Elastic compression garmentsEElastic compression garmentsElastic compression garmentsEnglishHaematologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Arm;LegsCardiovascular systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZLeonardo Brandao, MD, MSc.;Jennifer Vincelli, RN (EC), BScN, MN;Maria Laura Avila, MD, PhD;Celeste Lumia, BKin;Madeline Montoya, BA;Talia RahifHealth (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Elastic compression garments improve symptoms of deep vein thrombosis and post-thrombotic syndrome. Find out what they are and how to properly use them.</p><p>​​Elastic compression garments are used to improve symptoms of <a href="/article?contentid=2534&language=English">deep vein thrombosis (DVT)</a> and <a href="/article?contentid=2884&language=English">post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS)​</a> by helping to transport blood back to the heart. They prevent fluid from pooling in the affected limb, as well as reduce swelling, pain and other symptoms.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Elastic compression garments are used to improve symptoms of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) by helping to transport blood back to the heart.</li><li>Compression garments are available in different degrees of pressure, depending on your child’s needs.</li><li>Wearing the compression garment is especially important when participating in physical activity, while travelling, or when your child’s symptoms of PTS worsen. </li><li>Compression garments should be worn daily for however long they continue to ease and improve symptoms of DVT and PTS, which can vary by weeks, months or years.</li><li>Compression garments should be replaced every six months, if worn daily.</li></ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><p>Stop using the compression garments and contact the thrombosis clinic or the thrombosis doctor in case of:</p> <ul><li>increase in pain with the use of compression garments</li><li>change in the color and temperature of the skin with the use of compression garments: toes turn pale and cold or purple.<br></li></ul><h2>What are elastic compression garments?</h2><p>Elastic compression garments are made of breathable elastic fabrics such as nylon, cotton, spandex or natural rubber. They are occasionally referred to as “graduated compression garments”. The stockings are tightest at the ankle (where the most pressure is put by the body) and become less tight as the garment moves up the leg. A compression sleeve is tightest at the wrist and becomes less tight as it moves up the arm.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Effect of elastic compression garments on damaged veins</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/compression_garments_damaged_veins_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can damage a vein. As a result, the vein wall does not function properly and the vein valves open wider than usual. This results in backward blood flow, away from the heart. Compression garments gently compress the muscle and expanded vein wall, allowing the valves to close once again, resulting in healthier blood flow towards the heart.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Compression garments are typically available in several different lengths and sizes. Stockings can come up to the knee, thigh, or waist, with an option of open or closed toe. Your doctor will prescribe the appropriate garment length, but knee-high stockings are the most commonly prescribed in children with PTS in the legs.</p><p>For the arms, sleeves are only made in a full-length style. The sleeve ends about two fingers below the underarm and begins either at the wrist (sleeve-style), the thumb (gauntlet-style) or midway through the fingers (glove-style).</p><p>Elastic compression garments gently compress the muscles in the affected limb as well as the expanded vein walls. With the vein walls being less stretched, the vein valves are able to close once again, resulting in healthier overall circulation.</p><h3>Class of compression</h3><p>Compression garments are available in various degrees of pressure, or classes of compression. Compression is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg), with the highest compression at the ankle or wrist joints. The higher the pressure is, the tighter the garment will fit. There are different compression levels (15-20 mmHg, 20-30 mmHg, 30-40 mmHg and +40 mmHg) depending on what your child needs. </p><h2>How to wear elastic compression garments</h2><p>Elastic compression garments are intended to be tight. This can make putting them on difficult, especially when putting them on your child. The following tips will make it easier to put on the garments:</p><ul><li>Wash the garment before the first use, to decrease its stiffness. </li><li>Ensure the limb is dry. It is important to apply moisturizing cream to the skin after each use because garments can cause dry skin. Applying creams at the end of the day, when the garment is removed, ensures that moisturizers are completely absorbed before putting on the garment the following day. This will increase the lifespan of the garment. </li><li>Do not pull the stocking by the top (as with a normal sock), since that will make application more difficult and will take more time. Instead, invert (turn inside out) the stocking halfway and insert the foot until the stocking is over the heel. Next, using your palm rather than fingers, gradually unfold the stocking moving up the leg. </li><li>For sleeves: Invert the sleeve halfway and put the hand through it until the bottom part of the sleeve is at the level of the wrist. Then, use the palm of your hand to glide the sleeve up toward the underarm.</li><li>Technique to remove garments: Holding the top of the garment, peel the sleeve or stocking down the limb. The garment should be inside out once removed.</li><li>After properly applying the knee-high stockings or sleeve, the top of the garment should be approximately one-inch below the bend of the knee or underarm.</li></ul><p>An expert garment fitter can show you some tricks and devices to help apply the stocking or sleeve, such as using a donning glove (or a rubber cleaning glove) to make putting on the garment easier.</p><p>The length or size of the garment may be wrong for your child if:</p><ul><li>They want to fold or roll the top of the garment down, away from the bend in the knee or underarm.</li><li>The stocking continuously slides or rolls down on its own.</li></ul>
Vêtements de compression élastiquesVVêtements de compression élastiquesElastic compression garmentsFrenchHaematologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Arm;LegsCardiovascular systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZLeonardo Brandao, MD, MSc.;Jennifer Vincelli, RN (EC), BScN, MN;Maria Laura Avila, MD, PhD;Celeste Lumia, BKin;Madeline Montoya, BA;Talia RahifHealth (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Les vêtements de compression élastiques soulagent les symptômes de la thrombose veineuse profonde et de la maladie post-phlébitique. Apprenez-en plus sur ces vêtements et sur leur utilisation adéquate.</p><p>Les vêtements de compression élastiques sont utilisés afin de soulager les symptômes de la <a href="/article?contentid=2534&language=French">thrombose veineuse profonde</a> (TVP) et de la <a href="/article?contentid=2884&language=French">maladie post-phlébitique (MPP)</a> en aidant à transporter le sang jusqu’au cœur. Ils préviennent l’accumulation de fluides dans le membre atteint en plus de réduire l’enflure, la douleur et d’autres symptômes.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Les vêtements de compression élastiques sont utilisés afin de soulager les symptômes de la thrombose veineuse profonde (TVP) et de la maladie post-phlébitique (MPP) en aidant à transporter le sang jusqu’au cœur.</li><li>Les vêtements de compression sont disponibles en différents niveaux de pression, en fonction des besoins de votre enfant.</li><li>Il est particulièrement important de porter le vêtement de compression lorsque votre enfant pratique une activité physique, qu’il voyage ou lorsque les symptômes de sa maladie post-phlébitique s’aggravent.</li><li>Les vêtements de compression élastiques doivent être portés tous les jours tant qu’ils soulagent et atténuent les symptômes de la thrombose veineuse profonde et de la maladie post-phlébitique, ce qui peut durer des semaines, des mois ou des années.</li><li>Les vêtements de compression doivent être remplacés aux six mois s’ils sont portés tous les jours.<br></li></ul><h2>Quand consulter un médecin</h2><p>Arrêtez d’utiliser les vêtements de compression et communiquez avec la clinique de thrombose ou le médecin spécialisé en thrombose en cas :</p><ul><li>d’une augmentation de la douleur lors du port des vêtements de compression;</li><li>de changement de la couleur et de la température de la peau lors du port des vêtements de compression : orteils qui deviennent pâles et froids ou bleus.</li></ul><h2>Que sont les vêtements de compression élastiques?</h2><p>Les vêtements de compression élastiques sont faits d’un tissu élastique respirant tels que le nylon, le coton, le spandex ou le caoutchouc naturel. On les nomme parfois « vêtements de compression graduée ». Les bas sont le plus serrés à la cheville (où la pression posée par le corps est la plus grande) et deviennent moins serrés à mesure que le vêtement l’élève le long de la jambe. Une manche de compression est la plus serrée au poignet et devient moins serrée à mesure qu’elle s’élève le long du bras.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Effet des vêtements de compression élastiques sur les veines endommagées</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/compression_garments_damaged_veins_FR.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Une thrombose veineuse profonde (TVP) peut endommager une veine. La paroi de la veine ne peut alors fonctionner correctement et les valvules s’ouvrent davantage qu’à l’habitude. Le sang reflue en direction opposée du cœur. Les vêtements de compression compriment doucement le muscle et élargissent la paroi veineuse, permettant aux valvules de se fermer à nouveau, entraînant une meilleure circulation sanguine en direction du cœur.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Les vêtements de compression sont généralement disponibles en différentes longueurs et en différentes tailles. Les bas peuvent s’élever jusqu’au genou, à la cuisse ou à la taille avec l’option d’une pointe ouverte ou fermée. Votre médecin vous prescrira la longueur de vêtement appropriée, mais les bas aux genoux sont les plus fréquemment prescrits chez les enfants atteints de la maladie post-phlébitique des jambes.</p><p>Dans le cas des bras, les manches ne sont confectionnées qu’en pleine longueur. La manche se termine environ à 2,5 cm en dessous de l’aisselle et commence soit au poignet (style manche), au pouce (style gantelet) ou à mi-longueur des doigts (style gant).</p><p>Les vêtements de compression élastiques compressent doucement les muscles du membre de même que les parois veineuses distendues. Comme les parois des veines sont moins distendues, les valvules sont en mesure de se fermer de nouveau, entraînant une circulation généralisée plus saine.</p><h3>Classe de compression</h3><p>Les vêtements de compression sont disponibles en différents niveaux de pression, ou classes de compression. La compression est mesurée en millimètre de mercure (mmHg) où la plus forte compression se situe à l’articulation des chevilles ou des poignets. Plus la pression est haute, plus le vêtement sera ajusté. Différents niveaux de compression existent (15-20 mmHg, 20-30 mmHg, 30-40 mmHg et plus de 40 mmHg), en fonction des besoins de votre enfant.</p><h2>Comment porter les vêtements de compression élastiques</h2><p>Les vêtements de compression élastiques sont conçus pour être serrés, ce qui peut les rendre difficiles à enfiler, particulièrement lorsque vous les enfilez à votre enfant. Les conseils suivants vous aideront à enfiler les vêtements :</p><ul><li>lavez le vêtement avant la première utilisation afin de diminuer sa raideur;</li><li>assurez-vous que le membre est sec. Il est important d’appliquer une crème hydratante sur la peau après chaque utilisation, car le vêtement peut assécher la peau. Appliquer la crème à la fin de la journée, lorsque le vêtement est retiré, assure que la crème hydratante sera complètement absorbée avant d’enfiler le vêtement la journée suivante. Ceci prolongera la durée de vie du vêtement;</li><li>ne tirez pas le bas par le haut (comme vous le feriez pour un bas normal), car le bas sera plus difficile à enfiler et cela prendra plus de temps. Plutôt, mettez le bas l’envers (l’intérieur à l’extérieur) sur la moitié de sa longueur puis insérez le pied jusqu’à ce que le bas dépasse le talon. Par la suite, en utilisant la paume de votre main plutôt que vos doigts, dépliez le bas graduellement en remontant le long de la jambe;</li><li>pour les manches : mettez la manche à l’envers sur la moitié de sa longueur et passez votre main à l’intérieur jusqu’à ce que le bas de la manche soit au niveau du poignet. Ensuite, utilisez la paume de votre main afin de glisser la manche vers le haut vers l’aisselle;</li><li>technique pour enlever le vêtement : en prenant le haut du vêtement, tirez la manche ou le bas le long du membre comme si vous l’épluchiez. Le vêtement devrait être retourné à l’envers une fois enlevé;</li><li>une fois que le bas au genou ou la manche est enfilé de manière adéquate, le haut du vêtement devrait reposer environ un pouce (2,5 cm) sous le pli du genou ou de l’aisselle.</li></ul><p>Un préposé à l’essayage peut vous montrer certains trucs et dispositifs qui vous aidereront à enfiler le bas ou la manche, comme utiliser un gant à enfiler (ou un gant de nettoyage en caoutchouc) afin d’enfiler le vêtement plus facilement.</p><p>La longueur et la taille du vêtement peuvent ne pas être adaptées à votre enfant si :</p><ul><li>il cherche à plier ou à rouler le vêtement vers le bas, afin de l’éloigner du pli du genou ou de l’aisselle;</li><li>le bas a tendance à toujours glisser ou rouler vers le bas.</li></ul><h2>À l’hôpital SickKids</h2><p>L’équipe de thrombose de l’hôpital SickKids comprend un infirmier praticien, des médecins traitants, des étudiants se spécialisant en thrombose et du personnel de recherche. Si vous êtes un patient à SickKids, vous assisterez à des rendez-vous de suivi à notre clinique externe de thrombose, ouverte les lundis, mercredis et vendredis.<br></p><p>Pour les patients de SickKids, veuillez consulter les renseignements suivants dans les situations non urgentes et urgentes :</p><ul><li>pour les questions cliniques non urgentes, communiquez avec l’infirmier praticien au : 416 813-8514</li><li>pour des renseignements sur votre rendez-vous ou pour le modifier, veuillez communiquer avec le coordonnateur de la clinique de thrombose au : 416 813-5453, poste 2</li><li>pour les urgences cliniques survenant en dehors des heures d’ouverture, communiquez avec le resident en médecine de garde au : 416-813-7500</li></ul>

 

 

Elastic compression garments2883.00000000000Elastic compression garmentsElastic compression garmentsEEnglishHaematologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Arm;LegsCardiovascular systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2017-09-25T04:00:00ZLeonardo Brandao, MD, MSc.;Jennifer Vincelli, RN (EC), BScN, MN;Maria Laura Avila, MD, PhD;Celeste Lumia, BKin;Madeline Montoya, BA;Talia RahifHealth (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Elastic compression garments improve symptoms of deep vein thrombosis and post-thrombotic syndrome. Find out what they are and how to properly use them.</p><p>​​Elastic compression garments are used to improve symptoms of <a href="/article?contentid=2534&language=English">deep vein thrombosis (DVT)</a> and <a href="/article?contentid=2884&language=English">post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS)​</a> by helping to transport blood back to the heart. They prevent fluid from pooling in the affected limb, as well as reduce swelling, pain and other symptoms.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Elastic compression garments are used to improve symptoms of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) by helping to transport blood back to the heart.</li><li>Compression garments are available in different degrees of pressure, depending on your child’s needs.</li><li>Wearing the compression garment is especially important when participating in physical activity, while travelling, or when your child’s symptoms of PTS worsen. </li><li>Compression garments should be worn daily for however long they continue to ease and improve symptoms of DVT and PTS, which can vary by weeks, months or years.</li><li>Compression garments should be replaced every six months, if worn daily.</li></ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><p>Stop using the compression garments and contact the thrombosis clinic or the thrombosis doctor in case of:</p> <ul><li>increase in pain with the use of compression garments</li><li>change in the color and temperature of the skin with the use of compression garments: toes turn pale and cold or purple.<br></li></ul><h2>Washing instructions</h2><p>Follow the washing instructions on the label of the garments. Wash the garments after each use, if possible. This preserves the fabrics elasticity, and removes oils and dirt.</p><p>Do not use detergent! Wash only with mild soap.</p><h3>Tips for machine-washing</h3><p>The label of the garment will tell you whether machine washing and drying are permitted. Wash and dry according to the manufacturer’s instructions. </p><ul><li>It is best to use a mesh laundry bag for protection.</li><li>When setting the dryer settings, ensure you’ve chosen the delicate cycle.</li></ul><h3>Tips for hand washing</h3><ul><li>Wet the garment and apply soap.</li><li>Gently rub the fabric together. Try your best not to stretch it.</li><li>Rinse and repeat, if needed.</li><li>Pat the garment dry with a towel. Do not wring and twist it.</li><li>Let it air-dry.</li></ul><h2>When to replace elastic compression garments</h2><p>After each use, the fabric of the garment will lose some of its elasticity. Garments generally last about six months. You should contact the thrombosis clinic to get a new prescription before six months have passed, as it may take two to three weeks for the new garment to arrive after ordering. </p><h2>Where to purchase elastic compression garments</h2><p>Many medical supply companies and pharmacies sell elastic compression garments. Ask your health-care provider which company they recommend. It is best to talk to an expert garment fitter to check options and learn how to properly apply and remove the garments.</p><p>The garment fitter will take your child’s arm or leg measurements, to make sure they get a sock or sleeve that fits properly. Every brand uses different methods of measurement, the most common being measuring the diameter along the patient’s leg or arm at various locations.</p><p>There are many ready-made socks or sleeves you can buy, which come in various sizes. Garments can also be custom made for your child. For small children, a custom sleeve or sock is usually necessary.</p><p>Socks are usually sold in pairs, but it is only necessary to wear the garment on the affected limb.</p><h3>Insurance coverage</h3><p>The cost of elastic compression garments depends on the compression level, brand, style and place of purchase. Customized fittings tend to be more expensive.</p><p>Some insurance companies do cover compression garments. It is best to consult your insurance benefits. Some companies require a letter from the doctor mentioning they prescribed the garment. Ask the thrombosis doctor who prescribed your child’s garment to provide you with a letter.</p><h2>What are elastic compression garments?</h2><p>Elastic compression garments are made of breathable elastic fabrics such as nylon, cotton, spandex or natural rubber. They are occasionally referred to as “graduated compression garments”. The stockings are tightest at the ankle (where the most pressure is put by the body) and become less tight as the garment moves up the leg. A compression sleeve is tightest at the wrist and becomes less tight as it moves up the arm.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Effect of elastic compression garments on damaged veins</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/compression_garments_damaged_veins_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can damage a vein. As a result, the vein wall does not function properly and the vein valves open wider than usual. This results in backward blood flow, away from the heart. Compression garments gently compress the muscle and expanded vein wall, allowing the valves to close once again, resulting in healthier blood flow towards the heart.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Compression garments are typically available in several different lengths and sizes. Stockings can come up to the knee, thigh, or waist, with an option of open or closed toe. Your doctor will prescribe the appropriate garment length, but knee-high stockings are the most commonly prescribed in children with PTS in the legs.</p><p>For the arms, sleeves are only made in a full-length style. The sleeve ends about two fingers below the underarm and begins either at the wrist (sleeve-style), the thumb (gauntlet-style) or midway through the fingers (glove-style).</p><p>Elastic compression garments gently compress the muscles in the affected limb as well as the expanded vein walls. With the vein walls being less stretched, the vein valves are able to close once again, resulting in healthier overall circulation.</p><h3>Class of compression</h3><p>Compression garments are available in various degrees of pressure, or classes of compression. Compression is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg), with the highest compression at the ankle or wrist joints. The higher the pressure is, the tighter the garment will fit. There are different compression levels (15-20 mmHg, 20-30 mmHg, 30-40 mmHg and +40 mmHg) depending on what your child needs. </p><h2>How to wear elastic compression garments</h2><p>Elastic compression garments are intended to be tight. This can make putting them on difficult, especially when putting them on your child. The following tips will make it easier to put on the garments:</p><ul><li>Wash the garment before the first use, to decrease its stiffness. </li><li>Ensure the limb is dry. It is important to apply moisturizing cream to the skin after each use because garments can cause dry skin. Applying creams at the end of the day, when the garment is removed, ensures that moisturizers are completely absorbed before putting on the garment the following day. This will increase the lifespan of the garment. </li><li>Do not pull the stocking by the top (as with a normal sock), since that will make application more difficult and will take more time. Instead, invert (turn inside out) the stocking halfway and insert the foot until the stocking is over the heel. Next, using your palm rather than fingers, gradually unfold the stocking moving up the leg. </li><li>For sleeves: Invert the sleeve halfway and put the hand through it until the bottom part of the sleeve is at the level of the wrist. Then, use the palm of your hand to glide the sleeve up toward the underarm.</li><li>Technique to remove garments: Holding the top of the garment, peel the sleeve or stocking down the limb. The garment should be inside out once removed.</li><li>After properly applying the knee-high stockings or sleeve, the top of the garment should be approximately one-inch below the bend of the knee or underarm.</li></ul><p>An expert garment fitter can show you some tricks and devices to help apply the stocking or sleeve, such as using a donning glove (or a rubber cleaning glove) to make putting on the garment easier.</p><p>The length or size of the garment may be wrong for your child if:</p><ul><li>They want to fold or roll the top of the garment down, away from the bend in the knee or underarm.</li><li>The stocking continuously slides or rolls down on its own.</li></ul><h2>How long to wear compression garments</h2><p>Although the standard recommendation is to wear the garment from the time your child wakes up, until just before they go to sleep, wearing the garment is especially important when participating in physical activity, travelling, or when your child’s symptoms of PTS worsen. </p><p>If swelling is a major concern, it might be best to put the compression garment on when your child wakes up, because the limb will be less swollen then.</p><p>Your child does not need to wear their garment at night. Remember that the pressure in the garment, particularly the socks, has been designed for someone that is walking. </p><p>Generally, the compression garments are to be worn every day for however long they ease and improve symptoms, which can vary by weeks, months or years. </p><p>Expect to return to the thrombosis clinic every year, to check the duration of the treatment.</p>Elastic compression garmentsFalse

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