Obsessive compulsive disorder: How it affects your child's lifeOObsessive compulsive disorder: How it affects your child's lifeObsessive compulsive disorder: How it affects your child's lifeEnglishPsychiatrySchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-07-19T04:00:00ZSandra L. Mendlowitz, PhD, C Psych​​000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z​Discover how OCD can impact a child's family and school life and their long-term future.<h2>What is the difference between OCD and occasional unusual thoughts or a preference for routine?</h2><p>Most people experience unwelcome thoughts or images now and then. Similarly, many children and teens, as well as adults, prefer specific routines from time to time.</p><p>Children usually express a preference for rituals from about 18 months until around age two to three. These are called age-dependent behaviours and are completely normal. During this time, it is not unusual for children to want to eat the ingredients of their meals in a particular order or have their toys lined up in a certain way, for example.</p><p>What separates these preferences and age-dependent behaviours from OCD is a person's ability to dismiss their thoughts and/or be flexible with their behaviour and still maintain regular function. For instance, someone without OCD would not get upset if their thought were interrupted and would not feel compelled (forced) to perform or complete a ritual.</p><p>In contrast, people with OCD tend to be very rigid in these situations. This is because they tend to dislike change and are consumed by following a routine sequence. If they are interrupted, they will insist on returning to the routine to complete it. Another difference is that completing a pattern, sequence or routine becomes very time-consuming.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A child's OCD can disrupt family life, interfere with schooling and have a negative effect on relationships with peers.</li> <li>If left untreated, OCD can lead to other mental health conditions, social isolation and difficulty holding regular employment.</li> </ul><h2>Further information</h2><p>For more information about OCD, please see the following pages:</p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=285&language=English">OCD: Overview</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=288&language=English">OCD: Signs and symptoms</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=709&language=English">OCD: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=287&language=English">OCD: How to help your child</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p>The following books and websites have some useful advice about OCD for parents and teens.</p><h3>Books</h3><p>Chansky, T. (2001). <em>Freeing Your Child from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: a Powerful, Practical Program for Parents of Children and Adolescents</em>. Harmony.</p><p>Derisley, J., et al (2008). <em>Breaking Free from OCD: a CBT Guide for Young People and Their Families</em>. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. </p><p>Dotson, A. (2014). <em>Being Me with OCD: How I Learned to Obsess Less and Enjoy My Life</em>. Free Spirit Publishing. </p><p>Jassi, A. (2013). <em>Can I Tell You about OCD? A Guide for Friends, Family, and Professionals</em>. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.</p><h3>Websites</h3><p>International OCD Foundation (2016). <a href="https://kids.iocdf.org/" target="_blank"><em>OCD in Kids</em></a> </p><p>TeenMentalHealth.org (2016). <em><a href="http://teenmentalhealth.org/learn/mental-disorders/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd/" target="_blank">Obsessive Compulsive Disorder</a></em></p><p>AnxietyBC (2016). <em><a href="https://www.anxietybc.com/parenting/obsessive-compulsive-disorder" target="_blank">Obsessive Compulsive Disorder</a></em></p>
Le trouble obsessionnel-compulsif (TOC): comment les TOC affectent-ils la vie de votre enfantLLe trouble obsessionnel-compulsif (TOC): comment les TOC affectent-ils la vie de votre enfantObsessive compulsive disorder: How it affects your child's lifeFrenchPsychiatrySchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-07-19T04:00:00ZSandra L. Mendlowitz, PhD, CPsych​​000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez comment le TOC peut affecter la famille de l’enfant, sa scolarité et son avenir à long terme.</p><h2>Quelle est la différence entre le TOC et le fait d'éprouver des pensées bizarres de temps à autre ou d'avoir une préférence pour la routine?</h2> <p>La plupart des gens éprouvent des pensées dérangeantes de temps à autre. De la même façon, de nombreux enfants et adolescents, ainsi que des adultes, préfèrent suivre des routines particulières de temps à autre.</p> <p>En général, les tout-petits se sentent mieux en suivant des rituels, de l’âge de 18 mois jusqu’à deux ou trois ans. Il s’agit de comportements liés à l’âge et tout à fait normaux. Durant cette période, il n’est pas inhabituel pour l’enfant de vouloir manger les éléments de son repas dans un ordre particulier ou d’aligner ses jouets d’une certaine manière, par exemple.</p> <p>La différence entre ces préférences et comportements liés à l’âge et le TOC est la capacité à repousser des pensées, à être flexible dans son comportement et à continuer à fonctionner. Par exemple, une personne qui ne souffre pas de TOC ne sera pas dérangée si ses pensées sont interrompues et ne se sentira pas obligée (forcée) de suivre un rituel.</p> <p>En revanche, une personne souffrant de TOC tend à être très rigide dans ces situations. C’est parce qu’elle n’aime pas le changement et est totalement absorbée par le fait de suivre une certaine routine. En cas d’interruption, elle va insister sur le fait de reprendre sa routine et de la mener à bien. Une autre différence est qu'il faut beaucoup plus de temps pour exécuter un plan, une séquence ou une routine.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Le TOC peut perturber la vie familiale, compromettre la scolarité et avoir un effet négatif sur les relations avec les pairs.</li> <li>Faute de traitement, le TOC peut entraîner d’autres troubles de santé mentale, l’isolement social et de la difficulté à conserver un emploi.</li> </ul>

 

 

Obsessive compulsive disorder: How it affects your child's life286.000000000000Obsessive compulsive disorder: How it affects your child's lifeObsessive compulsive disorder: How it affects your child's lifeOEnglishPsychiatrySchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-07-19T04:00:00ZSandra L. Mendlowitz, PhD, C Psych​​000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z​Discover how OCD can impact a child's family and school life and their long-term future.<h2>What is the difference between OCD and occasional unusual thoughts or a preference for routine?</h2><p>Most people experience unwelcome thoughts or images now and then. Similarly, many children and teens, as well as adults, prefer specific routines from time to time.</p><p>Children usually express a preference for rituals from about 18 months until around age two to three. These are called age-dependent behaviours and are completely normal. During this time, it is not unusual for children to want to eat the ingredients of their meals in a particular order or have their toys lined up in a certain way, for example.</p><p>What separates these preferences and age-dependent behaviours from OCD is a person's ability to dismiss their thoughts and/or be flexible with their behaviour and still maintain regular function. For instance, someone without OCD would not get upset if their thought were interrupted and would not feel compelled (forced) to perform or complete a ritual.</p><p>In contrast, people with OCD tend to be very rigid in these situations. This is because they tend to dislike change and are consumed by following a routine sequence. If they are interrupted, they will insist on returning to the routine to complete it. Another difference is that completing a pattern, sequence or routine becomes very time-consuming.</p><h2>Impact of OCD on child's daily life</h2> <p>The main features of OCD include the presence of obsessions and/or compulsions that:</p> <ul> <li>take up at least one hour of a child's day</li> <li>significantly interfere with or impair a child's life at home, at school, with peers and, if they are employed, at work</li> </ul> <h3>Impact on family life</h3> <p>If a child has OCD, common effects on the family include:</p> <ul> <li>disruption of family activities and routines</li> <li>parent frustration</li> <li>sibling discontent</li> <li>arguments</li> </ul> <h3>Impact on schooling</h3> <p>At school, a child or teen with OCD can:</p> <ul> <li>be distracted (because of their unwelcome thoughts)</li> <li>waste time (because of their prolonged rituals)</li> <li>experience medical problems (for example if they refuse to use school washrooms all day)</li> <li>be indecisive</li> <li>be consistently late for school or class or refuse to attend</li> <li>be unable to use school library books or shared materials for fear of contamination</li> <li>experience falling grades</li> </ul> <h3>Impact on relationships with peers</h3> <p>OCD in a child can, understandably, be difficult for other children to understand. Because of the insistence on order and rules, OCD can disrupt a range of activities between a child and their peers. In turn, this can lead to bullying or to a child being excluded or isolated in more subtle ways.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A child's OCD can disrupt family life, interfere with schooling and have a negative effect on relationships with peers.</li> <li>If left untreated, OCD can lead to other mental health conditions, social isolation and difficulty holding regular employment.</li> </ul><h2>Long-term effects of OCD</h2> <p>If left untreated, OCD can lead to a range of longer-term social and psychological problems for a child. These include:</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">depression</a> and other mental health conditions</li> <li>eating disorders such as <a href="/Article?contentid=268&language=English">anorexia</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=274&language=English">avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder​</a>, when OCD rituals include eating</li> <li>long-term under-performance at school</li> <li>social isolation</li> <li>inability to hold regular employment</li> <li>a general inability to reach their potential</li> </ul><h2>Further information</h2><p>For more information about OCD, please see the following pages:</p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=285&language=English">OCD: Overview</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=288&language=English">OCD: Signs and symptoms</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=709&language=English">OCD: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></p><p><a href="/Article?contentid=287&language=English">OCD: How to help your child</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p>The following books and websites have some useful advice about OCD for parents and teens.</p><h3>Books</h3><p>Chansky, T. (2001). <em>Freeing Your Child from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: a Powerful, Practical Program for Parents of Children and Adolescents</em>. Harmony.</p><p>Derisley, J., et al (2008). <em>Breaking Free from OCD: a CBT Guide for Young People and Their Families</em>. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. </p><p>Dotson, A. (2014). <em>Being Me with OCD: How I Learned to Obsess Less and Enjoy My Life</em>. Free Spirit Publishing. </p><p>Jassi, A. (2013). <em>Can I Tell You about OCD? A Guide for Friends, Family, and Professionals</em>. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.</p><h3>Websites</h3><p>International OCD Foundation (2016). <a href="https://kids.iocdf.org/" target="_blank"><em>OCD in Kids</em></a> </p><p>TeenMentalHealth.org (2016). <em><a href="http://teenmentalhealth.org/learn/mental-disorders/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd/" target="_blank">Obsessive Compulsive Disorder</a></em></p><p>AnxietyBC (2016). <em><a href="https://www.anxietybc.com/parenting/obsessive-compulsive-disorder" target="_blank">Obsessive Compulsive Disorder</a></em></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/obsessive_compulsive_disorder_affects.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/obsessive_compulsive_disorder_affects.jpgObsessive compulsive disorder: How it affects your child's life

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