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ColonoscopyCColonoscopyColonoscopyEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Large Intestine/ColonLarge intestine;RectumTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-11-16T05:00:00ZHolly Norgrove, RN, BScN;Simon Ling, MBChB, MRCP(UK)​10.000000000000056.00000000000001284.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Your child needs a colonoscopy. Learn what a colonoscopy is, how to prepare and what to expect.</p><h2>What is a colonoscopy?</h2> <p>A colonoscopy is a procedure that allows doctors to see the lower part of your child’s digestive system. This includes the rectum and large intestine (the colon).</p> <h2>Why is a colonoscopy done?</h2> <p>A colonoscopy allows doctors to investigate symptoms (such as bloody stool, anemia or abdominal pain) or check on existing conditions (such as <a href="/Article?contentid=924&language=English">ulcerative colitis</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=923&language=English">Crohn’s disease</a>). A colonoscopy can also be done to enable the removal of polyps or to treat bleeding.</p><h2>Key Points</h2> <ul> <li>A colonoscopy uses a camera to see the lower part of the digestive system to investigate symptoms or check on existing conditions.</li> <li>Your child will need to follow a special diet starting seven days before their procedure and take two doses of bowel prep medication.</li> <li>A colonoscopy is usually a low risk procedure.</li> <li>Your child will be given a general anaesthetic.</li> </ul><h2>On the day of the colonoscopy</h2><p>Arrive at the hospital early in the morning to register. After your child is registered they will receive an identification band and be shown to their room. It is important to bring your child’s health card or insurance information when you register.</p><p>The nurse will assess your child to be sure they are healthy enough for the test to be completed and the fasting rules have been met. Your child will then take another dose of bowel-prep medication, as described above. At the time of the procedure, your child will be taken to the procedure room or operating room for the colonoscopy. Your child will have an intravenous (IV) inserted once they are asleep.</p><h2>How is a colonoscopy done?</h2><p>During a colonoscopy, a thin flexible tube with a camera on the end is inserted through the anus and up into the rectum and large intestine. The doctor will be look for changes in how the bowel (the inside of the intestine) looks, such as bleeding, inflammation or polyps. They will also collect small samples of tissue (called biopsies) for testing.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">Colonoscopy</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_colonoscopy_EN.jpg" alt="Colonscope inserted through anus into rectum and large intestine (colon)" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">During</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> a colonoscopy, a thin flexible tube with a camera on the end is inserted through the anus and up into the rectum to look at the large intestine (colon).</figcaption> </figure> <p>All children getting a colonoscopy will receive <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This means that your child will be given a medication so they will sleep through the procedure. If there is a family history of <a>malignant hyperthermia</a> or other reactions to anaesthesia, please let your nurse know before the procedure. General anaesthetics are safe, and are given by a specially trained doctor called an anaesthesiologist. The anaesthesiologist will meet with you before the procedure to explain how the anaesthetic is given and to discuss any possible complications.</p><h2>After the colonoscopy</h2> <p>When the colonoscopy is complete, the doctor will speak with you regarding what they saw. The full results of the biopsies should be available a few weeks after the procedure. Expect to be at the hospital for at least two hours after the procedure to be sure your child wakes up safely.</p><h2>Preparing for your colonoscopy</h2> <p>Your child must follow strict eating and drinking rules before the procedure. Your child’s stomach must be empty before a general anaesthetic. If the eating and drinking instructions are not followed correctly, for the safety of your child, the procedure may be cancelled when you get to the hospital. If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan. If your child is on daily medications, make a plan with your doctor about which medications to take on the day of procedure and when to take them.</p> <p>Please reschedule or cancel your appointment if your child:</p> <ul> <li>Has a cough, cold, nasal congestion, vomiting or diarrhea, or if they are generally unwell</li> <li>Has been sick with, or exposed to, chicken pox or tuberculosis in the past four weeks.</li> </ul> <p>To be able to see the bowels properly during the colonoscopy, your child’s bowels need to be cleared of all stool. This is called “bowel prep”.</p> <p>Bowel prep includes:</p> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>Time before the procedure</th><th>Instructions</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>7 days before</td> <td><p>Your child should stop taking iron supplements. Iron sticks to the bowel wall and may interfere with visibility.</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>3 days before</td> <td><p>Your child should start a low residue/low fibre diet*</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 day before</td> <td><p>Your child may have a light breakfast and light lunch** around noon. <strong>This will be their last meal until after the test</strong>.</p> <p>Your child should only drink clear fluids.***</p> <p>At 4 p.m., give your child their first dose of bowel-prep medication (e.g., PicoSalax) as recommended by your health-care provider.</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Day of the procedure</td> <td><p>Your child will take a second dose of bowel-prep medication once they arrive at the hospital for their colonoscopy. At this point, your child must walk around and move as much as possible. They should also drink plenty of clear fluids until 3 hours before the colonoscopy at which they should stop drinking clear fluids.</p> <p>Your child’s bowel is clear when they have passed several watery stools that are clear or yellow. If the bowel-prep medication has not cleared the stools, your child may need to receive an enema.</p></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>*Foods to choose – low residue/low fiber diet: White bread, white pasta, white rice, plain cereal and crackers, skinless potatoes, chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, applesauce, melons, canned fruits (without the skin), ripe bananas, well-cooked vegetables, mayonnaise, mustard and plain desserts (vanilla wafers, sherbet, animal crackers).</p> <p>*Foods that are not low residue/low fiber: Whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, brown or wild rice, granola, buckwheat and other high-fibre grains, tough meats (such as red meat), raw fruits with the skin, prunes and prune juice, raisins, berries, raw vegetables, nuts, seeds and popcorn.</p> <p>**Examples of light breakfast/lunch: Any clear fluids, toast made with white bread (without butter), eggs (two maximum) scrambled without milk, 1.5 cups clear soup (not creamed) and 3 to 4 soda crackers, 2 ounces skinless turkey, chicken or fish and one medium potato without the skin.</p> <p>***Examples of clear fluids: Drinks that are clear (NO red, blue or purple drinks) such as water, clear juices (apple, white grape), Pedialyte, Enfalyte, crystal/powder drinks), ginger alepopsicles and freezies. If you can see through it then it is a clear fluid.</p> <p>***Fluids to avoid: Homemade juices, juices with pulp (such as orange juice), cider, milk, formula and Jell-O.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>SickKids will call to notify you of your child’s appointment details, as well as where and when to arrive. Colonoscopy procedures are usually performed on 4C, in the main hospital, on the 4th floor of the atrium (use the main elevators). Some cases are performed in the operating room, in the main hospital, on the 2nd floor of the atrium. Your doctor will decide where the colonoscopy will take place.</p> <p>To change or cancel your appointment on 4C, please contact the clinic at 416-813-6583. For cases in the operating room, the procedure room nurses at 416-813-7004.</p> <p>Sick Kids policy allows up to two adults to accompany a child for their procedure. The exception is a breastfeeding infant. If you have other children, please ensure you have made arrangements to have them stay at home on the day of the procedure.</p> <p>For more information on fasting see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html" target="_blank">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p> <p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html" target="_blank">Coming for surgery</a>.</p> <p>For information about getting to the hospital see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Getting-to-SickKids/index.html" target="_blank">Getting to SickKids</a>.</p><h2>Resources</h2> <p>Video on colonoscopy: <a href="http://www.cdhf.ca/en/solving-the-mystery-of-endoscopy" target="_blank">http://www.cdhf.ca/en/solving-the-mystery-of-endoscopy</a></p>
ColoscopieCColoscopieColonoscopyFrenchGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Large Intestine/ColonLarge intestine;RectumTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-11-16T05:00:00ZHolly Norgrove, RN, BScN;Simon Ling, MBChB, MRCP(UK)​10.000000000000056.00000000000001284.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Votre enfant a besoin d’une coloscopie. Apprenez en quoi consiste une coloscopie, comment s’y préparer et à quoi s’attendre.</p><h2>​​Qu’est-ce qu’une coloscopie?</h2> <p>Une coloscopie est une procédure qui permet aux médecins d'examiner visuellement la partie inférieure du système digestif, dont le rectum et le gros intestin (le côlon).</p> <h2>Pourquoi procéder à une coloscopie?</h2> <p>Une coloscopie permet aux médecins d’explorer des symptômes (tels que les selles sanglantes, l’anémie et les douleurs abdominales) ou encore de vérifier des troubles existants (tels que la <a href="/Article?contentid=924&language=French">colite ulcéreuse</a> et la <a href="/Article?contentid=923&language=French">maladie de Crohn</a>). Une coloscopie permet aussi d’enlever des polypes et de traiter des saignements.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Pendant une coloscopie, une caméra permet d'examiner visuellement la partie inférieure du système digestif pour explorer des symptômes ou vérifier des troubles existants.</li> <li>Votre enfant devra adopter un régime spécial sept jours avant la procédure et prendre deux doses de préparation intestinale médicamentée.</li> <li>La coloscopie est en général une procédure à faible risque.</li> <li>Chez les enfants, la coloscopie est réalisée sous anesthésie générale.</li></ul> <h2>Le jour de la procédure</h2><p>Le personnel infirmier évaluera votre enfant pour s'assurer qu'il est en assez bonne santé pour subir la procédure prévue et que les règles du jeûne ont été respectées. Votre enfant prendra ensuite une autre dose de préparation intestinale, tel que décrit ci-dessus. Quand viendra le moment de la coloscopie, votre enfant sera amené dans la salle de procédure ou au bloc opératoire. Une fois qu’il sera endormi, on lui insérera une intraveineuse (IV). </p><h2>Comment la coloscopie est-elle réalisée?</h2><p>Pendant la procédure, un mince tube flexible muni d’une caméra à l'extrémité est introduit dans l’anus jusqu’en haut du rectum et du gros intestin. En plus d'examiner la paroi interne du côlon pour détecter toute anomalie – saignements, inflammation ou polypes -, le médecin prélève de petits échantillons de tissu (c.-à-d. une biopsie) pour faire l’analyse de ces anomalies.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Coloscopie</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_colonoscopy_FR.jpg" alt="Un coloscope inséré dans l’anus jusqu’en haut du rectum et dans le gros intestin" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Pendant la coloscopie, un mince tube flexible muni d’une caméra à l'extrémité est introduit par l’anus jusqu’en haut du rectum afin d’examiner le gros intestin (côlon).</figcaption> </figure> <p>Chez les enfants, la coloscopie est réalisée sous <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésie générale</a>. On administre à votre enfant un médicament pour qu’il dorme pendant toute la procédure. S'il y a des antécédents familiaux d'<a href="/Article?contentid=2549&language=French">hyperthermie</a><span> maligne​</span> ou d'autres réactions à l'anesthésie, veuillez en informer le personnel infirmier avant la procédure. Les anesthésiques généraux sont sans danger et sont administrés par un anesthésiste ayant une formation spécialisée.</p><p>L’anesthésiste vous rencontrera avant la procédure pour vous expliquer comment sera administré l’anesthésique et pour discuter des complications possibles.</p><h2>Après la coloscopie</h2> <p>Lorsque la coloscopie sera terminée, le médecin partagera avec vous ce qu’il a observé. Les résultats complets de la biopsie seront disponibles quelques semaines après la procédure. Prévoyez d’être à l'hôpital pendant au moins deux heures après l'intervention pour vous assurer que votre enfant se réveille en toute sécurité.</p><h2>Comment se préparer à la coloscopie</h2> <p>Votre enfant doit suivre des règles strictes à propos de ce qu’il peut manger et boire avant la procédure. L’estomac de votre enfant doit être vide avant l’anesthésie générale. Si les instructions ne sont pas suivies correctement, la procédure peut être annulée lorsque vous arrivez à l'hôpital, et ce, pour assurer la sécurité de votre enfant. Si votre enfant a des besoins alimentaires particuliers durant la période de jeune, demandez à votre médecin de dresser un plan. S’il prend quotidiennement des médicaments, demandez au médecin de dresser un plan au sujet des médicaments à prendre le jour de la procédure et quand les prendre.</p> <p>Veuillez reporter ou annuler le rendez-vous si votre enfant :</p> <ul><li>a une toux, un rhume, une congestion nasale, des vomissements ou la diarrhée, ou encore s’il ne se sent pas bien;</li> <li>a contracté la varicelle ou la tuberculose ou a été exposé à ces maladies au cours des quatre dernières semaines.</li></ul> <p>Afin de pouvoir bien examiner l’intestin durant la coloscopie, il doit être vidé de selles. Il faut faire le nettoyage de l’intestin.</p> <p>Voici comment nettoyer l’intestin :</p> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>N<sup>bre</sup> de jours avant la procédure</th><th>Directives</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>7 jours avant</td> <td><p>Votre enfant doit cesser de prendre des suppléments de fer, car le fer colle à la paroi de l'intestin et peut gêner la visibilité.</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>3 jours avant</td> <td><p>Votre enfant doit commencer un régime faible en résidus et en fibres *.</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 jour avant</td> <td><p>Votre enfant peut prendre un léger petit-déjeuner et un léger déjeuner** vers midi. <strong>Il s’agit du dernier repas avant l’examen.</strong></p> <p>Votre enfant ne devrait boire que des liquides clairs. *** </p> <p>À 16 h, il faut donner à votre enfant la première dose de la préparation intestinale médicamentée (p. ex. PicoSalax) tel que recommandé par votre fournisseur de soins de santé.</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Jour de la procédure</td> <td><p>Votre enfant doit prendre une deuxième dose de la préparation intestinale dès son arrivée à l’hôpital. À ce stade, il doit se déplacer et bouger autant que possible, tout en buvant beaucoup de liquides clairs jusqu'à 3 heures avant la coloscopie. Il doit alors cesser de boire des liquides clairs.</p> <p>L'intestin de votre enfant est vide lorsqu'il a passé plusieurs selles aqueuses qui sont claires ou jaunes. Si la préparation intestinale n’a pas vidé l’intestin de selles, votre enfant pourrait avoir un lavement.</p></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>*Aliments à choisir - un régime faible en résidus et en fibres : pain blanc, pâtes blanches, riz blanc, céréales et craquelins secs, pommes de terre sans pelure, poulet, dinde, poisson, œufs, compote de pommes, melons, fruits en conserve (sans pelure), bananes mûres, légumes bien cuits, mayonnaise, moutarde et desserts sans garniture (gaufrettes à la vanille, sorbet, craquelins en forme d’animaux).</p> <p>*Aliments à éviter pour un régime faible en résidus et en fibres : pain de blé entier, pâtes de blé entier, riz brun ou sauvage, granola, sarrasin et autres grains riches en fibres, viandes dures (comme la viande rouge), fruits crus avec pelure, pruneaux et jus de pruneaux, raisins secs, baies, légumes crus, noix, graines et pop-corn.</p> <p>**Exemples de petit déjeuner ou de déjeuner léger : liquides clairs de toutes sortes, pain blanc grillé (sans beurre), œufs (maximum 2) brouillés sans lait, 1,5 tasse de bouillon clair (pas de potage) et de 3 à 4 biscuits soda, 2 onces de dinde ou de poulet sans peau ou encore de poisson et 1 pomme de terre moyenne sans pelure.</p> <p>*** Exemples de liquides clairs : boissons qui sont transparentes (AUCUNE boisson de couleurs rouge, bleue ou violette), telles que eau, jus de fruits clairs (de pomme ou de raisin blanc), Pedialyte, Enfalyte, boissons en poudre et en cristaux, ginger ale, sucettes et bâtons glacés.</p> <p>*** À éviter : jus de fruits faits maison, jus de fruits avec pulpe (comme le jus d’orange), cidre, lait, préparation maternisée, Jello.</p>​​<h2>À l'hôpital Sick Kids</h2> <p>L’hôpital vous appellera pour vous informer des détails des rendez-vous de votre enfant et vous indiquera où et quand vous présenter. Les procédures d'endoscopie digestive haute sont généralement effectuées dans l’unité 4C, située dans l'hôpital principal, au 4e étage de l'Atrium (utiliser les ascenseurs principaux). Certaines de ces procédures sont réalisées dans le bloc opératoire de l'hôpital principal, situé au 2e étage de l'Atrium. </p> <p>Votre médecin décidera où se déroulera l'endoscopie.</p> <p>Pour modifier ou annuler un rendez-vous au 4C, veuillez composer le 416 813-6583. Pour les procédures en salle d'opération, veuillez contacter le personnel infirmier responsable des procédures au 416 813-7004.</p> <p>La politique de l’hôpital permet qu’au plus deux adultes accompagnent un enfant qui subit une procédure. On fait exception pour un bébé allaité au sein. Si vous avez d'autres enfants, veuillez vous assurer de prendre des arrangements pour les faire garder à la maison le jour de la procédure.</p> <p>Pour des précisions au sujet du jeûne avant la chirurgie, consultez <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Eating and drinking before surgery</a> (en anglais).</p> <p>Pour de plus amples renseignements au sujet de la procédure, consulter <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">Coming for surgery</a> (en anglais).</p> <p>Pour des instructions sur comment se rendre à l'hôpital Sick Kids, consultez <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Getting-to-SickKids/index.html">Getting to SickKids​</a> (en anglais).</p> <h2>Ressources</h2> <p>Vidéo sur la coloscopie : <a href="http://www.cdhf.ca/en/solving-the-mystery-of-endoscopy">http://www.cdhf.ca/en/solving-the-mystery-of-endoscopy</a></p>

 

 

Colonoscopy2446.00000000000ColonoscopyColonoscopyCEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Large Intestine/ColonLarge intestine;RectumTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-11-16T05:00:00ZHolly Norgrove, RN, BScN;Simon Ling, MBChB, MRCP(UK)​10.000000000000056.00000000000001284.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Your child needs a colonoscopy. Learn what a colonoscopy is, how to prepare and what to expect.</p><h2>What is a colonoscopy?</h2> <p>A colonoscopy is a procedure that allows doctors to see the lower part of your child’s digestive system. This includes the rectum and large intestine (the colon).</p> <h2>Why is a colonoscopy done?</h2> <p>A colonoscopy allows doctors to investigate symptoms (such as bloody stool, anemia or abdominal pain) or check on existing conditions (such as <a href="/Article?contentid=924&language=English">ulcerative colitis</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=923&language=English">Crohn’s disease</a>). A colonoscopy can also be done to enable the removal of polyps or to treat bleeding.</p><h2>Key Points</h2> <ul> <li>A colonoscopy uses a camera to see the lower part of the digestive system to investigate symptoms or check on existing conditions.</li> <li>Your child will need to follow a special diet starting seven days before their procedure and take two doses of bowel prep medication.</li> <li>A colonoscopy is usually a low risk procedure.</li> <li>Your child will be given a general anaesthetic.</li> </ul><h2>Follow-up</h2> <p>Please contact your clinic nurse if you have not received the results within three weeks of the procedure.</p><h2>On the day of the colonoscopy</h2><p>Arrive at the hospital early in the morning to register. After your child is registered they will receive an identification band and be shown to their room. It is important to bring your child’s health card or insurance information when you register.</p><p>The nurse will assess your child to be sure they are healthy enough for the test to be completed and the fasting rules have been met. Your child will then take another dose of bowel-prep medication, as described above. At the time of the procedure, your child will be taken to the procedure room or operating room for the colonoscopy. Your child will have an intravenous (IV) inserted once they are asleep.</p><h2>How is a colonoscopy done?</h2><p>During a colonoscopy, a thin flexible tube with a camera on the end is inserted through the anus and up into the rectum and large intestine. The doctor will be look for changes in how the bowel (the inside of the intestine) looks, such as bleeding, inflammation or polyps. They will also collect small samples of tissue (called biopsies) for testing.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">Colonoscopy</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_colonoscopy_EN.jpg" alt="Colonscope inserted through anus into rectum and large intestine (colon)" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">During</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> a colonoscopy, a thin flexible tube with a camera on the end is inserted through the anus and up into the rectum to look at the large intestine (colon).</figcaption> </figure> <p>All children getting a colonoscopy will receive <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This means that your child will be given a medication so they will sleep through the procedure. If there is a family history of <a>malignant hyperthermia</a> or other reactions to anaesthesia, please let your nurse know before the procedure. General anaesthetics are safe, and are given by a specially trained doctor called an anaesthesiologist. The anaesthesiologist will meet with you before the procedure to explain how the anaesthetic is given and to discuss any possible complications.</p><h2>After the colonoscopy</h2> <p>When the colonoscopy is complete, the doctor will speak with you regarding what they saw. The full results of the biopsies should be available a few weeks after the procedure. Expect to be at the hospital for at least two hours after the procedure to be sure your child wakes up safely.</p><h2>Preparing for your colonoscopy</h2> <p>Your child must follow strict eating and drinking rules before the procedure. Your child’s stomach must be empty before a general anaesthetic. If the eating and drinking instructions are not followed correctly, for the safety of your child, the procedure may be cancelled when you get to the hospital. If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan. If your child is on daily medications, make a plan with your doctor about which medications to take on the day of procedure and when to take them.</p> <p>Please reschedule or cancel your appointment if your child:</p> <ul> <li>Has a cough, cold, nasal congestion, vomiting or diarrhea, or if they are generally unwell</li> <li>Has been sick with, or exposed to, chicken pox or tuberculosis in the past four weeks.</li> </ul> <p>To be able to see the bowels properly during the colonoscopy, your child’s bowels need to be cleared of all stool. This is called “bowel prep”.</p> <p>Bowel prep includes:</p> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>Time before the procedure</th><th>Instructions</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>7 days before</td> <td><p>Your child should stop taking iron supplements. Iron sticks to the bowel wall and may interfere with visibility.</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>3 days before</td> <td><p>Your child should start a low residue/low fibre diet*</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 day before</td> <td><p>Your child may have a light breakfast and light lunch** around noon. <strong>This will be their last meal until after the test</strong>.</p> <p>Your child should only drink clear fluids.***</p> <p>At 4 p.m., give your child their first dose of bowel-prep medication (e.g., PicoSalax) as recommended by your health-care provider.</p></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Day of the procedure</td> <td><p>Your child will take a second dose of bowel-prep medication once they arrive at the hospital for their colonoscopy. At this point, your child must walk around and move as much as possible. They should also drink plenty of clear fluids until 3 hours before the colonoscopy at which they should stop drinking clear fluids.</p> <p>Your child’s bowel is clear when they have passed several watery stools that are clear or yellow. If the bowel-prep medication has not cleared the stools, your child may need to receive an enema.</p></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>*Foods to choose – low residue/low fiber diet: White bread, white pasta, white rice, plain cereal and crackers, skinless potatoes, chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, applesauce, melons, canned fruits (without the skin), ripe bananas, well-cooked vegetables, mayonnaise, mustard and plain desserts (vanilla wafers, sherbet, animal crackers).</p> <p>*Foods that are not low residue/low fiber: Whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, brown or wild rice, granola, buckwheat and other high-fibre grains, tough meats (such as red meat), raw fruits with the skin, prunes and prune juice, raisins, berries, raw vegetables, nuts, seeds and popcorn.</p> <p>**Examples of light breakfast/lunch: Any clear fluids, toast made with white bread (without butter), eggs (two maximum) scrambled without milk, 1.5 cups clear soup (not creamed) and 3 to 4 soda crackers, 2 ounces skinless turkey, chicken or fish and one medium potato without the skin.</p> <p>***Examples of clear fluids: Drinks that are clear (NO red, blue or purple drinks) such as water, clear juices (apple, white grape), Pedialyte, Enfalyte, crystal/powder drinks), ginger alepopsicles and freezies. If you can see through it then it is a clear fluid.</p> <p>***Fluids to avoid: Homemade juices, juices with pulp (such as orange juice), cider, milk, formula and Jell-O.</p><h2>Risks of a colonoscopy</h2> <p>Colonoscopy is a safe, low-risk procedure. However, you may experience the following side effects:</p> <ul> <li>Small drops of blood in the stool for one to two days after the procedure</li> <li>Nausea, vomiting or bloating for a few hours after the procedure</li> <li>Irritation of the rectum</li> </ul> <p>Very rarely, the following complications may occur:</p> <ul> <li>Infection, in which case your child will be given antibiotics.</li> <li>Heavy bleeding from the colon, which can often be treated immediately at the time of the colonoscopy, but which may require admission to hospital.</li> <li>Tearing or perforation, in which a hole is caused in the wall of the colon. This may require surgery to fix. This is very rare, occurring in approximately one child out of 1000 children who have a colonoscopy.</li> </ul> <p>If your child is at a high risk of infection, they may be given antibiotics preventively before the colonoscopy takes place. However, the likelihood of any of these complications occurring is small. If any of these complications occur, they are usually recognized before your child is discharged home.</p> <p>You should contact your doctor or visit the Emergency Department if you notice these signs and symptoms after the procedure:</p> <ul> <li>fever and/or chills</li> <li>severe pain in the abdomen</li> <li>bloody stools or black stools</li> </ul><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>SickKids will call to notify you of your child’s appointment details, as well as where and when to arrive. Colonoscopy procedures are usually performed on 4C, in the main hospital, on the 4th floor of the atrium (use the main elevators). Some cases are performed in the operating room, in the main hospital, on the 2nd floor of the atrium. Your doctor will decide where the colonoscopy will take place.</p> <p>To change or cancel your appointment on 4C, please contact the clinic at 416-813-6583. For cases in the operating room, the procedure room nurses at 416-813-7004.</p> <p>Sick Kids policy allows up to two adults to accompany a child for their procedure. The exception is a breastfeeding infant. If you have other children, please ensure you have made arrangements to have them stay at home on the day of the procedure.</p> <p>For more information on fasting see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html" target="_blank">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p> <p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html" target="_blank">Coming for surgery</a>.</p> <p>For information about getting to the hospital see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Getting-to-SickKids/index.html" target="_blank">Getting to SickKids</a>.</p><h2>Resources</h2> <p>Video on colonoscopy: <a href="http://www.cdhf.ca/en/solving-the-mystery-of-endoscopy" target="_blank">http://www.cdhf.ca/en/solving-the-mystery-of-endoscopy</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_colonoscopy_EN.jpgColonoscopyFalse

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