Molluscum contagiosumMMolluscum contagiosumMolluscum contagiosumEnglishDermatologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-05-12T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, Peng000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find information about molluscum contagiosum, a common rash that looks like small, raised, flesh-coloured bumps. Also learn about how to stop the virus from spreading to others.</p><h2>What is molluscum contagiosum?</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum is a viral skin infection. It is very common in children, particularly between the ages of two and five. The infection causes small, firm, shiny bumps (papules) on the skin. In healthy individuals, the virus usually goes away on its own and is usually more of a nuisance than a serious condition.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Molluscum contagiosum causes small, firm, shiny bumps on your child's skin.</li><li>Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus. It can spread easily to other parts of the body or to other people, either by direct skin-to-skin contact or by touching infected objects.</li><li>Molluscum contagiosum will usually go away on its own but if bothersome can be treated by your child’s doctor.</li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of molluscum contagiosum</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum looks like raised bumps on the skin. These bumps can appear anywhere on the body but are more commonly seen on the arms, legs and torso. They should not appear on the palms, soles and scalp. There may be only one bump or they may appear in groups. They appear two to seven weeks after catching the virus. /p> </p><p>The bumps are usually 2 to 5 mm across and are dome-shaped with a central dimple. They are usually flesh-coloured, but they can become red and inflamed. They can be itchy and can come off easily if your child scratches them. This could spread the virus to nearby skin, other parts of the body or other people.</p><h2>Cause of molluscum contagiosum</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a pox virus.</p><h2>What a doctor can do to help your child with molluscum contagiosum</h2><p>Your child's doctor will first examine your child's skin. Usually a diagnosis can be made with this simple examination.</p><p>If the infection affects only a small area of your child's body, the doctor may scrape off the bumps to treat the infection.</p><p>If the infection affects a large area or is very bothersome to your child, your child may need to see a skin specialist (dermatologist). Your child's doctor or the dermatologist may scrape the bumps away (curettage), freeze them (cryotherapy), or apply medication to the bumps.</p><h2>When to seek medical assistance</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum is not an emergency, but it should be evaluated by your child's doctor. If it is not treated, the condition will usually disappear on its own in a few weeks or months, but it can spread to other parts of the body or to other children who come into contact. If you suspect your child has molluscum contagiosum, make an appointment with your child's doctor.</p>
Molluscum contagiosumMMolluscum contagiosumMolluscum contagiosumFrenchDermatologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-05-12T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, Peng000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Vous trouverez ici de l’information à l’attention des parents sur le molluscum contagiosum.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce que le molluscum contagiosum? </h2> <p>Le molluscum contagiosum est une infection cutanée bénigne. Il est très commun chez les enfants âgés de 2 à 5 ans. L’infection provoque l’apparition sur la peau de petites bosses fermes et lustrées (des papules). </p> <h2>À​​ retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Le molluscum contagiosum provoque l’apparition de petites bosses fermes et lustrées sur la peau de votre enfant.</li> <li>Le molluscum contagiosum est une infection provoquée par un virus. Il peut se propager facilement à d’autres personnes, soit par contact direct de peau à peau, soit en touchant des objets contaminés.</li> <li>Le médecin de votre enfant peut traiter le molluscum contagiosum. ​​</li> </ul><h2>Signes et symptômes du molluscum contagiosum </h2> <p>Le molluscum contagiosum se présente sous forme de bosses sur la peau du visage de votre enfant, de ses bras, de ses jambes et de son corps. Elles apparaissent entre 2 et 7 semaines après avoir contracté l’infection. </p> <p>Les bosses sont bombées (en forme de dôme) avec une fossette au centre. Elles sont habituellement de couleur incarnat, mais peuvent rougir davantage et être enflammées. Les bosses peuvent facilement se détacher si votre enfant les gratte; ce faisant, le virus se propage à la peau juste à côté. </p> <h2>Causes du molluscum contagiosum </h2> <p>Le molluscum contagiosum est une infection provoquée par le virus molluscum contagiosum.</p> <h2>En quoi un médecin peut soigner votre enfant s’il a contracté le molluscum contagiosum</h2> <p>Dans un premier temps, le médecin examinera la peau de votre enfant. Habituellement, un simple examen permet d’établir un diagnostic. </p> <p>Si l’infection ne touche qu’une région limitée du corps de votre enfant, le médecin peut procéder au grattage des bosses pour traiter l’infection. </p> <p>Si l’infection touche une région plus étendue du corps de votre enfant, il faudra peut-être que votre enfant consulte un dermatologue (spécialiste des maladies de la peau). Le dermatologue peut gratter les saillies (curetage), les geler (cryothérapie) ou prescrire un médicament à appliquer sur les bosses. </p> <h2>Quand doit-on faire appel à l’aide d’un médecin </h2> <p>Le molluscum contagiosum n’est pas un cas d’urgence, mais le médecin de votre enfant doit en faire l’évaluation. Si la pathologie n’est pas traitée, elle disparaîtra habituellement d’elle-même au bout de quelques semaines ou de quelques mois, mais elle peut se propager à d’autres parties de l’organisme de votre enfant ou aux enfants avec lesquels il est en contact. Le molluscum contagiosum peut avoir un aspect incommodant et être une source d’angoisse pour votre enfant. Si vous pensez que votre enfant a contracté le molluscum contagiosum, prenez rendez-vous avec son médecin. </p>

 

 

Molluscum contagiosum28.0000000000000Molluscum contagiosumMolluscum contagiosumMEnglishDermatologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-05-12T04:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, Peng000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find information about molluscum contagiosum, a common rash that looks like small, raised, flesh-coloured bumps. Also learn about how to stop the virus from spreading to others.</p><h2>What is molluscum contagiosum?</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum is a viral skin infection. It is very common in children, particularly between the ages of two and five. The infection causes small, firm, shiny bumps (papules) on the skin. In healthy individuals, the virus usually goes away on its own and is usually more of a nuisance than a serious condition.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Molluscum contagiosum causes small, firm, shiny bumps on your child's skin.</li><li>Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus. It can spread easily to other parts of the body or to other people, either by direct skin-to-skin contact or by touching infected objects.</li><li>Molluscum contagiosum will usually go away on its own but if bothersome can be treated by your child’s doctor.</li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of molluscum contagiosum</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum looks like raised bumps on the skin. These bumps can appear anywhere on the body but are more commonly seen on the arms, legs and torso. They should not appear on the palms, soles and scalp. There may be only one bump or they may appear in groups. They appear two to seven weeks after catching the virus. /p> </p><p>The bumps are usually 2 to 5 mm across and are dome-shaped with a central dimple. They are usually flesh-coloured, but they can become red and inflamed. They can be itchy and can come off easily if your child scratches them. This could spread the virus to nearby skin, other parts of the body or other people.</p><h2>Cause of molluscum contagiosum</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a pox virus.</p><h2>Molluscum contagiosum spreads easily</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum spreads through direct person-to-person contact. It also spreads indirectly through contact with infected objects. For example, the infection can be spread by touching kickboards at a swimming pool or doorknobs at school. Or the virus can be spread on infected objects such as toys, clothing or towels.</p><p>The virus spreads when an open or burst papule touches skin or an object. Scratching or picking at the bumps can spread the virus to nearby skin.</p><h2>What a doctor can do to help your child with molluscum contagiosum</h2><p>Your child's doctor will first examine your child's skin. Usually a diagnosis can be made with this simple examination.</p><p>If the infection affects only a small area of your child's body, the doctor may scrape off the bumps to treat the infection.</p><p>If the infection affects a large area or is very bothersome to your child, your child may need to see a skin specialist (dermatologist). Your child's doctor or the dermatologist may scrape the bumps away (curettage), freeze them (cryotherapy), or apply medication to the bumps.</p><h2>Preventing the spread of infection</h2><p>Here are some tips on how your child can prevent spreading the infection to other family members or classmates:</p><ul><li>Wash their hands</li><li>Avoid touching, rubbing, or scratching the bumps</li><li>Do not share personal items with their friends</li><li>Do not use other children's personal items</li><li>Cover the bumps if your child is working or playing closely with other children</li></ul><h2>When to seek medical assistance</h2><p>Molluscum contagiosum is not an emergency, but it should be evaluated by your child's doctor. If it is not treated, the condition will usually disappear on its own in a few weeks or months, but it can spread to other parts of the body or to other children who come into contact. If you suspect your child has molluscum contagiosum, make an appointment with your child's doctor.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Molluscum_contagiosum.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Molluscum_contagiosum.jpgMolluscum contagiosum

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