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MenstruationMMenstruationMenstruationEnglishGenital and reproductivePre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Uterus;Fallopian tubes;OvariesVagina;Uterus;Fallopian tube;OvaryConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZSheila Jacobson, MBBCh, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>An easy-to-understand overview of this important stage in a young girl's development.<br></p><h2>What is menstruation?</h2> <p>When girls reach a certain age, they start to release blood from their vagina each month. This is called menstruation or "period". When a girl starts to menstruate, she is able to get pregnant.</p> <p>Most girls get their period about two years after the breasts start to form. This is usually when they are about 12 or 13 years old. Some girls get the first period as early as nine years old, while others may not get it until they are in their mid teens. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>When girls start to menstruate, they become physically capable of getting pregnant.</li> <li>Most girls get their first menstrual period when they are about 12 or 13 years old.</li> <li>Initiate the conversation if your child has not brought up the topic as she approaches the preteen years.</li> <li>Do not interrupt day-to-day activities.</li> <li>If over-the-counter medicines do not relieve pain, talk to your child's doctor.</li> </ul><h2>When to seek medical help</h2> <p>Make an appointment with your daughter's doctor if:</p> <ul> <li>her periods last more than seven days</li> <li>over-the-counter medicines do not relieve her menstrual cramps</li> <li>she's soaking more pads or tampons than usual</li> <li>she's missing school or other activities because of painful or heavy periods</li> <li>she goes three months without a period</li> <li>she may be pregnant</li> <li>she hasn't started menstruating by age 15</li> </ul>
الحيضاالحيضMenstruationArabicGenital and reproductivePre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Uterus;Fallopian tubes;OvariesVagina;Uterus;Fallopian tube;OvaryConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZSheila Jacobson, MBBCh, FRCPC7.0000000000000065.0000000000000825.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>نظرة عامة سهلة الفهم عن هذه المرحلة الهامة في نمو ابنتك.</p>
月經月經MenstruationChineseSimplifiedGenital and reproductivePre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Uterus;Fallopian tubes;OvariesVagina;Uterus;Fallopian tube;OvaryConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZSheila Jacobson, MBBCh, FRCPC65.00000000000007.00000000000000825.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z简要概述了年轻女孩的这一重要发育阶段。<br>
MenstruationsMMenstruationsMenstruationFrenchGenital and reproductivePre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Uterus;Fallopian tubes;OvariesVagina;Uterus;Fallopian tube;OvaryConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZSheila Jacobson, MBBCh, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Un survol facile à comprendre de cette importante étape dans le développement d’une jeune fille.</p><h2>Que sont les menstruations?</h2> <p>Quand les filles atteignent un certain âge, du sang commence à s’écouler du vagin chaque mois. C’est ce que l’on appelle les menstruations ou les « règles ». Quand une fille commence à avoir ses règles, elle peut tomber enceinte.</p> <p>La plupart des filles ont leurs menstruations environ 2 ans après la formation des seins. C’est habituellement à l’âge de 12 ou 13 ans. Certaines filles ont leurs règles dès l'âge de 9 ans, tandis que pour d’autres, elles arrivent au milieu de l’adolescence. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Quand les filles commencent à être menstruées, elles ont la capacité physique de tomber enceintes.</li> <li>La plupart des filles ont leurs premières règles quand elles ont environ 12 ou 13 ans.</li> <li>Entamez la conversation si votre pré-adolescente n’a pas abordé le sujet.</li> <li>Poursuivre les activités quotidiennes.</li> <li>Si les médicaments en vente libre ne soulagent pas la douleur, consultez un médecin.</li> </ul><h2>Quand consulter un médecin</h2> <p>Prenez rendez-vous avec le médecin de votre fille si : </p> <ul> <li>Ses règles durent plus de 7 jours</li> <li>Les médicaments en vente libre ne soulagent pas la douleur</li> <li>Elle utilise plus de tampons ou de serviettes qu’à l’habitude</li> <li>Elle manque l’école ou évite d’autres activités parce que ses règles sont douloureuses ou abondantes</li> <li>Elle n’a pas de règles pendant trois mois ou plus</li> <li>Il se peut qu’elle soit enceinte</li> <li>Elle a atteint l’âge de 15 ans et n’a pas de menstruations</li> </ul>
ماھواریمماھواریMenstruationUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZSheila Jacobson, MBBCh, FRCPC65.00000000000007.00000000000000825.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>نوجوان لڑکی کی نشونما کی ایک اھم منزل کے بارے میں آسانی سے سمجھ آنے والا جائزہ۔<br></p>

 

 

Menstruation299.000000000000MenstruationMenstruationMEnglishGenital and reproductivePre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Uterus;Fallopian tubes;OvariesVagina;Uterus;Fallopian tube;OvaryConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZSheila Jacobson, MBBCh, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>An easy-to-understand overview of this important stage in a young girl's development.<br></p><h2>What is menstruation?</h2> <p>When girls reach a certain age, they start to release blood from their vagina each month. This is called menstruation or "period". When a girl starts to menstruate, she is able to get pregnant.</p> <p>Most girls get their period about two years after the breasts start to form. This is usually when they are about 12 or 13 years old. Some girls get the first period as early as nine years old, while others may not get it until they are in their mid teens. </p><h2>The menstrual cycle</h2><p>A cycle is the amount of time between a girl's periods. Most women's cycles last between 21 to 35 days. The period itself can last anywhere from two to eight days. Periods and cycles are not regular when they first start. It can take more than two years for the cycle to regulate.</p><h3>The menstrual cycle pattern</h3><ul><li>Girls are born with all their eggs, which are stored in the ovaries. When a girl reaches puberty, an egg ripens once a month. The egg then leaves one of the two ovaries (ovulation).</li><li>The ovaries release hormones. This creates a thick and cushioned uterus lining (endometrium).</li><li>Around the time of ovulation, the uterus is ready for a possible pregnancy. If your daughter has unprotected sex around this time and a sperm may fertilizes an egg. The egg travels to the uterus and attaches to the cushiony wall. Then it slowly develops into a baby.</li><li>An unfertilized egg does not attach to the wall of the uterus. The uterus flushes away the extra tissue lining. The menstrual flow or period includes the unfertilized egg, unused blood and tissue. It leaves the uterus, flows through the vagina and out of the body.</li></ul> <figure> <p class="asset-image-title">Female Reproductive System</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Female_reproductive_teen_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of the vagina, uterus, uterine lining, ovary, and fallopian tubes" /> </figure> <h3>Adjusting to change</h3><p>Menstruation is a normal, healthy part of being a woman. Girls can still enjoy swimming, running and all of their normal activities. When the period arrives, mark the time on a calendar. Remember that the period can take several years to become regular. Make sure your daughter has pads readily available and knows how to use them. Most girls do not use tampons for their first period but will learn how to use them with time. Cramps and discomfort are common.</p><h3>Managing the pain</h3><p>Over-the-counter medicines, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English"> ibuprofen </a> can relieve painful cramps. If these medicines do not help, talk to a doctor. Stronger medicine requires a prescription. Birth control pills can also help decrease painful periods. Exercise and other physical activity can help relieve the pain.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>When girls start to menstruate, they become physically capable of getting pregnant.</li> <li>Most girls get their first menstrual period when they are about 12 or 13 years old.</li> <li>Initiate the conversation if your child has not brought up the topic as she approaches the preteen years.</li> <li>Do not interrupt day-to-day activities.</li> <li>If over-the-counter medicines do not relieve pain, talk to your child's doctor.</li> </ul><h2>What you can do to help your daughter</h2> <h3>Talk openly</h3> <p>Encourage your daughter to ask questions without fear or judgment. If your daughter's friends and the Internet are her only sources of education, she may receive some poor advice. You can start the conversation by asking her what she knows about puberty. Offer as much information as you think she needs to know. If your child has not brought up the topic as she nears her preteen years, it is up to you to initiate the conversation. You may want to discuss basic hygiene, sexual maturity and teenage pregnancy. If single fathers do not feel comfortable bringing up the topic, ask a female friend or relative to speak with your daughter.</p><h2>When to seek medical help</h2> <p>Make an appointment with your daughter's doctor if:</p> <ul> <li>her periods last more than seven days</li> <li>over-the-counter medicines do not relieve her menstrual cramps</li> <li>she's soaking more pads or tampons than usual</li> <li>she's missing school or other activities because of painful or heavy periods</li> <li>she goes three months without a period</li> <li>she may be pregnant</li> <li>she hasn't started menstruating by age 15</li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Female_reproductive_teen_MED_ILL_EN.jpgMenstruationFalse

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