Transitioning from pediatric to adult diabetes health careTTransitioning from pediatric to adult diabetes health careTransitioning from pediatric to adult diabetes health careEnglishEndocrinology;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years);Young adult (19-21 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDESanjukta Basak, MSc, MD CM, FRCPCRuth Slater, PhD, C. PsychJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An overview of helping your child make the transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care. Find out when they should start transitioning and what to expect in the future.</p><p>​​There comes a time when the teenager with <a>diabetes</a> needs to link up with a team experienced in the care of adults.</p> <p>This transition can be quite emotional and stressful for all. Moving on to a new health-care setting is like graduating from high school to college. Over a short period of time, the teenager shifts from being the biggest, oldest, and wisest person to being a young, inexperienced rookie in a larger and different environment. Some find the experience exciting. Others prefer the security of the old setting. What the team expects of your teen is different between pediatric and adult care. In the adult system, young adults are expected to have complete responsibility for themselves.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child should begin to transition to adult care as soon as they are confident and responsible enough to move forward, typically between the ages of 16 and 20 years.</li> <li>Help your teen prepare to transfer by encouraging them to take an active role in their own diabetes care.</li> <li>Your teenager should have regular tests to check for complications of diabetes. They should continue to be screened for complications as adults.</li></ul>
Transition entre les soins de santé pédiatriques et les soins pour adultesTTransition entre les soins de santé pédiatriques et les soins pour adultesTransitioning from pediatric to adult diabetes health careFrenchEndocrinology;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years);Young adult (19-21 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDESanjukta Basak, MSc, MD CM, FRCPCRuth Slater, PhD, C. PsychJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Comment aider votre enfant à passer des soins de santé pédiatriques aux soins pour adultes. Découvrez à quel âge il devrait commencer à effectuer la transition et ce à quoi il lui faudra s’attendre.<br></p><p>​​Il y a un moment où l’adolescent atteint du <a>diabète</a> doit se lier avec une équipe expérimentée dans le soin des adultes.</p> <p>Cette transition peut être assez émouvante et stressante pour tout le monde. Changer d’établissement de soins de santé, c’est comme obtenir son diplôme d’enseignement secondaire et aller au collège. Sur une courte période de temps, l’adolescent, qui était la personne la plus grande, la plus âgée et la plus sage, se retrouve jeune novice inexpérimenté dans un environnement plus grand et différent. Certains trouvent l’expérience palpitante, alors que d’autres préfèrent la sécurité de l’ancien environnement. Les attentes de l’équipe à l’égard de votre adolescent sont différentes entre les soins pédiatriques et les soins adultes. Dans le système adulte, on attend des jeunes adultes qu’ils soient entièrement responsables d’eux-mêmes.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Votre enfant devrait commencer à transitionner vers les soins adultes dès qu’il aura confiance en lui et qu’il prendra suffisamment ses responsabilités, soit d’ordinaire entre 16 et 20 ans.</li> <li>Aidez votre adolescent à s’y préparer en l’encourageant à collaborer activement à son propre traitement.</li><li>Il devrait régulièrement subir des tests afin de prévenir les complications liées au diabète et continuer à l’âge adulte. </li></ul>

 

 

Transitioning from pediatric to adult diabetes health care2519.00000000000Transitioning from pediatric to adult diabetes health careTransitioning from pediatric to adult diabetes health careTEnglishEndocrinology;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years);Young adult (19-21 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDESanjukta Basak, MSc, MD CM, FRCPCRuth Slater, PhD, C. PsychJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An overview of helping your child make the transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care. Find out when they should start transitioning and what to expect in the future.</p><p>​​There comes a time when the teenager with <a>diabetes</a> needs to link up with a team experienced in the care of adults.</p> <p>This transition can be quite emotional and stressful for all. Moving on to a new health-care setting is like graduating from high school to college. Over a short period of time, the teenager shifts from being the biggest, oldest, and wisest person to being a young, inexperienced rookie in a larger and different environment. Some find the experience exciting. Others prefer the security of the old setting. What the team expects of your teen is different between pediatric and adult care. In the adult system, young adults are expected to have complete responsibility for themselves.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child should begin to transition to adult care as soon as they are confident and responsible enough to move forward, typically between the ages of 16 and 20 years.</li> <li>Help your teen prepare to transfer by encouraging them to take an active role in their own diabetes care.</li> <li>Your teenager should have regular tests to check for complications of diabetes. They should continue to be screened for complications as adults.</li></ul><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/transitioning_from_pediatric_to_adult_health_care.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>As teenagers enter the adult system, many are surprised by the demands placed on them. They are responsible for booking and following up on their own appointments. If they are not already doing so, they may be expected to practise more intensive management of their diabetes, aiming for tighter <a href="/En/ResourceCentres/diabetes/Balancing-blood-sugar-levels/Pages/default.aspx">blood glucose (sugar)</a> control through more frequent <a href="/En/ResourceCentres/diabetes/Insulin-in-diabetes-management/Understanding-insulin/Pages/default.aspx">insulin injections</a> and blood sugar monitoring. There will be changes in <a href="/En/ResourceCentres/diabetes/Maintaining-a-healthy-diet/Pages/Meal-planning-for-children-with-diabetes.aspx">meal plans</a>, as they are no longer growing. Some find they are not as physically active as they used to be and have to make up for that with a more structured <a href="/Article?contentid=1753&language=English">exercise</a> regimen. As their risk of <a href="/En/ResourceCentres/diabetes/Complications-of-diabetes/Pages/default.aspx">complications</a> increases with age, they may have to monitor blood pressure and see an eye doctor more frequently. They should also focus on routine foot care to prevent infections and identify signs of nerve damage.</p><p>These demands can be overwhelming. The support system of family and friends throughout this transition phase is vital to ensure that the young adult continues with the care needed to manage their diabetes.</p><h2>When to make the change</h2><p>Ideally, the change to adult care should come when your teenager is confident and responsible enough to move forward. Hospital or clinic policy usually dictates a transition between the ages of 16 and 20 years. You and your teenager should be aware of this well ahead of time in order to prepare. Ask your child's <a href="/Article?contentid=2511&language=English">dia​betes team</a> for advice.</p><p>You can help your teen make a successful transfer by encouraging them to take an active part in their diabetes care as a child and into adolescence. </p><ul><li>Encourage them to solve problems and make choices about adjusting insulin doses. For example, encourage your teen to have independent visits with the diabetes team</li><li>Your teen may benefit from taking part in either an individual or group program (attend Transition day) before leaving the paediatric centre</li></ul><h2>Looking ahead</h2><p>Over the years, <a href="/Article?contentid=1726&language=English#high">high blood sugar</a> and <a href="/En/ResourceCentres/diabetes/Complications-of-diabetes/Pages/default.aspx">high blood pressure</a> levels associated with diabetes can have an impact on a person’s body. They can lead to eye problems, heart and systemic diseases, kidney problems, and nerve damage. Careful management is the best way to prevent complications from diabetes. Your teen should:</p> <ul><li>Maintain the best blood sugar control possible</li><li>Control blood pressure</li><li>Maintain a healthy weight</li><li>Eat a healthy diet</li><li>Exercise regularly</li><li>Avoid smoking</li></ul><p>Your teenager should have regular tests to check for <a href="/En/ResourceCentres/diabetes/Complications-of-diabetes/Pages/default.aspx">complications​</a>. The sooner complications are found, the sooner treatment can begin to prevent them from getting worse.</p><p>This is hard work. Because complications are very rare in young people, this threat rarely gets them to take action. Most young people, including those with diabetes, do not often think about their health 20 years down the road. That is where parents, caregivers, family members, and health-care professionals come in, to provide the foresight and support to help them stay on track toward a healthy future.</p>Transitioning from pediatric to adult diabetes health care

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