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Medicines for leukemiaMMedicines for leukemiaMedicines for leukemiaEnglishOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemDrug treatment;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZOussama Abla, MDDanielle Weidman, MDKarin Landenberg, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn which medicines children with leukemia should avoid and what you should discuss with their doctor or pharmacist about medication.</p><p>While being treated for leukemia, your child will take many different medications, during different stages of chemotherapy.</p> <p>Chemotherapeutic drugs work by targeting the leukemic cells inside your child’s blood, bone marrow or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While they are effective at killing the cancer cells, they may also cause side effects. Not all children will experience every side effect listed for each medicine.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>Chemotherapeutic drugs may cause side effects in some children and not others. </li><li> Talk to your doctor or pharmacist to ensure you are giving your child the right medication and to check before giving any other medicines.</li></ul>
Médicaments pour la leucémieMMédicaments pour la leucémieMedicines for leukemiaFrenchOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemDrug treatment;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZLes agents chimiothérapeutiques s’attaquent aux cellules cancéreuses qui ont envahi le sang, la moelle osseuse ou le liquide céphalorachidien de votre enfant. Bien qu’ils suppriment les cellules cancéreuses, il arrive aussi qu’ils provoquent des effets seFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez quels médicaments les enfants atteints de leucémie devraient éviter et de quels sujets liés aux médicaments vous devriez discuter avec son médecin ou son pharmacien.</p><p>Votre enfant prendra plusieurs médicaments différents pendant les étapes de sa chimiothérapie comme traitement contre sa leucémie.</p><p>Les agents chimiothérapeutiques s’attaquent aux cellules cancéreuses qui ont envahi le sang, la moelle osseuse ou le liquide céphalorachidien de votre enfant. Bien qu’ils suppriment les cellules cancéreuses, il arrive aussi qu’ils provoquent des effets secondaires. Précisons que les effets secondaires ressentis pour chaque médicament varient selon les enfants.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Les agents chimiothérapeutiques peuvent causer des effets secondaires chez certains enfants, mais pas chez d’autres.</li><li>Vérifiez auprès de votre médecin ou de votre pharmacien si vous administrez le bon médicament à votre enfant et consultez-les avant de lui donner d’autres médicaments.</li></ul>

 

 

Medicines for leukemia2853.00000000000Medicines for leukemiaMedicines for leukemiaMEnglishOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemDrug treatment;Non-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZOussama Abla, MDDanielle Weidman, MDKarin Landenberg, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn which medicines children with leukemia should avoid and what you should discuss with their doctor or pharmacist about medication.</p><p>While being treated for leukemia, your child will take many different medications, during different stages of chemotherapy.</p> <p>Chemotherapeutic drugs work by targeting the leukemic cells inside your child’s blood, bone marrow or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While they are effective at killing the cancer cells, they may also cause side effects. Not all children will experience every side effect listed for each medicine.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>Chemotherapeutic drugs may cause side effects in some children and not others. </li><li> Talk to your doctor or pharmacist to ensure you are giving your child the right medication and to check before giving any other medicines.</li></ul><p><strong>Here are some points to keep in mind during your child’s treatment. </strong></p> <ul> <li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li> <li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others. Do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child.</li> <li>Check with your child’s doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines. These include prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products.</li> <li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.</li> <li>Do not give your child drugs containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) without talking to your doctor. Many non-prescription drugs contain ASA, such as aspirin and some cold medications.</li> <li>Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is sometimes needed to manage pain or fever. It is important to be aware that acetaminophen could mask a fever that could go unnoticed. Check your child’s temperature before giving them acetaminophen. Allow the first dose of medication to wear off before you give more. </li> <li>Ibuprofen (Advil) is not recommended for children with leukemia because it may affect their platelet function.</li> <li>Ask your pharmacist if you have questions or concerns when choosing non-prescription medicines. </li> <li>Keep all medications out of your child’s sight and reach and locked up in a safe place. If your child takes a larger dose than they should have, call your primary doctor, nurse, or the hematology/oncology service at your hospital. If none are available, call the Poison Information Centre for your region.</li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/medicines_for_leukemia.jpgMedicines for leukemiaFalse

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