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Secondary cancersSSecondary cancersSecondary CancersEnglishOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZOussama Abla, MDDanielle Weidman, MDKarin Landenberg, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn why your child is at risk of developing secondary cancers after they are treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).</p><p>Children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at risk of developing secondary cancers. Regular follow-up after treatment is important so that your child's doctor can check for any early signs of these cancers. </p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>After your child is treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), they are at risk of developing secondary leukemias or other secondary cancers, brain tumours, skin cancer or thyroid cancer.</li></ul>
Cancers secondairesCCancers secondairesSecondary cancersFrenchOncologyChild (0-12 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZOussama Abla, MDDanielle Weidman, MDKarin Landenberg, MDFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez pourquoi votre enfant risque de développer des cancers secondaires après avoir reçu des traitements contre la leucémie lymphoblastique aiguë (LLA).</p><p>Les enfants traités pour la leucémie lymphoblastique aiguë (LLA) sont à risque de développer des cancers secondaires. C’est pourquoi les rendez-vous de suivi après les traitements sont importants, pour que le médecin de votre enfant puisse vérifier la présence de signes précoces de ces cancers.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Après avoir reçu un traitement contre la LLA, votre enfant est à risque de développer des leucémies secondaires ou d’autres formes de cancers secondaires, des tumeurs cérébrales, un cancer de la peau ou de la thyroïde.</li></ul>

 

 

Secondary cancers2873.00000000000Secondary cancersSecondary CancersSEnglishOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00ZOussama Abla, MDDanielle Weidman, MDKarin Landenberg, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn why your child is at risk of developing secondary cancers after they are treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).</p><p>Children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at risk of developing secondary cancers. Regular follow-up after treatment is important so that your child's doctor can check for any early signs of these cancers. </p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>After your child is treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), they are at risk of developing secondary leukemias or other secondary cancers, brain tumours, skin cancer or thyroid cancer.</li></ul><h2>Secondary leukemias </h2><p>While on chemotherapy, your child takes medicines that damage the DNA inside leukemic cells. These drugs include alkylating agents or topoisomerase inhibitors. One example is Cyclophosphamide, which is used in consolidation and delayed intesification phases for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). They may also damage the DNA of healthy blood cells, causing leukemia for a second time. </p><h2>Secondary cancers after radiation therapy</h2><p>After receiving radiation, several factors including the dose and site of radiation influence of child’s risk of developing a secondary cancer.</p><h2>Brain tumours</h2><p>Children with high-risk ALL may be treated with radiation that is directed towards their central nervous system (CNS). The radiation can disrupt cells that surround the CNS, causing brain tumors such as meningioma.</p><p>For more information, please visit the <a href="/Article?contentid=2479&language=English">Brain Tumour Learning Hub</a>.</p><h2>Skin cancer</h2><p>Skin cancer starts from skin cells. The cancer tends to form on the face, ear, neck, lips and the backs of hands. If your child received radiation, the cancer can form on areas where your child was irradiated. It can grow quickly or slowly, but rarely spreads to other parts of the body. </p><h2>Thyroid cancer</h2><p>The thyroid gland is located in the neck. Radiation can also damage cells inside the thyroid, causing cancer. Generally, thyroid cancers can be cured.</p>Secondary cancersFalse

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