Transplant: How to get support from your networkTTransplant: How to get support from your networkTransplant: How to get support from your networkEnglishOtherTeen (13-18 years)NANAProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-11-07T05:00:00ZMoira Korus, RN8.0000000000000070.0000000000000680.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to make the most of your network to get the support you need when a child has a long-term illness.</p><p>Having a child with a chronic illness can be very isolating. However, having a good support network can make a world of difference to your wellbeing and ability to cope.</p> <p>Friends and extended family are usually the people who provide practical, emotional and sometimes financial support during times of stress. Religion or spiritual beliefs can also be a very important source of support.</p><p>Although friends and extended family offer support, relationships with them can become strained when your child is ill. For example, people may give you advice that you have not asked for and ask more questions than you are willing or able to answer. On the other hand, you might find it difficult to repeatedly ask for help with child care or rides to the hospital.</p><p>You also know that your friends and family have their own lives to deal with and may feel like you are bothering them. Relationships can start to feel a bit one-sided and you may feel like you are taking more than you are giving.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>When a child is ill, support from friends, family and religious or spiritual groups can make a huge difference.</li> <li>Sometimes, however, relationships can become strained if you do not get the support you may need or if you feel uncomfortable asking for help repeatedly.</li> <li>If you feel that relations may be strained, talk it out with the friend or family memember.</li> <li>To get the support you need, when you need it, be specific with your requests and remember that you can return the favour when your child's health is more stable.</li> </ul>
La transplantation: l'assistance de votre réseauLLa transplantation: l'assistance de votre réseauTransplant: How to get support from your networkFrenchOtherTeen (13-18 years)NANAProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-11-07T05:00:00ZMoira Korus, RN8.0000000000000070.0000000000000680.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez comment tirer le meilleur parti de votre réseau pour obtenir le soutien dont vous avez besoin lorsque votre enfant a une maladie de longue durée.</p><p>Le fait d’avoir un enfant qui est atteint d’une maladie chronique peut fortement isoler les parents. Profiter d’un bon réseau de soutien peut cependant faire ​toute la différence.</p> <p>Ce sont généralement les amis et les membres de la famille élargie qui fournissent aux parents d’un enfant aux prises avec une maladie chronique le soutien pratique, affectif, et parfois pécuniaire, pendant les périodes de grand stress. Les croyances religieuses ou spirituelles peuvent alors aussi procurer un important réconfort.</p><p>Bien que vos amis et les membres de votre famille élargie vous offrent leur soutien, vos relations avec eux peuvent devenir tendues quand votre enfant est malade. Par exemple, ces personnes peuvent vous donner des conseils alors que vous ne leur en avez pas demandés ou vous poser des questions auxquelles vous ne souhaitez pas ou ne pouvez pas répondre. En revanche, il pourrait vous être difficile d’avoir à demander sans arrêt qu’on vous vienne en aide avec les soins ou qu’on vous amène à l’hôpital.</p><p>Puisque vous reconnaissez que vos amis et les membres de votre famille doivent aussi s’occuper de leur propre vie, vous avez peut-être le sentiment de les déranger. Vous pouvez aussi commencer à penser que vous êtes quelque peu seul à tenir aux relations avec ces personnes et vous pouvez avoir le sentiment d’abuser de leur soutien.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Quand un enfant est malade, le soutien de ses amis, de sa famille et de groupes religieux ou spirituels peut faire une énorme différence.</li><li>Toutefois, il arrive parfois que les rapports se détériorent si vous n’avez pas le soutien dont vous avez besoin ou si vous êtes mal à l’aise de demander de l’aide de manière répétitive.</li><li>Si vous sentez que les relations peuvent se détériorer, parlez-en avec un ami ou un membre de la famille.</li><li>Pour obtenir le soutien dont vous avez besoin et quand vous en avez besoin, soyez précis dans vos demandes et n’oubliez pas que vous pourrez rendre la pareille dès que la santé de votre enfant sera plus stable.</li></ul>

 

 

Transplant: How to get support from your network2427.00000000000Transplant: How to get support from your networkTransplant: How to get support from your networkTEnglishOtherTeen (13-18 years)NANAProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-11-07T05:00:00ZMoira Korus, RN8.0000000000000070.0000000000000680.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to make the most of your network to get the support you need when a child has a long-term illness.</p><p>Having a child with a chronic illness can be very isolating. However, having a good support network can make a world of difference to your wellbeing and ability to cope.</p> <p>Friends and extended family are usually the people who provide practical, emotional and sometimes financial support during times of stress. Religion or spiritual beliefs can also be a very important source of support.</p><p>Although friends and extended family offer support, relationships with them can become strained when your child is ill. For example, people may give you advice that you have not asked for and ask more questions than you are willing or able to answer. On the other hand, you might find it difficult to repeatedly ask for help with child care or rides to the hospital.</p><p>You also know that your friends and family have their own lives to deal with and may feel like you are bothering them. Relationships can start to feel a bit one-sided and you may feel like you are taking more than you are giving.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>When a child is ill, support from friends, family and religious or spiritual groups can make a huge difference.</li> <li>Sometimes, however, relationships can become strained if you do not get the support you may need or if you feel uncomfortable asking for help repeatedly.</li> <li>If you feel that relations may be strained, talk it out with the friend or family memember.</li> <li>To get the support you need, when you need it, be specific with your requests and remember that you can return the favour when your child's health is more stable.</li> </ul><h2>How to get the support you need</h2> <p>If you feel that your relationships are suffering, talk about it with the family member or friend and see how they feel about it. Remember too that we all give and receive support at different times in our lives. When your child’s medical situation is more stable, you will be able to offer to help the people who are helping you now.</p> <h3>Ideas from other parents</h3> <p>One parent said:</p> <div class="callOut"><p>“When my daughter was first diagnosed, lots of people said ‘If there’s anything I can do, let me know.’ I didn’t know what to say or what to ask for. I’m smarter now: when she’s sick and someone says that, I say, ‘Thank you! Do you think you could take care of my younger daughter on Saturday?’ or ‘That would be great! I’d really appreciate it if you could pick up some groceries and drop them off at my place.’ Then I give them a short grocery list. I’ve realized that I have to be very specific, and people have learned not to offer if they don’t want to help.”</p></div> <p>Another parent spoke of changes in their social circle.</p> <div class="callOut"><p> “I have lost some friends and made some new ones as I realize that some people can handle a friend talking about their sick child, and some people can’t. I try to only be around people who make things easier for me, not harder.”</p></div> <p>For some parents, immediate family have helped them the most.</p> <div class="callOut"><p>“We could not have gotten through transplant without the help of my husband’s parents. They took care of our other children and our dog, they were always there when I needed a shoulder to cry on and they even offered us some money when things were really tight. We felt so grateful, but we also felt like we could never pay them back for what they had done. We decided to take a picture of our family holding a big sign that said “Thank you Nona and Bubba”. We framed the picture and wrote a letter from the heart for them. They loved it, and even though it didn’t really pay them back, they know how grateful we are for their support.”</p></div> <h2>Further information</h2> <p>For more information on the impact of an organ transplant, please see the following pages.</p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=2432&language=English">Impact of a transplant on your child</a></p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=2431&language=English">Impact of a transplant on siblings</a></p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=2430&language=English">Impact of a transplant on parents and caregivers</a></p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=2429&language=English">Impact of a transplant on finances</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/transplant_how_to_get_support_from_your_network.jpgTransplant: How to get support from your network

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