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Epilepsy and travelEEpilepsy and travelEpilepsy and travelEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2014-05-26T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, Peng10.000000000000048.0000000000000480.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to make travel safe and enjoyable for a child with epilepsy</p><p>Most children with epilepsy and their families are able to travel nearby or abroad. Most children are also able to attend day camps and overnight camps. However, careful planning is necessary to ensure a safe and enjoyable holiday.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Before traveling with your child, talk to the epilepsy team, understand how travel will impact your child's health, and be prepared with medications or in case of emergencies.</li> <li>Meet with the camp director and staff to ensure they know about your child's condition and know what to do in case of a seizure or an emergency.</li></ul>
L’épilepsie et les voyagesLL’épilepsie et les voyagesEpilepsy and travelFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2014-05-26T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, Peng10.000000000000048.00000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez comment faire en sorte que les voyages soient sécuritaires et amusants pour un enfant épileptique.</p><p>La plupart des enfants atteints d’épilepsie et leur famille peuvent voyager au pays ou à l’étranger. La plupart peuvent aussi participer à des camps de jour et des camps de vacances. Cependant, une planification minutieuse est requise pour vous assurer de passer des vacances amusantes en toute sécurité.</p><ul><li>Avant de voyager avec votre enfant, parlez-en à l’équipe de soins de l’épilepsie, assurez-vous de comprendre les conséquences du voyage sur sa santé et préparez ses médicaments ainsi qu’un plan d’urgence.</li> <li>Rencontrez le directeur et le personnel du camp pour vous assurer qu’ils sont informés de la maladie de votre enfant et qu’ils savent quoi faire en cas d’urgence ou de crise.</li></ul>

 

 

Epilepsy and travel2117.00000000000Epilepsy and travelEpilepsy and travelEEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+) EducatorsNA2014-05-26T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, Peng10.000000000000048.0000000000000480.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to make travel safe and enjoyable for a child with epilepsy</p><p>Most children with epilepsy and their families are able to travel nearby or abroad. Most children are also able to attend day camps and overnight camps. However, careful planning is necessary to ensure a safe and enjoyable holiday.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Before traveling with your child, talk to the epilepsy team, understand how travel will impact your child's health, and be prepared with medications or in case of emergencies.</li> <li>Meet with the camp director and staff to ensure they know about your child's condition and know what to do in case of a seizure or an emergency.</li></ul><h2>Tips for safe travel</h2><h3>Talk with your child’s epilepsy team</h3><ul><li>If you are planning a long trip, or a trip to remote regions or very far from home, you may want to meet with the doctor or members of the epilepsy care team at least four to six weeks before you leave.</li><li>Ask the epilepsy team about how much medication to take, how best to stick to medication schedules, how to store medication in hot or cold climates, how to contact the team in case of emergency, which doctors to contact while travelling, which doctor or hospital to contact at your destination and any other concerns you may have.</li><li>If you are planning to travel overseas, ask which vaccinations are needed and how they might affect your child or interact with their medications.</li></ul><h3>​Understand the effect of travel on your child’s health</h3><ul><li>Make sure your child is well rested before travel.</li><li>Try to keep your child on a regular schedule of eating and sleeping to minimize the stress and fatigue of travel. Fatigue can place some children at a higher risk of getting a seizure.</li><li>Understand that travel to different time zones may require changes to your child’s medication and sleep schedules.</li></ul><h3>​Be prepared if your child needs medical care</h3><ul><li>Find out about your child’s medical insurance coverage at your destination. Arrange for coverage beforehand if necessary. In some instances, it might be difficult to obtain travel insurance abroad because your child has a pre-existing medical condition.</li><li>Ask the epilepsy care team or your child’s doctor for a letter that summarizes your child’s condition and treatment, including medications. Keep this letter on hand to show when you need medical care during your travels.</li></ul><h3>Organize medications</h3><ul><li>Take enough anti-epileptic medication for the entire trip and some to spare.</li><li>Keep the extra supply separately from the main supply in case one of your bags is lost or stolen.</li><li>If you are taking a plane, make sure all the medication is in your carry-on baggage. Keep all medications in their original, labelled bottles or packages.</li><li>Bring a letter from your doctor in your carry-on baggage explaining your child’s condition and the medications they need. Also bring the prescriptions for the medications.</li></ul><h3>Be prepared for emergencies</h3><ul><li>Take the phone numbers of key members of the epilepsy care team and any names of experts or clinics in your holiday location.</li><li>Know how to manage a seizure. Know who and what numbers to call in case of emergencies.</li><li>Make sure your child wears some form of epilepsy identification, such as a <a href="http://www.medicalert.ca/" target="_blank">Medic Alert​</a> bracelet.</li></ul><h2>Epilepsy and camp</h2><h3>Day camp</h3><p>The preparation for day camps is similar to preparation for a family day out or a day trip at school.</p><p>Meet the camp director and counsellor before the start of the camp session to inform them about your child’s condition: what is epilepsy, what is a seizure, what to do in case of a seizure, medication your child needs to take through the day, what specific assistance your child may need, when to phone you, important contact phone numbers, explain possible triggers and how to avoid them. </p><p>Find out the types and levels of activities your child will be participating in so if there are any specific safety requirements that you need to share with the staff, you can do so. Most safety requirements are important for all campers to follow. </p><p>Ensure your child has a place to rest, if they should need it. If your child experiences a seizure at camp, this is a time they may require some rest afterwards. They may wish to rejoin activities as soon as they are able to.</p><h3>Overnight epilepsy camp</h3><p>Overnight camps are also an option for your child. To provide a happy and safe camping experience and to provide children with epilepsy the opportunity to meet with others who also experience seizures, some epilepsy organizations have set up camps especially for children with epilepsy. For example, Epilepsy Ontario organizes the "Summerfest" camp each summer. These camps usually have trained staff members on site who are experienced in the care of children with epilepsy, including doctors and nurses.</p><p>These camps give children the opportunity to spend several days or weeks with other campers who also have epilepsy. Many campers are "excited" to be with other campers who are experiencing the same condition and associated issues. For some children, especially those from smaller communities, this may be their first experience of not being the only child with epilepsy. Everyone at the camp understands about epilepsy, so children feel there is no need to be embarrassed. This type of environment gives children a chance to openly express themselves, not be embarrassed about their condition, and safely enjoy their camping experience. </p><p>Children are not the only ones who benefit from a camp dedicated specifically to children with epilepsy. Many parents find comfort in knowing that their children are in the care of competent staff who are familiar with seizures and will support their child in terms of safety, social, and emotional issues. With such a support system, the children can enjoy the full range of camp experiences, including swimming, boating, trekking, crafts, and drama, without the responsibility of managing their epilepsy care alone. </p><p>Apart from camps for children with epilepsy, there are also camps for children with chronic conditions that you can explore. Reach for the Rainbow is an organization that offers integrated summer camp opportunities across Ontario for children and youth with special needs. </p><h3>Overnight camp</h3><p>Some children and teens prefer to attend camps that are not specifically aimed at serving campers with epilepsy or other chronic conditions. This is certainly an option for your child. It is important that your child is already responsible for their medications and that their seizures are fairly well controlled. Some planning and simple guidelines will help ensure a safe and happy camping experience: </p><ul><li>Before camp begins, meet with the camp director and staff to inform them about your child’s condition, including a list of medication(s) being taken and their schedule, a list of instructions explaining what to do in case of a seizure, pre- and post- seizure symptoms, and noticeable side effects of medications.</li><li>Make sure that the management and staff of the camp have procedures in place to handle medical emergencies, and that they understand what counts as an emergency for your child. Also, talk to your epilepsy team to determine the maximum distance away from camp a doctor or clinic can be in the event of an emergency.</li><li>Your child should already be responsible for their day–to-day care and should be able to practice this at home. They should be willing and able to take their medications on schedule and assume a healthy lifestyle, with adequate sleep and food. However, depending on the age of the child and the specific camp, some camp administrators may be prepared to give your child their medications or any other support they may require.</li></ul><p>You can find out about different camps for your child from the epilepsy care team, school, "local" epilepsy association, other parents, and "local" camping organizations. For example, the Ontario Camping Association lists camps for children with special needs. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/epilepsy_and_travel.jpgEpilepsy and travel

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