Growth and developmentGGrowth and developmentGrowth and developmentEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDESanjukta Basak, MSc, MD CM, FRCPCRuth Slater, PhD, C. PsychJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out what it's like for a child with diabetes to adjust to different challenges of managing the condition at different ages and stages.</p><p>Each age and stage of life has a <a href="http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/">different set of challenges</a>. A chronic disorder brings additional challenges. It might seem that as soon as your family has found ways to negotiate the rocky course of one stage of development, the next stage has arrived.</p> <p>For example, parenting an infant or toddler can be much different from parenting a school-aged child. Likewise, being a teenager with <a>diabetes</a> is different from being nine or 10 years old and living with the disorder. As teenagers reach adulthood, they are faced with new issues that further affect their diabetes care.</p> <p>Your family and the <a href="/Article?contentid=2511&language=English">diabetes team​</a> can both help smooth your child’s road to adulthood by helping your child develop a strong sense of identity and self-worth and empowering them to take responsibility for their diabetes management.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Diabetes care will change depending on your child's age and lifestyle. Both of these things must be factored in to a diabetes management plan.</li></ul>
Croissance et développementCCroissance et développementGrowth and developmentFrenchEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDESanjukta Basak, MSc, MD CM, FRCPCRuth Slater, PhD, C. PsychJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez comment votre enfant s’adapte aux différents défis associés à son diabète, selon son âge et le stade de sa maladie.<br></p><p>Chaque âge et chaque étape de la vie comportent une <a href="http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/">série de défis différents</a>. Une maladie chronique entraîne un plus grand nombre de défis. Il pourrait sembler que, dès que votre famille a trouvé des manières de négocier le cours houleux d’une étape du développement, l’étape suivante est arrivée.</p> <p>Par exemple, le rôle de parent d’un nourrisson ou d’un tout-petit peut être très différent de celui de parents d’un enfant d’âge scolaire. De même, un adolescent atteint du <a>diabète</a> ne vivra pas la maladie de la même manière qu’un enfant de neuf ou dix ans. Lorsque les adolescents atteignent l’âge adulte, ils sont confrontés à de nouveaux défis qui compromettent davantage leurs soins du diabète.</p> <p>Votre famille et l’<a>équipe</a><span> de soins de santé du diabète​</span> peuvent contribuer à aplanir le chemin de votre enfant vers l’âge adulte en aidant celui-ci à développer un sentiment profond d’identité et d’estime de soi et en lui donnant les moyens de prendre ses responsabilités dans la prise en charge de son diabète.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Le traitement du diabète sera adapté à l’âge de votre enfant et à son mode de vie. Ces deux facteurs doivent être pris en compte dans le plan de gestion du diabète.</li></ul>

 

 

Growth and development2512.00000000000Growth and developmentGrowth and developmentGEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDESanjukta Basak, MSc, MD CM, FRCPCRuth Slater, PhD, C. PsychJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out what it's like for a child with diabetes to adjust to different challenges of managing the condition at different ages and stages.</p><p>Each age and stage of life has a <a href="http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/">different set of challenges</a>. A chronic disorder brings additional challenges. It might seem that as soon as your family has found ways to negotiate the rocky course of one stage of development, the next stage has arrived.</p> <p>For example, parenting an infant or toddler can be much different from parenting a school-aged child. Likewise, being a teenager with <a>diabetes</a> is different from being nine or 10 years old and living with the disorder. As teenagers reach adulthood, they are faced with new issues that further affect their diabetes care.</p> <p>Your family and the <a href="/Article?contentid=2511&language=English">diabetes team​</a> can both help smooth your child’s road to adulthood by helping your child develop a strong sense of identity and self-worth and empowering them to take responsibility for their diabetes management.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Diabetes care will change depending on your child's age and lifestyle. Both of these things must be factored in to a diabetes management plan.</li></ul><figure class="asset-right"><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/growth_and_development.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <h2>Lisa’s story: Adjusting to new realities</h2><p>Lisa is a typical 12-year-old—being with friends is the most important thing in her life. She and three other girls spend amost every waking hour together, talking about boys and trying new hair styles. Lisa likes her friends and cares what they think. They know she has diabetes but Lisa wants them to know she can do everything they can. This is a good attitude on Lisa’s part, but it could get her in trouble.</p><p>One day at school Lisa was so caught up in hanging out with her friends that she forgot she needed to go home for her afternoon snack. By 4:30 she felt shaky, hungry and a little dizzy. Fortunately one of her friends had a little candy that she gave Lisa, and after a few minutes, Lisa felt better.</p><p>Lisa’s mom was upset when she found out, but she understood Lisa wanting to stay with her friends. So they changed Lisa’s routine and made a deal: From now on Lisa will always carry an extra snack with her, in case she is going to be late. </p> ​<br>Growth and development

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