Angiogram using image guidanceAAngiogram using image guidanceAngiogram using image guidanceEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyArteriesTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-09T05:00:00ZCandice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michelle Cote, BScN, RN;Joao Amaral, MD8.0000000000000061.00000000000001181.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn what an angiogram is and how it is done using image guidance.</p><h2>What is an angiogram?</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Kidney angiogram</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PMD_angiogram_renal_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>An angiogram is a procedure that uses a special dye, called contrast, and X-rays to see the arteries inside your child’s body. An artery is a blood vessel, which carries blood away from the heart to the tissues in the body. Angiograms are done by interventional radiologists.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>An angiogram uses medical imaging to create a map of the arteries so they can be seen on an X-ray. Contrast dye is injected through an artery to outline the artery shape.</li> <li>Angiograms are usually low-risk procedures.</li> <li>You will be asked to sign a consent form before the procedure.</li> <li>Be calm, honest and tell your child what to expect. Children feel less nervous and scared when they are given information about what will happen to them.</li> <li>Your child will most likely be given a general anaesthetic.</li> </ul><h2>On the day of the angiogram</h2><p>Arrive at the hospital two hours before the planned time of your child’s procedure. Once you are checked in, your child will be dressed in a hospital gown, weighed and assessed by a nurse. You will also be able to speak to the interventional radiologist who will be doing the angiogram, and the anesthetist who will be giving your child medication to make them comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>During the angiogram, you will be asked to wait in the surgical waiting area.</p><h2>Your child will have medicine for pain</h2><p>Children are given medicine for treatments that may be frightening, uncomfortable or painful. For angiograms, most children are given <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> and <a href="/article?contentid=3001&language=English">local anaesthesia</a> at the groin or arm where the catheter is inserted to make sure they are comfortable. Occasionally, in older children, angiograms are done with local anesthesia only.</p><h2>How an angiogram is done</h2><p>The interventional radiologist will insert a tiny tube, called a catheter, into an artery in the groin (the area at the top of the leg) or in the arm. The catheter is then directed into the area that requires imaging. Next, a special dye, called contrast, is injected into the catheter. The dye is a clear, colourless liquid that helps to outline the arteries so they will show up on an X-ray. The doctor then uses X-rays to take pictures of the arteries.</p><p>Some children will be given blood thinners during the procedure to help keep the artery from clotting (blocking).</p><p>When the procedure is finished, the catheter is taken out of the artery. The radiologist presses on the artery in the groin or arm to stop any bleeding.</p><p>An angiogram can take from 45 minutes to two hours, depending on how complex the arteries being examined are. It can also take longer if any additional treatments are done to the arteries.</p><h2>After the angiogram</h2><p>Once the angiogram is complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. As soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you.</p><p>Your child should remain on their back with their leg or arm kept straight while in the recovery area and for six hours after the procedure. Some pressure may be applied at the insertion site in the groin or arm to prevent further bleeding.</p><h2>Going home</h2><p>In most cases, children go home the same day as the procedure. This usually occurs about six hours after the procedure. Your child’s nurse will let you know when they are well enough to go home.</p><p>For more details on how to care for your child after an angiogram, please see <a href="/Article?contentid=1222&language=English">Angiogram: Caring for your child at home after the procedure</a>.</p><h2>Visiting the clinic before the procedure</h2><p>Your child may have a clinic visit with the interventional radiologist before the procedure. During the visit, you should expect:</p><ul><li>A health assessment to make sure your child is healthy and that it is safe to have <a href="/article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> and to go ahead with the procedure.</li><li>An overview of the procedure, and a review of the consent form with an interventional radiologist.</li><li>Blood work, if needed.</li></ul><h2>Giving consent before the procedure</h2><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, as well as the potential benefits and risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks, and will help you weigh any benefits against the risks. It is important that you understand all of these potential risks and benefits of the angiogram and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h2>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h2><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to make them feel comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive.</p><h2>If your child becomes ill within two days before the procedure</h2><p>It is important that your child is healthy on the day of their procedure. If your child starts to feel unwell or has a fever within two days before the angiogram, let your doctor know. Your child’s procedure may need to be rebooked.</p><h2>Food, drink and medicines before the procedure</h2><ul><li> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Your child’s stomach must be empty</a> before general anaesthetic.</li><li>If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan.</li><li>Your child can take their regular morning medicine with a sip of water two hours before the procedure.</li><li>Medicines such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a>, or <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure unless they have been cleared first by their doctor and the interventional radiologist.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>At SickKids, the interventional radiologists work in the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html">Department of Diagnostic Imaging – Division of Image Guided Therapy (IGT)</a>. You can call the IGT clinic at (416) 813-6054 and speak to the clinic nurse during working hours (8:00 to 15:00) or leave a message with the IGT clinic nurse.</p> <p>For more information on fasting see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p> <p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">Coming for surgery</a>.</p>
Angiographie guidée par l’imageAAngiographie guidée par l’imageAngiogram using image guidanceFrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyArteriesTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-09T05:00:00ZCandice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michelle Cote, BScN, RN;Joao Amaral, MD8.0000000000000061.00000000000001181.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez ce qu’est une angiographie et comment elle se déroule guidée par l’image.</p><h2>Qu’est qu’une angiographie?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Angiographie rénale</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PMD_angiogram_renal_FR.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Une angiographie est une technique effectuée par un radiologiste d’intervention. Il utilise un colorant spécial, appelé agent de contraste, et des rayons X afin d’examiner les artères de votre enfant. Une artère est un vaisseau sanguin qui transporte le sang du cœur vers les tissus dans le corps.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une angiographie se fait à l’aide de l’imagerie médicale afin de créer une carte des artères et de les rendre visibles sous rayons X. Un colorant, l'agent de contraste, est injecté dans l’artère afin d’en exposer la forme.</li> <li>L’angiographie présente normalement peu de risques.</li> <li>On vous demandera de signer un formulaire de consentement.</li> <li>Restez calme, soyez honnête et expliquez à votre enfant à quoi s’attendre. Les enfants sont moins anxieux et ont moins peur quand ils savent ce qui les attend.</li> <li>On administrera probablement une anesthésie générale à votre enfant.</li></ul><h2>Le jour de l’angiographie</h2><p>Rendez-vous à l’hôpital deux heures avant l’heure prévue de l’intervention. Après son admission, le personnel infirmier revêt votre enfant d’une blouse d’hôpital, le pèse et évalue son état de santé. Vous pourrez parler au radiologiste d’intervention et à l’anesthésiste. Celui-ci administre les médicaments qui mettront votre enfant à l’aise.</p><p>Durant l’angiographie, on vous demande d’attendre dans la salle d’attente de la chirurgie.</p><h2>Votre enfant prendra des médicaments antidouleur</h2><p>On administre des médicaments aux enfants pour des soins qui peuvent être effrayants, inconfortables ou douloureux. Dans le cas d’une angiographie, on leur administre une <a href="/article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésie générale</a>. On leur administre aussi un <a href="/article?contentid=3001&language=French">anesthésique local</a> dans l’aine ou dans le bras où le cathéter est inséré afin de s’assurer qu’ils sont à l’aise. À l’occasion, les enfants plus âgés ne reçoivent qu’un anesthésique local pour une angiographie.</p><h2>Déroulement de l’angiographie</h2><p>Le radiologiste d’intervention insère un petit tube, appelé un cathéter, dans une artère de l’aine (la région supérieure de la jambe) ou du bras. Le cathéter est ensuite dirigé vers la région qu'on veut observer. Un colorant spécial, appelé agent de contraste, est alors injecté dans le cathéter. Il s’agit d’un liquide clair et incolore qui aide à exposer les artères afin de les rendre visibles dans une radiographie. Le médecin utilise ensuite des rayons X spéciaux pour obtenir des images des artères.</p><p>On donne parfois des anticoagulants aux enfants durant l’angiographie afin de prévenir la formation de caillots dans l’artère.</p><p>Une fois l'intervention terminée, le cathéter est retiré. Le radiologiste presse sur l’artère de l’aine ou du bras pour faire cesser le saignement.</p><p>Une angiographie peut prendre entre 45 minutes et deux heures, selon la complexité des artères examinées. Cela peut être plus long si d’autres interventions sont effectuées au niveau des artères.</p><h2>Après l'intervention</h2><p>Après l’angiographie, votre enfant sera conduit dans la salle de réveil. Le radiologiste viendra vous faire part du déroulement de l’intervention. Dès que votre enfant se réveillera, le personnel infirmier viendra vous chercher.</p><p>Dans la salle de réveil, votre enfant doit rester couché sur le dos et garder la jambe ou le bras bien droit habituellement pendant six heures. Il se peut qu’il faille presser sur le site de ponction afin d’empêcher tout saignement.</p><h2>Retour à la maison</h2><p>La plupart des enfants rentrent à la maison le jour même, soit environ six heures après l’intervention. Le personnel infirmier vous dira quand l'état de santé de votre enfant sera adéquat pour un retour à la maison. </p><p>Pour en savoir plus sur les soins à donner à votre enfant, lire <a href="/Article?contentid=1222&language=French">Angiogramme – prendre soin de votre enfant après l’intervention</a>.</p><h2>Consultation en clinique avant l’angiographie</h2><p>Il se peut que votre enfant doive consulter le radiologiste d’intervention pour une pré-évaluation. Lors du rendez-vous à la clinique, il faut s’attendre :</p><ul><li>à une évaluation de l’état de santé de votre enfant. On veut établir s’il est indiqué de lui administrer une <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésie générale</a> et de procéder;</li><li>à une explication du déroulement de l’angiographie et à une revue du formulaire de consentement par un radiologiste d’intervention;</li><li>au besoin, à des analyses de sang.</li></ul><h2>Accorder son consentement</h2><p>Avant de procéder, le radiologiste explique le déroulement et la raison-d'être de l'intervention et il expose ses bienfaits et les risques qui y sont associés. Il énonce les mesures prévues pour réduire ces risques et il vous aide à mettre en balance les bienfaits et les risques. Il importe de comprendre tous les risques et les bienfaits possibles de l’angiographie. Assurez-vous d’obtenir des réponses à toutes vos questions. En signant le formulaire de consentement, vous acceptez l’intervention. C'est le parent ou le tuteur légal qui doit signer le formulaire à la place d'un jeune enfant. Sans votre consentement, l'intervention ne peut pas avoir lieu.</p><h2>Pour préparer votre enfant</h2><p>Avant toute intervention médicale, il importe de parler à votre enfant de ce qui va se passer. Utilisez des mots qu'il peut comprendre. Dites-lui qu’il recevra des médicaments qui le mettront à l’aise pendant l’intervention.</p><p>Les enfants sont moins anxieux et ont moins peur quand ils savent ce qui les attend. Les enfants sont aussi moins inquiets quand leurs parents sont calmes et démontrent leur soutien.</p><h2>Si votre enfant tombe malade dans les deux jours précédant l’angiographie</h2><p>Il est important que votre enfant soit en bonne santé le jour de l’angiographie. S’il se sent mal ou a une fièvre dans les deux jours qui la précèdent, prévenez votre médecin. Il se peut que l'intervention doive être reportée.</p><h2>Boire, manger et prendre des médicaments</h2><ul><li>L'<a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">estomac de votre enfant </a> (en anglais) doit être vide avant une sédation ou une anesthésie générale.</li><li>Si votre enfant a des besoins particuliers pendant le jeûne, adressez-vous à votre médecin.</li><li>Votre enfant peut prendre ses médicaments habituels du matin avec une gorgée d’eau deux heures avant l’intervention.</li><li>Les médicaments tels que l’<a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=French">acide acétylsalicylique (AAS)</a>, le <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=French">naproxen</a>, l'<a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=French">ibuprofène</a>, le <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=French">warfarine</a>, ou l'<a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=French">énoxaparine</a> peuvent augmenter le risque de saignement. Ne pas administrer ces médicaments à votre enfant avant l’intervention sans l’autorisation de son médecin et du radiologiste d’intervention.</li></ul><h2>À l'hôpital SickKids</h2> <p>À l'hôpital SickKids, les radiologistes d’intervention sont affectés au <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html">Service d’imagerie diagnostique à la Clinique de la thérapie guidée par image </a>(en anglais). Pour joindre la clinique, faire le 416-813-6504. Vous pouvez parler au personnel durant les heures de travail, entre 8 h et 15 h, ou encore lui demander de transmettre un message.</p> <p>Pour en savoir plus sur le jeûne, lire la section portant sur <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">boire et manger avant une chirurgie</a> (en anglais).</p> <p>Pour savoir comment bien préparer votre enfant, lire la section portant sur <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">se préparer à une chirurgie​ </a> (en anglais).</p>

 

 

Angiogram using image guidance2440.00000000000Angiogram using image guidanceAngiogram using image guidanceAEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyArteriesTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-09T05:00:00ZCandice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michelle Cote, BScN, RN;Joao Amaral, MD8.0000000000000061.00000000000001181.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn what an angiogram is and how it is done using image guidance.</p><h2>What is an angiogram?</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Kidney angiogram</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PMD_angiogram_renal_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>An angiogram is a procedure that uses a special dye, called contrast, and X-rays to see the arteries inside your child’s body. An artery is a blood vessel, which carries blood away from the heart to the tissues in the body. Angiograms are done by interventional radiologists.</p><h2>Reasons for an angiogram</h2> <ul> <li>To help doctors identify narrowed, enlarged and blocked blood vessels.</li> <li>To determine if there is blood leaking out of the vessels and into other parts of the body.</li> <li>To help doctors diagnose different diseases that involve blood vessels.</li> </ul><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>An angiogram uses medical imaging to create a map of the arteries so they can be seen on an X-ray. Contrast dye is injected through an artery to outline the artery shape.</li> <li>Angiograms are usually low-risk procedures.</li> <li>You will be asked to sign a consent form before the procedure.</li> <li>Be calm, honest and tell your child what to expect. Children feel less nervous and scared when they are given information about what will happen to them.</li> <li>Your child will most likely be given a general anaesthetic.</li> </ul><h2>Results</h2> <p>Your referring doctor will receive the results of your child’s angiogram. You will need to make an appointment with them to discuss the results.</p><h2>On the day of the angiogram</h2><p>Arrive at the hospital two hours before the planned time of your child’s procedure. Once you are checked in, your child will be dressed in a hospital gown, weighed and assessed by a nurse. You will also be able to speak to the interventional radiologist who will be doing the angiogram, and the anesthetist who will be giving your child medication to make them comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>During the angiogram, you will be asked to wait in the surgical waiting area.</p><h2>Your child will have medicine for pain</h2><p>Children are given medicine for treatments that may be frightening, uncomfortable or painful. For angiograms, most children are given <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> and <a href="/article?contentid=3001&language=English">local anaesthesia</a> at the groin or arm where the catheter is inserted to make sure they are comfortable. Occasionally, in older children, angiograms are done with local anesthesia only.</p><h2>How an angiogram is done</h2><p>The interventional radiologist will insert a tiny tube, called a catheter, into an artery in the groin (the area at the top of the leg) or in the arm. The catheter is then directed into the area that requires imaging. Next, a special dye, called contrast, is injected into the catheter. The dye is a clear, colourless liquid that helps to outline the arteries so they will show up on an X-ray. The doctor then uses X-rays to take pictures of the arteries.</p><p>Some children will be given blood thinners during the procedure to help keep the artery from clotting (blocking).</p><p>When the procedure is finished, the catheter is taken out of the artery. The radiologist presses on the artery in the groin or arm to stop any bleeding.</p><p>An angiogram can take from 45 minutes to two hours, depending on how complex the arteries being examined are. It can also take longer if any additional treatments are done to the arteries.</p><h2>After the angiogram</h2><p>Once the angiogram is complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. As soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you.</p><p>Your child should remain on their back with their leg or arm kept straight while in the recovery area and for six hours after the procedure. Some pressure may be applied at the insertion site in the groin or arm to prevent further bleeding.</p><h2>Going home</h2><p>In most cases, children go home the same day as the procedure. This usually occurs about six hours after the procedure. Your child’s nurse will let you know when they are well enough to go home.</p><p>For more details on how to care for your child after an angiogram, please see <a href="/Article?contentid=1222&language=English">Angiogram: Caring for your child at home after the procedure</a>.</p><h2>Visiting the clinic before the procedure</h2><p>Your child may have a clinic visit with the interventional radiologist before the procedure. During the visit, you should expect:</p><ul><li>A health assessment to make sure your child is healthy and that it is safe to have <a href="/article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> and to go ahead with the procedure.</li><li>An overview of the procedure, and a review of the consent form with an interventional radiologist.</li><li>Blood work, if needed.</li></ul><h2>Giving consent before the procedure</h2><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, as well as the potential benefits and risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks, and will help you weigh any benefits against the risks. It is important that you understand all of these potential risks and benefits of the angiogram and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h2>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h2><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to make them feel comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive.</p><h2>If your child becomes ill within two days before the procedure</h2><p>It is important that your child is healthy on the day of their procedure. If your child starts to feel unwell or has a fever within two days before the angiogram, let your doctor know. Your child’s procedure may need to be rebooked.</p><h2>Food, drink and medicines before the procedure</h2><ul><li> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Your child’s stomach must be empty</a> before general anaesthetic.</li><li>If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan.</li><li>Your child can take their regular morning medicine with a sip of water two hours before the procedure.</li><li>Medicines such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a>, or <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure unless they have been cleared first by their doctor and the interventional radiologist.</li></ul><h2>Risks of an angiogram</h2> <p>Angiograms are usually low-risk procedures. Major complications are extremely rare. The risk may increase depending on your child’s condition, age and health.</p> <p>The risks of an angiogram include:</p> <ul> <li>pain, bruising or bleeding in the groin or arm where the catheter was inserted</li> <li>infection</li> <li>a bulge or weakness in the artery wall (pseudoaneurysm)</li> <li>poor circulation to the leg or arm where the catheter was inserted</li> <li>clotting (blockage) of the artery</li> <li>damage to the arteries examined (dissection, rupture)</li> <li>bleeding inside the body in the area examined</li> <li>allergy to X-ray dye or contrast</li> <li>stroke (very, very rare)</li> </ul><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>At SickKids, the interventional radiologists work in the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html">Department of Diagnostic Imaging – Division of Image Guided Therapy (IGT)</a>. You can call the IGT clinic at (416) 813-6054 and speak to the clinic nurse during working hours (8:00 to 15:00) or leave a message with the IGT clinic nurse.</p> <p>For more information on fasting see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p> <p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">Coming for surgery</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PMD_angiogram_renal_EN.jpgAngiogram using image guidanceFalse

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