical conditions are defined as those conditions that have the potential to result in a medical incident or life-threatening medical emergency. Epilepsy is one of the conditions (asthma, diabetes and anaphylaxis are other medical conditions currently covered by this legislation).</p><p><a href="http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/healthyschools/medicalconditions.html">Ontario Ministry of Education - Medical Conditions </a></p><p><a href="http://epilepsyontario.org/at-work-school/epilepsy-and-education/for-educators/">Epilepsy Ontario - For Educators</a></p><p><a href="http://www.edugains.ca/newsite/SafeHealthySchools/medical-conditions/Prevalent-Medical-Conditions.html">EduGAINS - Prevalent Medical Conditions</a></p>
L’épilepsie à l’écoleLL’épilepsie à l’écoleEpilepsy at schoolFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2010-02-04T05:00:00Z10.000000000000054.00000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Chaque enfant passe une grande partie de sa vie à l’école. Apprenez-en davantage sur la façon de contribuer à ce que l’école soit une expérience positive pour un enfant atteint d’épilepsie.<br></p><p>En plus de son apprentissage scolaire, l’enfant apprend à communiquer, à interagir et à socialiser avec ses enseignants et pairs. <br></p><ul><li>Rencontrez au préalable le personnel de l’école de votre enfant pour vous assurer qu’ils comprennent sa maladie, ses limitations physiques ou cognitives et ses forces et pour qu’ils sachent quoi faire en cas d’urgence.</li><li>Défendez les intérêts de votre enfant lorsqu’il est à l’école en établissant une relation permanente avec l’enseignant et vous assurant qu’il reçoit l’éducation à laquelle il a droit.</li><li>Établissez un plan avec l’école pour déterminer quand votre enfant aura besoin de manquer l’école pour recevoir des traitements ou en raison de sa maladie.<br></li></ul>

 

 

EpilepsyEpilepsyEpilepsyEEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2018-01-19T05:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>A seizure is caused by a sudden electrical disturbance in the brain. Because the brain controls the body, this disturbance affects the body. Find information about different types of seizures, diagnostic procedures and treatment options.</p><p>Epilepsy (seizure disorder) is diagnosed when a child has two or more unprovoked seizures (seizures that are not caused by an acute illness, fever or immediate head injury). A seizure is caused by a sudden electrical disturbance in the brain. Because the brain controls the body, this disturbance affects the body. Find information about epilepsy, including seizure and syndrome descriptions, diagnostic procedures, treatment options, and coping at home and at school.</p><p></p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">About epilepsy</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Epilepsy, or seizure disorder, is a general term for a number of different conditions. Learn about the different types of epilepsy, what can cause seizures and what to do in case of a seizure. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=845&language=English">Epilepsy: An overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1307&language=English">An overview of the brain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2057&language=English">What causes seizures?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2058&language=English">Types of epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2059&language=English">Genetics of epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2060&language=English">Signs and symptoms of seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2104&language=English">What to do in case of a seizure</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Understanding epilepsy diagnosis</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Sometimes a diagnosis is made right away, but sometimes it takes a while, especially if your child is very young. Diagnosis may include the type of seizures; whether the seizures are idiopathic, symptomatic or cryptogenic; or if they are a specific epilepsy syndrome. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2061&language=English">Understanding your child's epilepsy diagnosis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2062&language=English">Coping with the diagnosis of epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2063&language=English">Prognosis for a child with epilepsy</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Types of seizures</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2064&language=English">Types of seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2065&language=English">Absence seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2066&language=English">Tonic, clonic and tonic-clonic seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2067&language=English">Myoclonic seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2068&language=English">Atonic seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2069&language=English">Simple partial seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2070&language=English">Complex partial seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2071&language=English">Status epilepticus</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2072&language=English">Neonatal seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1&language=English">Febrile seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2088&language=English">Pyridoxine-dependent seizures</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Epilepsy syndromes</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=859&language=English">Infantile spasms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2073&language=English">Benign partial epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2074&language=English">Temporal lobe epilepsies</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2075&language=English">Rasmussen syndrome</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2076&language=English">Childhood and juvenile absence epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2077&language=English">Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2078&language=English">Lennox-Gastaut syndrome</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2079&language=English">Landau-Kleffner syndrome</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2080&language=English">Reflex epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2081&language=English">Partial epilepsy syndromes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2082&language=English">Generalized epilepsy syndromes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2083&language=English">Encephalopathies and progressive epilepsy syndromes</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Diagnostic procedures</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2084&language=English">How epilepsy is diagnosed</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1277&language=English">EEG (Electroencephalogram)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1272&language=English">CT Scan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1270&language=English">Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2085&language=English">Diagnosing causes of seizures through blood, cerebrospinal fluid and urine tests</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Treatment of epilepsy with medications</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Medications called anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are the first choice of treatment for epilepsy. For most children, the first medication tried is successful in controlling their seizures. Learn about the different medications that are used.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2086&language=English">Medications for epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2089&language=English">Side effects and interactions from anti-epileptic drugs</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2090&language=English">Managing and monitoring anti-epileptic drugs</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2087&language=English">Common anti-epileptic drugs</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Common anti-epileptic drugs</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=63&language=English">Acetazolamide</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=90&language=English">Carbamazepine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=106&language=English">Clobazam</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=107&language=English">Clonazepam</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=123&language=English">Diazepam</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=133&language=English">Ethosuximide</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=145&language=English">Gabapentin</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=168&language=English">Lamotrigine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=172&language=English">Levetiracetam</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=175&language=English">Lorazepam</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=200&language=English">Nitrazepam</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=215&language=English">Phenobarbital</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=216&language=English">Phenytoin</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=255&language=English">Topiramate</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=258&language=English">Valproate</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=260&language=English">Vigabatrin</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Treatment of epilepsy with surgery</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>If medications fail to control the seizures, another kind of treatment, such as surgery, may be considered. Find information about the different types of surgery that are possible. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2091&language=English">Surgical treatment of epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2092&language=English">Deciding about epilepsy surgery: Points to consider</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Pre-surgical evaluation</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1280&language=English">Evoked potentials (EP)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2047&language=English">Electroencephalogram (EEG) before epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2048&language=English">Epilepsy monitoring unit: Testing with video EEG</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2049&language=English">Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2050&language=English">Functional MRI before epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2051&language=English">Magnetoencephalography (MEG) before epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2052&language=English">Positron emission tomography (PET) scan before epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2053&language=English">Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan before epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2054&language=English">Neuropsychological assessment before epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2055&language=English">Etomidate speech and memory (eSAM) test before epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2056&language=English">Invasive electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring before epilepsy surgery</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Epilepsy surgery</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1108&language=English">Preparing for surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2093&language=English">What to expect on the day of epilepsy surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2094&language=English">Temporal resection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2095&language=English">Extratemporal resection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2096&language=English">Corpus callosotomy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2097&language=English">Hemispherectomy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2103&language=English">Controlling epilepsy with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS)</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Dietary therapies for epilepsy</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Dietary therapy is a type of treatment that can be tried if medications are not working or are causing severe side effects, and for children where surgery is not an option. All forms of dietary therapy involve restricting carbohydrates and increasing fat. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2098&language=English">Dietary therapies for epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2099&language=English">Ketogenic diet for epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2100&language=English">Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) diet for epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2101&language=English">Modified Atkins diet for epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2102&language=English">Low glycemic index treatment (LGIT) for epilepsy</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">At home and at school</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Epilepsy involves more than simply trying to manage seizures. Living with epilepsy can be a very stressful experience. Learn about seizure safety, epilepsy and your child’s health, coping with epilepsy as a family, your child’s quality of life and issues related to school. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2104&language=English">What to do in case of a seizure</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2105&language=English">How to keep your child safe inside and outside the home</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2106&language=English">Clinic visits for a child with epilepsy</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Coping with epilepsy</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"> <li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2108&language=English">Looking after yourself when a child has epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2109&language=English">Helping your child cope with epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2110&language=English">Coping with epilepsy as a family</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Epilepsy and quality of life</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2111&language=English">Epilepsy and physical health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2112&language=English">Epilepsy and learning</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2113&language=English">Epilepsy and behaviour</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2114&language=English">Epilepsy and emotions</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Epilepsy and school</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2115&language=English">Assessing your child's learning needs</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2116&language=English">Epilepsy at school</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Leisure and recreation</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2117&language=English">Epilepsy and travel</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2118&language=English">Epilepsy and sports</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Looking ahead</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about some of the specific issues you and your family will face during the transition into adulthood, including the transition to adult epilepsy care; driving; going to college or university; and dating, sexuality and pregnancy. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2119&language=English">Epilepsy: Transition to adult health care</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2120&language=English">Driving with epilepsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2121&language=English">Epilepsy and college or university</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2122&language=English">Sex and reproduction</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Epilepsy resources and support</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some information about different types of resources and support. Also learn about clinical trials, research and informed consent.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2123&language=English">Epilepsy resources and support</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1267&language=English">Research and clinical trials: An overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1264&language=English">Clinical trials and your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1265&language=English">Informed consent for treatment and research</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/PDF_Parents_Checklist.pdf">Epilepsy Checklist – What do you know about your child’s epilepsy?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/PDF_My_Childs_Care_Team.pdf">My child's epilepsy care team</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/PDF_Recording_Seizures.pdf">Describing and recording seizures</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/PDF_Teens_Checklist.pdf">Epilepsy Checklist for Teens – What do you know about your epilepsy?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/PDF_Care_Team_Teens.pdf">My epilepsy care team (for teens)</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/epilepsy_learning_hub.jpgepilepsy

 

 

Epilepsy at school2116.00000000000Epilepsy at schoolEpilepsy at schoolEEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2022-01-25T05:00:00Z10.200000000000055.00000000000002369.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>School is a large part of every child’s life. Along with engaging in academic learning, children learn how to communicate, interact and socialize with their teachers and peers at school. Read how to help make a positive learning experience for your child.</p><h2>What do teachers and other school personnel need to know about my child’s epilepsy?</h2><p>Ensuring the health and safety of students with <a href="/article?contentid=845&language=english&hub=epilepsy">epilepsy</a> is essential to promoting well-being. It requires a partnership among families, the school community and health-care professionals. </p><p>It is important to share information about your child’s epilepsy with your child’s teachers and other school personnel. The goal is to foster a healthy adjustment for your child in the classroom and when participating in the playground, school trips, sporting activities, and peer interactions.</p><p>Although teachers and other school personnel are not health-care professionals, they play an important role in supporting and ensuring the safety of students with epilepsy. Even if school personnel have general knowledge about epilepsy or know of other students with epilepsy, they require specific information about <strong>your</strong> child’s condition and its management. </p><p>Informing your child’s teachers can be empowering for them and increase their confidence in managing your child’s seizures and supporting them academically and socially. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>It is important to share information about your child’s epilepsy with your child’s teachers and other school personnel to ensure your child’s safety as well as academic and social success. </li><li>There are many things you can do to make sure that your child has a successful experience in school, including open communication with school staff and encouraging your child to participate in regular activities whenever possible. </li></ul><h2>How should I inform my child’s school about their epilepsy?</h2><p>You will need to arrange a face-to-face meeting with your child’s teachers and other school personnel to discuss your child’s epilepsy and management plan at the beginning of each school year, if a new diagnosis happens during the school year, or if your child changes schools during the school year.</p><p>At this meeting you should discuss the following.</p><ul><li>Describe what your child’s seizures look like, how often the seizures occur, and how best to support your child during a seizure and after a seizure occurs. </li><li>Outline the medication(s) your child is on and whether medication needs to be given during the school day.</li><li>The cognitive, psychological (behavioural and emotional) and social consequences of epilepsy are fundamental to school success:</li><ul><li>Be clear about what, if any, cognitive, psychological and social concerns you have for your child. This information can help your child’s teachers determine what types of accommodations or supports might be useful. </li><li>Make sure to highlight your child’s strengths and areas of interest so that they understand your child. </li></ul><li>If relevant to your child, advise the school that your child may have higher rates of school absenteeism to recover from seizures, attend medical appointments or to test new treatments. </li><ul><li>Establish a plan with the school for when your child has to miss school. </li></ul><li>Encourage the school to promote social interaction and to treat your child as they would any other child. </li></ul><p>Complete an information form or write a concise letter about your child’s epilepsy (on your own or with the help of your child’s doctor or epilepsy care team) to help school personnel remember important facts. Make copies of the letter for your child’s principal, school administrator and teacher to keep on hand for reference. The letter can explain the following things.</p><ul><li>Epilepsy is…</li><li>A seizure is…</li><li>What you need to know about my child’s condition: what their seizures look like, how often they have a seizure, what happens before a seizure, what happens after a seizure. </li><li>Limitations (physical, cognitive)</li><li>Medications</li><li>What to do if they have a seizure (seizure response plan; see "Seizure safety" below)</li><li>Feelings or symptoms they may experience before, during or after a seizure (ask your child for this description)</li></ul><h2>Seizure safety: Plan of action</h2><p>Often, the most pressing information your child’s school wants to know about your child’s epilepsy are what your child’s seizure look like and how to manage your child’s seizures. </p><p>The school should have a Plan of Action in place in case your child has a seizure during the school day. The plan should include:</p><ul><li>what to do in case of a seizure</li><li>when to call you</li><li>if and when to call an ambulance</li></ul><p>Ideally, the Plan of Action should be created by you and your child, in consultation with your child's doctor or members of the epilepsy care team if required. It can then be discussed with school personnel.</p><p>In addition, schools may require a letter from your child’s neurologist, paediatrician or other physician in the following situations:</p><ul><li>if your child might need an emergency medication, such as <a href="/article?contentid=176&language=english">lorazepam</a>, to stop a seizure at school</li><li>if your child's plan of action includes instructions about when to call 911</li><li>if there are physical restrictions</li></ul><h2>What can I do to make sure my child has a successful school experience?</h2><p>There are many things you can do to make sure that your child has a successful experience in school. </p><h3>Communication</h3><p>Keep the lines of communication open between you and your child’s school so that everyone involved in your child’s care is aware of their current situation, enabling you to work together to monitor your child’s academic progress and peer relationships as well as to address any concerns or problems if they arise. </p><p>Let your child’s doctor or other epilepsy care team members know if there are any changes that you are concerned about, so they can help find solutions.</p><h3>Monitor your child</h3><p>Fatigue is a common complaint of children living with epilepsy and may be related to medications, poor sleep patterns due to seizures during the night, or following a seizure at school. Fatigue can affect their experience in school (e.g., ability to participate fully or to concentrate for long periods of time). They may fall asleep in class or nap when they arrive home from school. Fatigue may make it difficult for them to participate in after-school programs or to finish homework. If your child complains of fatigue or if you notice changes in their epilepsy levels, your child may need to go to bed earlier. </p><p>You may need to speak with the school regarding some of the following considerations:</p><ul><li>Reduce the amount of work that your child is expected to complete within a specific amount of time. </li><li>An opportunity to do tests over a series of several days.</li><li>A reduction in the amount of homework that is assigned.</li><li>Offering less intensive classes later in the day.</li><li>Reducing the course load for high school students.</li></ul><p>Acknowledge that changes in how your child feels from day to day or throughout the day are normal. There may be days when your child’s learning, engagement in the classroom, ability to make connections and temperament are good. There may also be other days when your child is easily distracted, they forget previously learned information or they are more irritable than normal.</p><h3>Encourage participation in school activities </h3><p>Although it might seem like limiting a child’s physical activity is in their best interest, doing so may encourage social isolation and interfere with many opportunities to learn and practice important motor skills, executive functioning and social skills. Every effort should be made to ensure that your child participates in physical activities including gym, recess, lunch, extracurricular sports and field trips. </p><p>If your neurologist recommends restrictions due to treatment or risks, ask for a letter to share with the school that specifies exactly what your child needs to be restricted from. Also ask for an updated letter once the restrictions are removed.</p><h3>In the classroom</h3><p>Support from classmates can help your child. It is important that your child interacts with their peers. Children who feel they have more support from classmates are more content. </p><p>Your child may worry about answering questions about epilepsy from classmates. As a parent, you can try to imagine questions your child may be asked and rehearse the answers. </p><p>For example, if a classmate asks, "Can other people catch seizures?", your child could explain that, "Epilepsy isn’t like a cold; you can’t catch it from somebody else." Helping your child develop responses or scripts in advance can help ease the anxiety related to responding to other students to some extent.</p><p>Communicating with classmates about epilepsy can remove questions and concerns they may have. With the agreement and support of your child, consider having an in-class information session to teach your child’s classmates about epilepsy and help to create a supportive environment.</p><p>In this session, classmates can learn about your child’s condition and ask any questions. Your local epilepsy association may have educators that can go into schools and meet with students and staff to provide education. Try to address the questions that classmates raise. </p><p>Children take their cues from adults. Being straightforward, answering questions honestly, and reassuring children that they have no need to be scared can help create a supportive environment. Be careful not to give out more information than your child knows themselves. </p><p>If peer relationships are difficult for your child, seek out another student who may be interested in supporting your child in class, in consultation with the teacher and the school. Some ideas that have helped others are: </p><ul><li>Having a "safe friend": Find a responsible child a few years older than your child, perhaps a neighbour or another student, to be your child’s buddy. This friend can watch out for your child, listen if your child is having problems and provide a sense of security. </li><li>Having a peer tutor: A student in a higher grade, may take on the role of "tutor." The details of the role could be discussed with the teacher. It might simply involve weekly "check in" meetings with your child to find out what they enjoyed learning and what they found difficult that week. </li></ul><p>It is your decision how much information you wish to share with the parents of your child’s classmates. </p><ul><li>You might wish to share some information to enlist their support. </li><li>It may also be important for them to know how to handle a seizure if your child goes to their house to play or study. </li></ul><p>Sharing information about your child’s condition is as important as respecting your child’s privacy. Striking a balance between disclosure and privacy is something that you can decide with your child. Think about what you would like to say in order to maintain your child’s privacy. </p><h2>How and when to advocate on your child’s behalf</h2><p>Advocate on your child’s behalf if you have concerns regarding your child’s engagement in the classroom or their learning style or academic achievement. Difficulties with attention, processing speed and memory are common among children with living with epilepsy.</p><p>Share your concerns with your child’s teachers and discuss whether your child’s progress should be reviewed through a Special Education Resource Team (SERT) meeting. The purpose of the meeting is to review a student’s progress in order to develop <a href="/article?contentid=2115&language=english&hub=epilepsy">appropriate supports</a> that will allow the child access to the curriculum, consider whether remedial support or consultant services would be helpful and determine whether a psychoeducational assessment or speech and language assessment would be helpful to better understand the child’s learning style and provide recommendations.</p><p>Depending on your child’s learning style, it may be appropriate to discuss some or all of the following classroom accommodations with your child’s teachers:</p><ul><li>Set clear rules and expectations in the classroom. </li><li>Seat your child near the teacher to help their "focus" and avoid distraction. </li><li>Post a schedule for the day that your child can follow visually. This strategy can provide a sense of predictability and allows your child to re-orient themselves in the event of missed information due to seizure activity. </li><li>Use visual tools to teach, such as charts and illustrations.</li><li>Use physical prompts such as pointing to the appropriate part of the page or covering up sections of a page.</li><li>Use key words or phrases to help shift the child’s attention.</li><li>Explore whether assistive technology may be useful (e.g. voice to text software)</li><li>Ensure that your child masters the skill being taught before moving on to the next skill or concept. Check back in for understanding. </li><li>Use "stop and think" techniques, which help teach children to "monitor" their behaviour and think before they act. </li><li>Allow extra time for tests and assignments and give your child extra time to respond in class.</li><li>Provide extra help with problem areas.</li><li>Ask your child to repeat back instructions to be sure that they understand them.</li><li>"Check in" with your child each day to see how they are doing and feeling.</li></ul><h2>Transition to high school </h2><p>If your child is falling behind at school and needs extra help, consider the possibility of extra tutoring. Seeking help from a guidance counsellor early on, regarding future school plans, is important. </p><p>Stay on top of your child's progress at school. Talk to them about which subjects they do well at, and which are more difficult. Set up regular times for your child to meet or communicate with their teacher to discuss concerns.</p><p>As a parent, you may also wish to set up a separate time to meet with your child’s teacher to discuss your child’s progress. Find out the teacher’s perspective on how things are going and how you can help your child at home. Organize tutoring or other support as necessary if your child is struggling or falling behind. </p><p><strong>Regardless of the age or your child, you can also obtain advice from the epilepsy care team and "local" epilepsy association. </strong></p><h2>Policy/program memorandum (PPM) No. 161 – Supporting children and students with prevalent medical conditions</h2><p>Ontario requires that all school boards have policies and procedures in place to support students in schools who have prevalent medical conditions. Prevalent medical conditions are defined as those conditions that have the potential to result in a medical incident or life-threatening medical emergency. Epilepsy is one of the conditions (asthma, diabetes and anaphylaxis are other medical conditions currently covered by this legislation).</p><p><a href="http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/healthyschools/medicalconditions.html">Ontario Ministry of Education - Medical Conditions </a></p><p><a href="http://epilepsyontario.org/at-work-school/epilepsy-and-education/for-educators/">Epilepsy Ontario - For Educators</a></p><p><a href="http://www.edugains.ca/newsite/SafeHealthySchools/medical-conditions/Prevalent-Medical-Conditions.html">EduGAINS - Prevalent Medical Conditions</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/epilepsy_at_school.jpgEpilepsy at schoolFalse

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