AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Anxiety: Types of disordersAAnxiety: Types of disordersAnxiety: Types of disordersEnglishPsychiatryPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-02T05:00:00ZMarijana Jovanovic, MD, FRCPC;Suneeta Monga, MD, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Find out about the different types of anxiety disorders and how long they must exist before a diagnosis can be made.</p> <p>The term "anxiety disorder" can refer to one or more of a number of conditions. These include:</p><ul><li>generalized anxiety disorder</li><li>panic disorder</li><li>separation anxiety disorder</li><li>specific phobia</li><li>social anxiety disorder</li><li>selective mutism.</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>There are six main types of anxiety disorders.</li> <li>An assessment for an anxiety disorder is needed when a child's anxiety symptoms interfere with their daily activities for a certain period of time.</li> <li>A doctor will only consider diagnosing generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobias or social anxiety disorder if a child has experienced signs and symptoms for at least six months.</li> <li>Obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorders are no longer considered to be anxiety disorders.</li> </ul> ​<h2>Treatment for anxiety disorders</h2> <p>Depending on the type of anxiety disorder that is diagnosed, a child may be prescribed <a href="/Article?contentid=701&language=English">medications</a> and/or recommended to have <a href="/Article?contentid=702&language=English">therapy or make some lifestyle changes​</a>.</p><h2>Further information</h2><p>For more information on anxiety disorders, please see the following pages:</p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=271&language=English">Anxiety: Signs and symptoms</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=701&language=English">Anxiety: Treatment with medications</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=702&language=English">Anxiety: Treatment with psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p>The following books offer useful advice and information about anxiety.</p><p>Foa, E.B., & Wasmer Andrews, L. (2006). <em>If Your Adolescent Has an Anxiety Disorder: An Essential Resource for Parents</em>. New York, NY: Oxford University Press</p><p>Huebner, D. (2005). <em>What to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid’s Guide to Overcoming Anxiety</em>. Magination Press.</p><p>Manassis, K. (2015). <em>Keys to Parenting Your Anxious Child</em>. Third edition. New York, NY: Barron’s Educational Series, Inc.</p><p>Rapee, R., et al (2008). <em>Helping Your Anxious Child: A Step-by-Step Guide for Parents</em>. Second edition. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.</p><p>Sheedy Kurcinka, M. (2015). <em>Raising Your Spirited Child: A Guide for Parents Whose Child is More Intense, Sensitive, Perceptive, Persistent, and Energetic</em>. Third edition. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers.</p>
Anxiété: types de troublesAAnxiété: types de troublesAnxiety: Types of disordersFrenchPsychiatryPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-02T05:00:00ZMarijana Jovanovic, MD, FRCPC;Suneeta Monga, MD, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez les différents types de troubles anxieux et pendant combien de temps ils doivent être présents avant de pouvoir poser un diagnostic.</p><p>​​Le terme «trouble anxieux» peut faire référence à plusieurs troubles. Par exemple:</p> <ul> <li>le trouble d’anxiété généralisée,</li> <li>le trouble panique,</li> <li>le trouble d’angoisse de la séparation,</li> <li>la phobie spécifique,</li> <li>le trouble d’anxiété sociale,</li> <li>le mutisme sélectif.</li> </ul><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Il existe six principaux types de troubles anxieux.</li> <li>Une évaluation pour déterminer la présence d’un trouble anxieux est nécessaire lorsque les symptômes d’anxiété qu’éprouvent un enfant nuisent à ses activités quotidiennes pendant un certain temps.</li> <li>Un médecin envisagera un diagnostic de trouble d’anxiété généralisée, de phobie spécifique ou d’anxiété sociale seulement si un enfant souffre de ces symptômes depuis au moins six mois.</li> <li>Le trouble obsessionnel-compulsif et les troubles de stress post-traumatique ne sont plus considérés comme des troubles anxieux.</li> </ul> ​<h2>Traitement des troubles anxieux</h2> <p>Selon le type de trouble anxieux diagnostiqué, un enfant se verra prescrit des <a href="/Article?contentid=701&language=French">médicaments</a> et/ou on lui recommandera de suivre <a href="/Article?contentid=702&language=French">une thérapie ou d’apporter quelques changements à son mode de vie​</a>.</p>

 

 

Anxiety: Types of disorders270.000000000000Anxiety: Types of disordersAnxiety: Types of disordersAEnglishPsychiatryPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-02-02T05:00:00ZMarijana Jovanovic, MD, FRCPC;Suneeta Monga, MD, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Find out about the different types of anxiety disorders and how long they must exist before a diagnosis can be made.</p> <p>The term "anxiety disorder" can refer to one or more of a number of conditions. These include:</p><ul><li>generalized anxiety disorder</li><li>panic disorder</li><li>separation anxiety disorder</li><li>specific phobia</li><li>social anxiety disorder</li><li>selective mutism.</li></ul><h2>Generalized anxiety disorder </h2> <p>Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common anxiety disorder in children and teens. Its main feature is that a person experiences many different fears and worries.</p> <p>Younger children may have worries about their future, their grades at school, natural disasters or events in the news. Older children and teens have similar worries but might also worry about the family's finances, their parents' relationships and their own relationships, among other things. </p> <p>Because of their fears and worries, children and teens with GAD might experience other symptoms such as headaches, stomach aches, difficulties sleeping and muscle tension.</p> <h3>Duration of symptoms before GAD is diagnosed</h3> <p>For a child or teen to meet the criteria for GAD, they must have a number of excessive fears and worries for at least six months.</p> <h2>Panic disorder</h2> <p>Panic disorder is rare in young children but becomes more common in older children and teens. The main symptoms of panic disorder are repeated panic attacks.</p> <p>A panic attack is an event that lasts about 10 to 15 minutes and involves a number of physical and psychological sensations. Physical sensations may include:</p> <ul> <li>a feeling of choking</li> <li>difficulty breathing</li> <li>a racing heartbeat</li> <li>sweating</li> <li>dizziness</li> <li>nausea</li> <li>shakiness.</li> </ul> <p>Psychological sensations are less common in children but can include feeling that everything is 'not real' or having an 'out of body' experience.</p> <p>Older children and teens with panic attacks fear that the attacks may make them very sick or even cause death. As a result, they fear that panic attacks will happen again and start avoiding situations where the panic attacks have occurred. Eventually they might stop leaving their home, a condition known as agoraphobia.</p> <h3>Duration of symptoms before panic disorder is diagnosed</h3> <p>For children or teens to meet the criteria for a panic disorder, they must have the above signs and symptoms for at least one month.</p> <h2>Separation anxiety disorder</h2> <p>Separation anxiety disorder occurs more commonly in children under 12 years of age, though it can also occur during the teen years.</p> <p>Children with this disorder usually experience significant distress when separating from a parent or caregiver. They will frequently express worries that something bad will happen to them or their caregiver when they are not together.</p> <p>Children and teens with separation anxiety disorder might also experience physical symptoms such as stomach aches and headaches around the time of separation. They may also have difficulties with sleeping and might not want to sleep away from home or even in a separate room from their parent or caregiver.</p> <h3>Duration of symptoms before separation anxiety disorder is diagnosed</h3> <p>For a child or teen to meet the criteria for separation anxiety disorder, they must have excessive difficulties with separation for their developmental age for at least four weeks.</p> <h2>Specific phobia</h2> <p>A specific phobia is the most common anxiety disorder in children and teens. As the name suggests, a specific phobia involves a fear of particular things or situations. The most common sources of fear include animals, needles or blood, heights and natural disasters.</p> <h3>Duration of symptoms before a specific phobia is diagnosed</h3> <p>For a child or teen to have a specific phobia, their fear must exist for at least six months and interfere with their everyday routine.</p> <h2>Social anxiety disorder</h2> <p>Social anxiety disorder symptoms include an intense fear of being judged by others or a fear of embarrassment. Children and teens with social anxiety disorder might have great difficulties in group or public situations, such as:</p> <ul> <li>meeting new people</li> <li>giving presentations at school</li> <li>attending school in general, especially if they recently joined a new school or class</li> <li>engaging in group activities</li> <li>eating in public</li> <li>using public bathrooms</li> <li>having their picture taken.</li> </ul> <h3>Duration of symptoms before social anxiety disorder is diagnosed</h3> <p>For a child or teen to be diagnosed with social anxiety disorder, their signs and symptoms must exist for at least six months and interfere with their everyday routine.</p> <h2>Selective mutism</h2> <p>Selective mutism occurs when anxiety prevents a child from speaking to others. This disorder is more common in younger children.</p> <p>Children and teens with selective mutism usually do not speak in specific situations where they would normally be expected to speak, such as at school. They might whisper or not speak at all outside of the home but speak freely and in a regular voice in other situations, for instance at home with their parents or closest family members.</p> <h3>Duration of symptoms before selective mutism is diagnosed</h3> <p>For a child or teen to meet the criteria for selective mutism, they must have ongoing difficulties speaking outside the home while, in general, having average language abilities. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>There are six main types of anxiety disorders.</li> <li>An assessment for an anxiety disorder is needed when a child's anxiety symptoms interfere with their daily activities for a certain period of time.</li> <li>A doctor will only consider diagnosing generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobias or social anxiety disorder if a child has experienced signs and symptoms for at least six months.</li> <li>Obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorders are no longer considered to be anxiety disorders.</li> </ul> ​<h2>Treatment for anxiety disorders</h2> <p>Depending on the type of anxiety disorder that is diagnosed, a child may be prescribed <a href="/Article?contentid=701&language=English">medications</a> and/or recommended to have <a href="/Article?contentid=702&language=English">therapy or make some lifestyle changes​</a>.</p><h2>Other disorders</h2><p>In the past, <a href="/Article?contentid=285&language=English">obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=1927&language=English">post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)​</a> were regarded as other types of anxiety disorders. However, they are now classified as separate mental health disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 (DSM-5).</p><h2>Further information</h2><p>For more information on anxiety disorders, please see the following pages:</p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=271&language=English">Anxiety: Signs and symptoms</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=701&language=English">Anxiety: Treatment with medications</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=702&language=English">Anxiety: Treatment with psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p>The following books offer useful advice and information about anxiety.</p><p>Foa, E.B., & Wasmer Andrews, L. (2006). <em>If Your Adolescent Has an Anxiety Disorder: An Essential Resource for Parents</em>. New York, NY: Oxford University Press</p><p>Huebner, D. (2005). <em>What to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid’s Guide to Overcoming Anxiety</em>. Magination Press.</p><p>Manassis, K. (2015). <em>Keys to Parenting Your Anxious Child</em>. Third edition. New York, NY: Barron’s Educational Series, Inc.</p><p>Rapee, R., et al (2008). <em>Helping Your Anxious Child: A Step-by-Step Guide for Parents</em>. Second edition. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.</p><p>Sheedy Kurcinka, M. (2015). <em>Raising Your Spirited Child: A Guide for Parents Whose Child is More Intense, Sensitive, Perceptive, Persistent, and Energetic</em>. Third edition. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers.</p><img alt="" height="2576" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/anxiety_types_disorders.jpg" width="3865" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/anxiety_types_disorders.jpgAnxiety: Types of disordersFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.